Why are some poor at sports?

  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Jun 13, 2015 12:30 PM GMT
    Therefore some avoid sports altogether while others opt for individual sports like swimming, etc. This article explains about developmental coordination disorder

    http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Developmental_coordination_disorder
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    Jun 13, 2015 7:14 PM GMT
    Sounds like that report is spot on...especially with the causes.

    This cause caught my attention: Overly protective parents – some parents may discourage their children from playing sports for fear of injury.

    That's precisely the reason I never got into any extreme sport till I was in my 30's...always afraid of getting hurt.
  • ZakSayWhat

    Posts: 573

    Jun 13, 2015 9:05 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidSounds like that report is spot on...especially with the causes.

    This cause caught my attention: Overly protective parents – some parents may discourage their children from playing sports for fear of injury.

    That's precisely the reason I never got into any extreme sport till I was in my 30's...always afraid of getting hurt.


    my mum hated the idea of me getting hurt.
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    Jun 14, 2015 12:40 PM GMT
    I have very bad eyesight so my eye had coordination sucked; therefore, I sucked at every sport. Attempting to play any sport was humiliating. I rejected sports early on. I also don't understand people who like to watch sports for hours on end so I don't even watch it.
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    Jun 14, 2015 5:03 PM GMT
    Sounds a bit over-diagnosing to categorize the not enjoying of or excelling at sports as some disorder. What's this, macho-medicine?

    I always felt more natural moving in water than on land even as a little kid. And I'm a strong swimmer. Never liked running, always loved swimming. Running felt awkward and then I wound up with Osgood-Schlatter's so maybe my body knew it wasn't designed for it. While even my brother has spontaneously commented on the grace of my stroke while he never otherwise compliments me on anything.

    True that I'm not good to catch or throw in a game of sports, but piss me off and from distance I'll beam you between the eyes with whatever's at hand, whether that's a throw or target practice. My pool game can get quite good as well.

    Some of us think a healthy bod is important but simply aren't into sports. There's nothing disordered about that.

    This sounds like the racism v preference nonsense.

    White guys can't jump; black guys can't swim. Must be a disorder.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-11172054
    Why don't black Americans swim?
    ...Just under 70% of African-American children surveyed said they had no or low ability to swim. Low ability merely meant they were able to splash around in the shallow end...

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    Jun 14, 2015 6:51 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidI have very bad eyesight so my eye had coordination sucked; therefore, I sucked at every sport. Attempting to play any sport was humiliating. I rejected sports early on. I also don't understand people who like to watch sports for hours on end so I don't even watch it.


    Eye problem here too. So I'd run or wrestle. Not that I was really GOOD at either LOL.

    I don't get the sports team fans mentality. They spend tons of time and money on tickets, gambling, clothes, etc. They yell at TV screens when they get together, especially the Lesbians!

    They seldom play the sport, or ever have. And the teams aren't representative of the people who even live there! A Viking is just as likely to be from Florida....and lives there.
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    Jun 14, 2015 7:09 PM GMT
    timmm55 said
    UndercoverMan saidI have very bad eyesight so my eye had coordination sucked; therefore, I sucked at every sport. Attempting to play any sport was humiliating. I rejected sports early on. I also don't understand people who like to watch sports for hours on end so I don't even watch it.


    Eye problem here too. So I'd run or wrestle. Not that I was really GOOD at either LOL.

    I don't get the sports team fans mentality. They spend tons of time and money on tickets, gambling, clothes, etc. They yell at TV screens when they get together, especially the Lesbians!

    They seldom play the sport, or ever have. And the teams aren't representative of the people who even live there! A Viking is just as likely to be from Florida....and lives there.
    I don't understand the enjoyment people get from watching sports they don't participate in. And I certainly don't understand how "straight" guys can get so into a sport where a bunch of muscular guys in tight pants chase a scrotum-shaped ball.
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    Jun 14, 2015 7:55 PM GMT
    I have noticed that many gay guys tend to knock team sports, especially the meathead sports. A lot of us run away from things we don't understand or are uncomfortable with and then we minimize it's importance or dismiss it altogether to protect ourselves.

