Is It Better to Floss Before Or After Brushing One's Teeth?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2015 4:25 AM GMT
    NYT: it turns out flossing is not a proven way to prevent cavities, even though some dentists and hygienists suggest it is.

    Rather, flossing’s main benefit is stanching bloody gums and reducing the gum inflammation known as gingivitis.

    “Gingivitis is the first step in losing your teeth.”

    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/05/29/ask-well-floss-or-brush-first/?ref=health
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 02, 2015 12:18 AM GMT
    indeed. flossing is for cleaning plaque build-up below the gum line.

    for this reason, i think its better to floss before brushing. it gets the gunk out of those small places. following up with brushing takes it away with everything else.
  • Breeman

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    Jun 02, 2015 3:31 PM GMT
    As my dentist tells me, it's all about disrupting the bacteria.
  • jaxsurfer

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    Jun 03, 2015 10:26 PM GMT
    Always floss before brushing. This coming from my dad who was a dental professor at Ohio State for many years.
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    Jun 04, 2015 12:45 AM GMT
    Floss before brushing is the right thing to do.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 04, 2015 12:51 AM GMT
    I can't stand when people floss after brushing, you can smell it on their breath and it's nasty.

    Always floss before brushing!
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    Jun 04, 2015 1:17 AM GMT
    jaxsurfer saidAlways floss before brushing. This coming from my dad who was a dental professor at Ohio State for many years.

    Agreed. You want to brush and rinse away the material that flossing removes.
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    Jun 04, 2015 3:00 AM GMT
    I would think it more beneficial to floss before brushing.

    If some thing is stuck on/in between your teeth, then the fluoride is not going saturate all the areas of your teeth. It would be like spray painting a poster on the floor with a penny on it. Everything would appear to be the color you painted it until you removed the penny. Then there would be that one spot that is untouched.
  • FRE0

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    Jun 04, 2015 10:43 PM GMT
    Awesomepossum saidI would think it more beneficial to floss before brushing.

    If some thing is stuck on/in between your teeth, then the fluoride is not going saturate all the areas of your teeth. It would be like spray painting a poster on the floor with a penny on it. Everything would appear to be the color you painted it until you removed the penny. Then there would be that one spot that is untouched.


    But if one applies a fluoride gel as the final step, then flossing after brushing would not reduce the effectiveness of the fluoride.
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    Jun 06, 2015 2:34 PM GMT
    First of all, flossing is an effective way to reduce one's risk of developing caries. It's all about disrupting the palque accumulation on the proximal surfaces of teeth.

    Second, as a pediatric dentist, I advocate brushing first & then immediately flossing (w/o rinsing off the toothpaste) in order to push some the residual toothpaste in b/w the teeth.
  • mindblank

    Posts: 275

    Jun 07, 2015 2:32 PM GMT
    icon_idea.gif Floss one tooth after brushing

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AdKUJxjn-R8
  • FRE0

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    Jun 10, 2015 9:28 PM GMT
    sweetyork saidFirst of all, flossing is an effective way to reduce one's risk of developing caries. It's all about disrupting the palque accumulation on the proximal surfaces of teeth.

    Second, as a pediatric dentist, I advocate brushing first & then immediately flossing (w/o rinsing off the toothpaste) in order to push some the residual toothpaste in b/w the teeth.


    I rinse thoroughly after brushing, flossing, and using the gum poker. Then I follow up by applying a fluoride gel and, after waiting for a minute or two, expectorating without doing any more rinsing.

    I cannot imagine brushing then not rinsing. Brushing dislodges food particles in the mouth where many stay unless rinsed away.