Attended a 90th Birthday Party Today

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    Jun 07, 2015 8:21 PM GMT
    For a nice lady who's our neighbor. And as I was sitting there, I said to my husband:

    "My God, everyone here is ancient! Is this the club I've now joined?" (One of the other guests was 92)

    I guess so. Well, at least I made it this far, and got to join it at all, for which I suppose I should be grateful. But still, a bit jarring to see all these old people, and realize these are my contemporaries.

    We all go through different stages in our lives. When we enter our teens, when we leave our teens, when we advance through each decade of age.

    I already knew how old I am, but to be sitting there surrounded by a crowd fit for a nursing home was a new shock to me.

    The birthday lady herself was a delight, and an inspiration. We should all hope to reach 90. That is becoming increasingly common today, once a great rarity when I was a kid. Hell, few people even made their 80s back then. Now it's a routine occurrence.
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    Jun 07, 2015 9:02 PM GMT
    Was it yours?
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    Jun 07, 2015 10:03 PM GMT
    jmusmc85 saidWas it yours?

    No, a neighbor's as I stated in the first sentence. Have trouble with reading comprehension much? I'm 66.
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    Jun 08, 2015 12:58 AM GMT
    What a coincidence. 66? My grandmother was supposed to die of cancer at 66 but she beat it and on our shared birthday this year she turns 102. She always looked younger than her age without work (sound familiar?) and is, according to the intel I received yesterday from a visiting cousin, the "Queen Bee" and "Mean Girl" at her assisted living facility. An example: she wouldn't let a lady sit at her lunch table (SO high school) and when the lady complained to management they made HER apologize to my grandmother, who said "I DON'T accept your apology." I was told "They love her because she's such a bitch." I guess us gays aren't the only ones who love our bitches (though the sexuality of the ALF's management wasn't broached).

    We can all take lessons from my grandmother.
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    Jun 08, 2015 1:04 AM GMT
    Art, I think there's a big difference between 66 and 92.
    Maybe not in years, but in decay. Not so sure I'd call her your contemporary. Neighbor perhaps. I'm sure if you were in a room of 58-68 yr olds it would have felt a bit closer to home.
    Something about a body when it goes from 80- 90 anything, starts to become more frail.
    Pretty sure you still have plenty of tread on your tires.
  • venue35

    Posts: 4644

    Jun 08, 2015 1:11 AM GMT
    Wow 90 years that's a long time for anyone to be on this planet
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    Jun 08, 2015 1:14 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidFor a nice lady who's our neighbor. And as I was sitting there, I said to my husband:

    "My God, everyone here is ancient! Is this the club I've now joined?" (One of the other guests was 92)

    I guess so. Well, at least I made it this far, and got to join it at all, for which I suppose I should be grateful. But still, a bit jarring to see all these old people, and realize these are my contemporaries.

    We all go through different stages in our lives. When we enter our teens, when we leave our teens, when we advance through each decade of age.

    I already knew how old I am, but to be sitting there surrounded by a crowd fit for a nursing home was a new shock to me.

    The birthday lady herself was a delight, and an inspiration. We should all hope to reach 90. That is becoming increasingly common today, once a great rarity when I was a kid. Hell, few people even made their 80s back then. Now it's a routine occurrence.



    Interesting, My husband I and are are now in our 50s and we are laughing as we are now those guys who are older.

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    Jun 08, 2015 1:22 AM GMT
    TheGuyNextDoor said
    I'm sure if you were in a room of 58-68 yr olds it would have felt a bit closer to home.
    Something about a body when it goes from 80- 90 anything, starts to become more frail.
    Pretty sure you still have plenty of tread on your tires.

    I may have been the youngest one there. I knew at least 5 who were in their 80s.

    As far as having tread on my own tires, I see an orthopedic surgeon this Tuesday. I may have fractured my shoulder. Has hurt like Hell for 2 weeks.

    I had a seizure at this keyboard while chatting with you guys and keeled over onto a ceramic tile floor. Oddly, I never have a seizure while driving or riding a motorcycle. I'm guessing it has something to do with brain wiring, but I dunno.

    I woke up on the floor, but my husband couldn't hear me calling. I was able to reach my cell phone in my pocket, and called him in the room right next to this office! He was able to get me back onto my feet.

    I didn't feel any shoulder pain until late the next day. Whether there is a relationship I don't know. Hopefully the doctor visit on Tuesday will tell me. I take a rather laissez faire attitude to my injuries, which goes back to my Army days.