    For me, the teams/sports I root have formed some type of connection with me. I like the pace of the sport and the strategy. I usually like several players (might even have a man crush on them). During workouts, I might even mentally pretend I am one of those players actually playing the game. I find other fans who like the team and we talk about the season, big games that are coming up, our outlook, and our odds of winning the championship. I listen to the analysts break down facts or issues I may not be aware of or not understand. I might chat with other fans about competitors and players on other teams that might be a threat. I like going to the game live and being with other fans, rooting for the team.

    Some guys are into music or news or travel or gadgets. I'm into mountain biking, bourbon, scifi AND football. No big deal, there's room for all. No need to dismiss one over the other.

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    Jun 14, 2015 8:38 PM GMT
    woodfordr saidI have noticed that many gay guys tend to knock team sports, especially the meathead sports. A lot of us run away from things we don't understand or are uncomfortable with and then we minimize its importance or dismiss it altogether to protect ourselves.
    ...
    Some guys are into music or news or travel or gadgets. I'm into mountain biking, bourbon, scifi AND football. No big deal, there's room for all. No need to dismiss one over the other.


    If there's no need to dismiss one over the other then why begin by dismissing guys not into sports.

    Sounds a bit like the macho-medicine. It characterizes those not into sports as disordered. You've characterized those not into sports as lacking understanding or as being dismissive or defensive.

    Then while being dismissive of them, you add that there's "no need to dismiss one over the other" which seems out of agreement with yourself.

    If you think, well, to each their own even if their own is to not understand, then if you are not contradicting yourself, you are patronizing. Neither play seems a winning strategy.
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    Jun 14, 2015 8:44 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan said
    I have very bad eyesight so my eye had coordination sucked; therefore, I sucked at every sport. Attempting to play any sport was humiliating. I rejected sports early on. I also don't understand people who like to watch sports for hours on end so I don't even watch it.

    Me, too. My poor eyesight wasn't discovered until I was 9, but it was so bad that it was obvious that it had existed for a long time before. By then I had trouble developing my coordination late, and also had lost confidence in myself. Add to that my small stature and slight strength, and I simply avoided team sports.

    But as I entered my teens I had a kind of "Renaissance" with solo sports. I began very long all-day road bike tours at 13 on my derailleur, when my buddies were still riding tanky single-speed Schwinns no further than around the block.

    I took up tennis, and became our country club champ for my age group. My speed, technique and control made up for my lack of power and height. Even tried bowling out of curiosity, and mastered that, too. Easily going over 200 most games (my secret was to use a lighter but regulation 15-pound ball, that better matched my strength and gave me more control).

    Afterwards in the Army at 20 I discovered I was a deadeye shot, despite my early vision problems, best in my company, earning the top Expert rating with every weapon I touched. Took up skeet next, and discovered I was deadly there, too. Likewise when I turned to archery my aim again proved true.

    Oh, and in the Army I could "Max" the PT (physical fitness) test every time, when few other guys ever could, including all the ex-school-jock types who had shunned me in my teens. And I ran military obstacle courses in record time. Again, I exploited my light quickness, while the muscle guys were slow & lumbering.

    Moral: exploit your own abilities, and don't underrate yourself because you don't fit someone else's arbitrary standard of "sports". You may be much better than you think you are, but at something you haven't considered before.
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1277

    Jun 14, 2015 9:41 PM GMT
    timmm55 said
    UndercoverMan saidI have very bad eyesight so my eye had coordination sucked; therefore, I sucked at every sport. Attempting to play any sport was humiliating. I rejected sports early on. I also don't understand people who like to watch sports for hours on end so I don't even watch it.


    Eye problem here too. So I'd run or wrestle. Not that I was really GOOD at either LOL.

    I don't get the sports team fans mentality. They spend tons of time and money on tickets, gambling, clothes, etc. They yell at TV screens when they get together, especially the Lesbians!

