Does Your Mouth Water for Soft-Shell Crab?

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    Jun 03, 2015 2:08 AM GMT
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    NYT: An Alaskan King crab is enormous, with incredibly long legs. By comparison, the hefty, meaty West Coast Dungeness crab seems small.

    But the Eastern blue crab is smaller still, and it has a marvelous, distinctive feature. Some East Coast fisherman’s clever ancestor discovered this: During warm weather, the blue crab miraculously sheds its hard outer shell and grows a new one. That moment must be seized.

    Fans look forward to the season — late spring and early summer (actually, all summer long) — with feverish anticipation. Eating a soft-shell crab is a crab experience like no other.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/03/dining/soft-shell-crab-recipe.html?
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    Jun 03, 2015 2:51 AM GMT
    The bible says you should be put to death if you eat shellfish.
  • bobbobbob

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    Jun 03, 2015 2:59 AM GMT
    Heck yes!

    My grandson works weekends at a seafood store so he snatches them when we're ready for some. I have two big skillets, one will fit in the other so I can press them while I'm frying them, flatten them out. Then we put them on toasted hoagie rolls with my version of tartar sauce and fried onion rings, lettuce, etc.

    They ought to be about ready to do it now down here.

    I just made a note about them. Thanks for reminding me.
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    Jun 04, 2015 12:51 AM GMT
    I've lived on the Chesapeake Bay and have hand caught and/or eaten thousands of blue claws but I have never developed a taste for soft shells or the "crab fat" in the points of the hard shell.
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    Jun 04, 2015 1:12 AM GMT
    My favorite crab is Dungeness. Named after a bay on the northern end of the Puget Sound near Seattle. My husband, who is forever mispronouncing everything, calls them "Dungeon" crabs, evoking both disturbing and comical images.

    I used to legally catch Dungeness crab, when I'd camp in that area. Its range is actually along much of the Pacific Northwest coast. Its shell is very thin & brittle, you can often crack much of it with your bare fingers. But it's a large, full-size crab, and the meat very sweet. Sometimes shipped to other parts of the US (though frozen) I recommend you try them if you have the opportunity.