    When it was shouted at us: "You're not authorized to be sick!" And so I try to be sick as little as possible, and complain even less.
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    Jun 08, 2015 1:48 AM GMT
    Man, I just realized that in cleaning up Mom's house, I haven't come across the VHS tape of my Great-Gramma's 100th birthday. It starts out deliciously, with a couple of the 70-something siblings bending over the camera sniping at each other ("Is this thing on?" "You're doing it wrong, as usual!") Gramma was kind of out of it by then. Still very self-aware, but physically fragile at 90 though.
  • bobbobbob

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    Jun 08, 2015 2:27 AM GMT


    I empathize AD.

    I had an aunt who used to have those types of seizures and fall in the floor.

    I hope you didn't spill your drink like she always used to do.
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    Jun 08, 2015 3:41 AM GMT
    bobbobbob said

    I empathize AD.

    I had an aunt who used to have those types of seizures and fall in the floor.

    I hope you didn't spill your drink like she always used to do.

    I didn't have a drink. In fact, I rarely have any liquid thing near this keyboard. Apple keyboards are very sensitive to having anything spilled on them, I've had to replace several.

    I have benign essential tremor in my hands. RJ guys who have met me will notice that I take my drinks with both hands. On bad days I can't write, nor sign my name.

    All a legacy of my military head traumas, according to the VA neurologists. But that's OK, I compensate in other ways. icon_biggrin.gif
  • bobbobbob

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    Jun 08, 2015 4:12 AM GMT

    Yeah. I understand. My aunt used to spill her drinks on her baby grand keyboard and blame it on her apple juice.

    She used to have to pick up her drinks with both hands too. Back then it was called DTs.. Delirium tremens but it got better as soon as she guzzled a few gin and tonics. When she was really bad her hands would shake so bad she couldn't write either. One time she wrote me a letter that was in an envelope that was was so illegible that it went to a tablecloth factory is Sudan. It was a good thing they recognized her handwriting. There was a $12.00 check in the letter to help pay for my quintuple bypass surgery and penile enhancement and a trip to Chattanooga to go to Lookout Mountain and run through Fat Man's Squeeze without getting rock burns while wearing a kilt.

    As a USAF brat I probably knew 500 senior officers without head trauma... and none with it. I never heard of any officer other than combat pilots ending up with head trauma. I'm trying to figure out how you could have gotten "a legacy of military head traumas." As an officer you either had to be a desk pilot or a pilot. If you had head trauma as a pilot you'd be wearing your eyeballs next to your testes. I'm betting the entire audience would love to hear how you ended up with head trauma...if they can stay awake.



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    Jun 08, 2015 6:27 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    bobbobbob saidI empathize AD.
    I had an aunt who used to have those types of seizures and fall in the floor.
    I hope you didn't spill your drink like she always used to do.
    I didn't have a drink. In fact, I rarely have any liquid thing near this keyboard. Apple keyboards are very sensitive to having anything spilled on them, I've had to replace several.
    I have benign essential tremor in my hands. RJ guys who have met me will notice that I take my drinks with both hands. On bad days I can't write, nor sign my name.
    All a legacy of my military head traumas, according to the VA neurologists. But that's OK, I compensate in other ways. icon_biggrin.gif

    I was guessing that you'd had head some head trauma, either during or after the Army.
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    Jun 08, 2015 9:09 AM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    I was guessing that you'd had head some head trauma, either during or after the Army.

    It's the most likely candidate for my epilepsy. The source of epilepsy is always problematic, There can be many causes. But my documented history of head trauma injuries during my military service makes them the leading culprit.
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    Jun 08, 2015 9:43 AM GMT
    bobbobbob said
    As an officer you either had to be a desk pilot or a pilot. If you had head trauma as a pilot you'd be wearing your eyeballs next to your testes. I'm betting the entire audience would love to hear how you ended up with head trauma...if they can stay awake.

    I was in the US Army, Military Police Corps, not the Air Force. One time I'd been on shift for nearly 24 hours, and due to exhaustion fell down a flight of stairs at the Provost Marshall's office after making a report. I was in the hospital for a week. There's a funny story associated with it, but I don't want to put anyone to sleep. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Another time I was run over in the field by a jeep, slamming my head into the ground. It resulted in another hospital stay. I was also near a lighting strike on another occasion, but not struck directly according to observers.