    They seldom play the sport, or ever have. And the teams aren't representative of the people who even live there! A Viking is just as likely to be from Florida....and lives there.
    Maybe it's just because I grew up in Chicago, but this city is a true sports town. We also have had some really good teams: the Bulls dynasty in the early 90s with Michael Jordan, the White Sox winning the World Series, the Bears winning the Super Bowl, the Blackhawks winning the Stanley Cup in 2010, 2013, and hopefully 2015. The sports fanaticism is almost ingrained in every Chicagoan, it's part of our culture here.
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    Jun 15, 2015 2:48 AM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidI have very bad eyesight so my eye had coordination sucked; therefore, I sucked at every sport. Attempting to play any sport was humiliating. I rejected sports early on. I also don't understand people who like to watch sports for hours on end so I don't even watch it.


    Same issue I had and it wasnt until after i got glasses that i was apparently pretty good at baseball.
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    Jun 15, 2015 4:04 AM GMT
    JoshAlexander said
    UndercoverMan saidI have very bad eyesight so my eye had coordination sucked; therefore, I sucked at every sport. Attempting to play any sport was humiliating. I rejected sports early on. I also don't understand people who like to watch sports for hours on end so I don't even watch it.

    Same issue I had and it wasnt until after i got glasses that i was apparently pretty good at baseball.

    It broke my Father's heart when I was so bad at baseball. He was a big Yankees fan, had a First-Base box in Yankee Stadium, took me there all the time, I met all the Yankee greats of the 1950s. He dressed me in their team gear.

    My problem was undetected poor eyesight, too, as I wrote above. Kids weren't routinely tested for their eyes back then, even though my parents took me to see a pediatrician several times a year, for routine check-ups and shots. (Vaccines we take for granted now were just being introduced then, even after I started school, and required multiple "booster" shots)

    And yet kids today aren't always automatically tested for eyesight. I had to request it for my own sons. And being too young to read the eye chart alphabet isn't a reason any more.

    There are machines that can use reflectivity to passively estimate visual acuity. Many State driver's license offices now use them. So no reason every child shouldn't have their eyes tested at the earliest opportunity. And have as much opportunity at sports as any kid, as well as a richer view of the world around them.
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3384

    Jun 15, 2015 7:21 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidMy poor eyesight wasn't discovered until I was 9

    I always attributed me sucking at softball to being oversees when the kids transitioned from whiffleball (at which I was good). Maybe it was my vision that changed for the worse over that year (or a combination). I don't wear glasses (only got 1 pair in my life, in 7th grade; my vision isn't that bad, who needs to see street names when you have GPS?) but that might be why I drifted to sports with bigger balls (shush!).

    One of my nieces has a depth-perception problem so I've been more attuned to such issues lately. One of her class-mates also has an issue, and it was discovered late. The conversation went something like this:

    kid: Mom, a bug flew into my eye

    Mom: Which eye, honey?

    kid: the eye I can't see out of

    Mom: WHAT?!

    That was "normal" for the child.
  • mwolverine

    Posts: 3384

    Jun 15, 2015 7:26 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidThis cause caught my attention: Overly protective parents – some parents may discourage their children from playing sports for fear of injury.

    Yup. The reason I never made it to the NFL (lol) is that in 9th grade my older brother got hurt (nothing serious) playing football. Poof! There went my career, my parents wouldn't let me play. (And my brother played QB behind some kid named Harbaugh, so it's not like he got a lot of PT.)

    Now I cringe a little bit when my sister goes on about unsafe sports and how my nieces won't be allowed to participate (e.g. diving. It's just a matter of time before they smack their head on the board).
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    Jun 15, 2015 7:46 AM GMT
    mwolverine said
    paulflexes saidThis cause caught my attention: Overly protective parents – some parents may discourage their children from playing sports for fear of injury.

    Yup. The reason I never made it to the NFL (lol) is that in 9th grade my older brother got hurt (nothing serious) playing football. Poof! There went my career, my parents wouldn't let me play. (And my brother played QB behind some kid named Harbaugh, so it's not like he got a lot of PT.)

    Now I cringe a little bit when my sister goes on about unsafe sports and how my nieces won't be allowed to participate (e.g. diving. It's just a matter of time before they smack their head on the board).
    You overlooked my last paragraph. I'm now HIGHLY involved in extreme sports, and am currently training to do professional downhill and/or enduro mountain biking in my age group. Fuck injuries. Pain goes away once it stops hurting. icon_wink.gif
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    Jun 15, 2015 2:14 PM GMT
    not a lot of acceptance was a big limiting thing for me in high school. Later on i was a big loaner till i was like 40.

    after that i got interested in sport bikes. Got too many tickets on the street and started local racing. I had moderate skills in the short time i had.
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    Jun 15, 2015 4:38 PM GMT
    With me, it was definitely a lack of fitness as a kid. I spent most of my time at home playing video games, with the occasional game of tag with the other kids.