    I was in an open field that was partially flooded when the bolt came down nearby. The electricity apparently spread out through the water and jolted me, causing me to involuntarily leap and land several feet away. The medics found bruises on my head from where I hit the ground, wearing my steel "pot" helmet. Those things were good protection against shrapnel & debris, but not impact injuries.

    There were numerous other klonks on my noggin, but well enough documented that my epilepsy is judged to be service connected. Any other questions, draft dodger?
  • TheBaise

    Posts: 362

    Jun 08, 2015 2:12 PM GMT
    stock-footage-woman-awakens-drunk-man.jp

    Yeah, I'm a two fisted drinker. I'm also an impotent military man. I've seen combat. You better heave ho there, civilian! I've also got a wife and kids somewhere. They can't find me down here in Florida with my husband. Well, he isn't really my husband, I made that up. We ain't legal. I only became gay later in life. After my fabulous military career. I tell people I was a Colonel. I wasn't really. But what the hell, it's the internet, ya know?
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    Jun 08, 2015 2:24 PM GMT
    be the best gay you can be; ignore it.
    love you more.
  • bobbobbob

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    Jun 08, 2015 4:10 PM GMT

    LOL. me? A draft dodger? They wouldn't take me even though I passed the physical. They discriminated against me for being born with one foot.

    Did you get medals for falling on your head?
  • metta

    Posts: 39091

    Jun 08, 2015 4:22 PM GMT
    I have been to a birthday party for a friend that turned a 100. She past away when she turned 101 though. Her body deteriorated so much....to the point that her organs were slowly failing, she went blind, and she was bed ridden. I just would not want to live like that. She used to tell me that she prayed every day to ask God to take her. She lived longer than all of her family, including her children.
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    Jun 08, 2015 8:26 PM GMT
    <a href=photo smallMel_zpswo9aofmb.jpg">
    My boss turned 91 in April. He get around unassisted, drives, and still has spunk. I did a drawing from his Navy days as a BD present.
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    Jun 08, 2015 8:51 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Lumpyoatmeal said
    I was guessing that you'd had head some head trauma, either during or after the Army.

    It's the most likely candidate for my epilepsy. The source of epilepsy is always problematic, There can be many causes. But my documented history of head trauma injuries during my military service makes them the leading culprit.

    Sounds reasonable.
  • metta

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    Jun 08, 2015 8:58 PM GMT
    timmm55 said<a href=photo smallMel_zpswo9aofmb.jpg">
    My boss turned 91 in April. He get around unassisted, drives, and still has spunk. I did a drawing from his Navy days as a BD present.


    And he is still working....good for him....there is something to be said for never retiring.
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    Jun 08, 2015 11:09 PM GMT
    bobbobbob said
    LOL. me? A draft dodger? They wouldn't take me even though I passed the physical. They discriminated against me for being born with one foot.

    Did you get medals for falling on your head?

    How could you "pass the physical" if you only have one foot?

    My Father didn't had fingers on his left hand, due to a childhood accident. He was "4F" disqualified, but filled an appeal. He was granted an exception to policy, and served in the US Army throughout WWII. When he could have remained a safe civilian.

    My Mother's brother also volunteered, and fought in North Africa, and was part of the Normandy invasion. Where he died a few weeks later during the "breakout". I am named after him.

    In fact, every single generation of my family has worn a military uniform in this country since the mid-1600s. Sometimes in the colonial militia, later in the service of the United States, from the Revolutionary War through the Civil War and since.

    Only briefly they served, in times of need. I'm the first who actually made a career of it. I don't know if my oldest son will make a career of it, too. But he's the 13th unbroken generation (I'm not sure of the number) in this country to have worn a military uniform. I must assume it's in the genes.

    And yeah, Mr. Coward, I do have some medals. A whole chest full, and not for "falling on my head".

    When you insult my military service you insult every guy here who served in uniform. In the United States, as well as the military services around the world.
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    Jun 08, 2015 11:25 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    Art_Deco said
    When you insult my military service you insult every guy here who served in uniform. In the United States, as well as the military services around the world.

    I know of several on here who are NOT insulted. Just sayin...

    And your own military service is what?
  • LJay

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    Jun 09, 2015 12:59 AM GMT
    Art, passing out from a seizure means a trip to the doctor ASAP, not "on Tuesday."

    After I had an MRI for an unrelated issue, I found out that I had had several mini strokes. Now I go to the doctor when stuff happens. Even my overworked (and excellent!) doctors tell me this is what I should do.