    I was HORRIFIC the first time I was forced to play basketball and football as a kid. I wasn't comfortable with it and it was embarrassing to be significantly worse than the other kids.

    I got over it though in junior high. We had a 3 on 3 basketball tournament , and I was the last guy chosen on my team. I trained hard and my teammates weren't assholes about me being on their team(not to my face at least) and we ended up doing pretty good. 2nd Overall out of the 9 teams and we only lost twice to the number one team. Changed my view on sports.

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    Jun 15, 2015 4:41 PM GMT
    woodfordr saidI have noticed that many gay guys tend to knock team sports, especially the meathead sports. A lot of us run away from things we don't understand or are uncomfortable with and then we minimize it's importance or dismiss it altogether to protect ourselves.

    For me, the teams/sports I root have formed some type of connection with me. I like the pace of the sport and the strategy. I usually like several players (might even have a man crush on them). During workouts, I might even mentally pretend I am one of those players actually playing the game. I find other fans who like the team and we talk about the season, big games that are coming up, our outlook, and our odds of winning the championship. I listen to the analysts break down facts or issues I may not be aware of or not understand. I might chat with other fans about competitors and players on other teams that might be a threat. I like going to the game live and being with other fans, rooting for the team.

    Some guys are into music or news or travel or gadgets. I'm into mountain biking, bourbon, scifi AND football. No big deal, there's room for all. No need to dismiss one over the other.



    You may have touched on something here.
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    Jun 15, 2015 8:18 PM GMT
    Same issue with the poor eyesight, it wasn't discovered until I was 8 and being picked last didn't exactly endear me to the idea of playing sports with kids who didn't want me around (though you should see those fat bald slobs now, thanks Facebook!), or joining little league. In today's pc world do they still let kids pick their teams, or are kids assigned at random by P.E. instructors?

    Oddly it wasn't until I was in college that I realized I was quite good at sports once I figured out the physics. (Imagine if I'd had YouTube then!) Had a P.E. instructor taken the time to adequately explain them to me my life would've been much different - but I suppose then, as well as probably now, they focus only on kids who are good.

    As for spectator sports watched for hours on end by people who don't even play it, I don't understand it but am frankly a little jealous from not a social but an intellectual level, in much the same way I am of people who are multilingual or great at poker. My inability to do it makes me feel inadequate; I don't feel more evolved by my perpetual disinterest but more stupid, as if there's some great puzzle that everyone else in the stadium can see that I can't, and are patient enough to solve but I'm not. That feeling of inadequacy nobody talks about.
  • FRE0

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    Jun 16, 2015 2:39 AM GMT
    In school, I got complimentary Cs in physical education. It was assumed by the PE teachers and my parents that I was not physically fit. Actually, that had nothing to do with it.

    On a long bicycle trip with three friends, when we got where we were going, all they wanted to do was rest whereas, after resting for only a few minutes, I wanted to do other things. In PE class we had to run one mile; I came in #2. In a strength contest, I won. So, my poor performance in PE class had nothing to do with a lack of fitness.

    The article fails to mention differential development. If a kid is not very good at some physical activity, his opportunities to improve are reduced. For example, if he is poor at catching a ball, then a ball will seldom be thrown to him and he will not improve whereas the others will improve.

    PE classes were suppose to be about fitness, but actually all we did was play games. The class period was about 55 minuted. Before playing a game, we had to take time to change to our gym clothes. Then, we had to listen to instruction and choose teams. After playing the game, we had to shower and change back to our street clothes. Obviously there was little time to do anything that might improve fitness.

    I couldn't throw a ball, catch a ball, dribble a ball, shoot baskets, etc. etc., but lack of fitness had nothing to do with it.

    So, although it is possible that a kid with coordination problems or poor fitness may not do well in PE, that may have little or nothing to do with the problem. PE classes were a fraud and may still be a fraud.
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    Jun 16, 2015 3:00 AM GMT
    FRE0 said... PE classes were a fraud and may still be a fraud.
    PE classes have always been a fraud and will always be a fraud as long as money is involved. I sucked at PE, and still suck at climbing hills on a bicycle, but shuttle us to the top of the mountain and race me downhill and I'll be at the bottom enjoying my second beer when you get there. icon_wink.gif
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    Jun 16, 2015 9:30 AM GMT
    eagermuscle said... Had a P.E. instructor taken the time to adequately explain them to me my life would've been much different - but I suppose then, as well as probably now, they focus only on kids who are good.

    ...


    Ah, yes, the P.E. instructors!!!! I read a few years ago of a study of the birthdays of professional athletes (I do not recall the specific details of which sport(s) involved.) Anyway, the result of the study was quite telling: A disproportionate number of the professional athletes had birthdays falling in the first quarter (Jan-Feb-Mar) of the calendar year as compared to the remaining quarters of the calendar year. Considering the growth patterns of children, the relative times of development of hand-eye coordination, and other developmental attributes (size, strength, etc.), those born in the first quarter of a calendar year typically started school in September of that same birth year and thus on their first day of school would be any where up to a year more biologically developed than a kid starting school in September whose 6th birthday would not be until that coming December.

    P.E. teachers as a group being "failed" pro athletes mentally, naturally would mentor the "best" athletic kids when ever they had a chance; thus, the pro athletes benefited from childhood with increased mentoring in addition to their biological birthdate developmental advantage.

    Interestingly, when I read that and thought back to my own school experiences and how the various P.E. teachers usually did favor certain students over others, which I had never really understood, this explanation made a lot of sense. The relative developmental differences were not evident to me with a child's perspective, but I can see now as an adult how such differences are pretty observable with an adult's perspective in observing a group of similarly aged children.
  • FRE0

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    Jun 17, 2015 3:38 AM GMT
    It would be better if PE concentrated on activities which promote physical fitness rather than on game playing skills which rarely improve the quality of life. The percentage of adults who play basketball, volleyball, etc., is really quite low so developing skills for those games serves no useful purpose for most kids. On the other hand, muscle strength and aerobic fitness convey real health benefits.

    A friend of mine did very poorly in high school PE. He was sufficiently traumatized that as an adult, he never engaged in significant physical activity. That changed when developed health problems. Then, with some difficulty, he overcame his fear of gyms and joined one. From working out in a gym and taking a couple long bicycle rides per week, he has greatly improved his health. If his high school PE classes had been designed to promote fitness rather than to encourage those with game skills to increase their skills while others made no progress, he would have been much better off.
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    Jun 17, 2015 3:57 AM GMT
    Sulla said
    eagermuscle said... Had a P.E. instructor taken the time to adequately explain them to me my life would've been much different - but I suppose then, as well as probably now, they focus only on kids who are good.

    ...


    Ah, yes, the P.E. instructors!!!! I read a few years ago of a study of the birthdays of professional athletes (I do not recall the specific details of which sport(s) involved.) Anyway, the result of the study was quite telling: A disproportionate number of the professional athletes had birthdays falling in the first quarter (Jan-Feb-Mar) of the calendar year as compared to the remaining quarters of the calendar year. Considering the growth patterns of children, the relative times of development of hand-eye coordination, and other developmental attributes (size, strength, etc.), those born in the first quarter of a calendar year typically started school in September of that same birth year and thus on their first day of school would be any where up to a year more biologically developed than a kid starting school in September whose 6th birthday would not be until that coming December.

    P.E. teachers as a group being "failed" pro athletes mentally, naturally would mentor the "best" athletic kids when ever they had a chance; thus, the pro athletes benefited from childhood with increased mentoring in addition to their biological birthdate developmental advantage.

    Interestingly, when I read that and thought back to my own school experiences and how the various P.E. teachers usually did favor certain students over others, which I had never really understood, this explanation made a lot of sense. The relative developmental differences were not evident to me with a child's perspective, but I can see now as an adult how such differences are pretty observable with an adult's perspective in observing a group of similarly aged children.

    Well, THAT explains it. I was born in November and started school early.