Running hot weather....

  • richy702

    Posts: 15

    Jun 20, 2015 2:23 AM GMT
    So I live in Las Vegas, Nevada and our weather gets extremely hot.
    I do most of my cardio by jogging 2-3 miles outside. I want to know do you guys think it's ok or safe to jog in hot weather?

    I wear sunblock to protect my skin but should I just stick to running at my gym? But I don't do that many miles ..
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2015 2:25 AM GMT
    My longest century ride (100 miles) was in 102 degrees, with a heat index of 115.
    Just drink shitloads of water and you'll be ok.
  • richy702

    Posts: 15

    Jun 20, 2015 3:20 AM GMT
    Okay ,
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 20, 2015 6:13 AM GMT
    That's the key, bro, I agree, just keep hydrating and hydrating some more.
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    Jun 20, 2015 4:36 PM GMT
    You should be drinking enough water that you definitely have to pee at the end of three miles. If your urine is dark yellow afterwards, DRINK MORE WATER
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jun 20, 2015 5:44 PM GMT
    Just the other day I rode my bicycle 26.5 miles. The temperature was 98F when I started and 93F when I finished, but the RH was probably about 20% or lower. I took plenty of water with me and drank often. Probably I averaged about one glass of water every 15 minutes which is about as fast as the stomach can absorb it. I weighed myself before and after and found that I had lost two pounds in spite of drinking all that water. But before starting, I drank about 1.5 glasses of water. I wasn't coasting along either; I was pushing myself, especially on hills where I pushed myself beyond a sustainable speed. I could have continued riding although I was somewhat tired.

    You can run in extreme heat. The safest way is to start drinking plenty of water about two hours before starting, but if you have too much water in your stomach your breathing will be affected and you may have trouble keeping the water down until it is absorbed.
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    Jun 20, 2015 9:41 PM GMT
    Carry, a camel backpack which I usually do to keep the hydration going, as long as you have a water going in you will be okay. Mix the water with Cellulor BCAA, it's an amino acid that helps with the intense workout of running.
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Jun 20, 2015 9:56 PM GMT
    If you`re born and raised in Nevada(or a similar state) you should be okay. As the other guys have posted, water is the key.
    Drink plenty, don`t wait to feel thirsty. Consume plenty before you start jogging.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jun 20, 2015 11:38 PM GMT
    uombroca saidCarry, a camel backpack which I usually do to keep the hydration going, as long as you have a water going in you will be okay. Mix the water with Cellulor BCAA, it's an amino acid that helps with the intense workout of running.


    A camel backpack could be helpful. One reason I haven't used one is that it would be difficult or impossible to know how much water I'm drinking which I would see as a possible problem. But, it seems to work well for you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 21, 2015 12:03 AM GMT
    I go at night when I am in Arizona. I start at sundown. When I am in SO cal any time is good. Just use SPF 80
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    Jun 21, 2015 3:54 AM GMT
    2bnaked saidI go at night when I am in Arizona. I start at sundown. When I am in SO cal any time is good. Just use SPF 80


    It's still 112 at sundown in AZ - sunrise is better as it's the coolest it will be that day. Maybe down to 95. No need for sunblock either.



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    Jun 21, 2015 5:43 AM GMT
    desertmuscl said
    2bnaked saidI go at night when I am in Arizona. I start at sundown. When I am in SO cal any time is good. Just use SPF 80


    It's still 112 at sundown in AZ - sunrise is better as it's the coolest it will be that day. Maybe down to 95. No need for sunblock either.





    Well, I run naked in the closed parks lol

    I go late sometimes, maybe 10:00 When the moon is out ......
    11p
    28
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  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Jun 21, 2015 5:48 AM GMT
    You might want to work up to it a little at a time
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    Jun 21, 2015 8:37 AM GMT
    Drink plenty of water. Try to jog around dawn/dusk if you are free during those hours.
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    Jun 21, 2015 10:36 AM GMT
    Might want to read this article


    http://www.runnersworld.com/hydration-dehydration/what-is-hyponatremia

    At the other end of the spectrum, overhydrating can be even more dangerous than not drinking enough. Hyponatremia occurs when your fluid intake exceeds your rate of fluid loss from sweating, which results in low blood-sodium levels. Symptoms--nausea, disorientation, muscle weakness--can be similar to dehydration. Giving additional liquids to hyponatremic runners only exacerbates the problem by diluting their blood-salt levels even more, which can lead to coma and, in the worst cases, death.
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    Jun 21, 2015 12:11 PM GMT
    If you find you're still sweating at the end of your runs, you're good. That means you're not dehydrated. However, if you start feeling cold and/or stop sweating, STOP RUNNING, it means you're dehydrated. If that happens, find some shade and sit down. If possible, get fluids in you - the alternative is passing out and finding yourself in the hospital with an IV in your arm.

    I'm a high school cross country/track coach and have escorted a couple athletes in the ambulance because of severe dehydration; and yes, they get the lecture to drink fluids on a regular basis, but some kids don't "get it" until too late.

    I suggest scouting out possible water sources on your most common routes and/or carrying water with you on the hotter days.
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    Jun 21, 2015 4:16 PM GMT
    I cant stand all the sun on summer in my country so I just run usually at 6am or 8.30pm...plus in the morning my local park as such a nice fresh air =)
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jun 21, 2015 8:06 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidYou might want to work up to it a little at a time


    Definitely!

    To a considerable extent, the body can adjust to the heat if given enough time to do so. When the body has adjusted to the heat, the sweat composition even changes so less salt is lost.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jun 21, 2015 8:20 PM GMT
    Corriamo saidMight want to read this article


    http://www.runnersworld.com/hydration-dehydration/what-is-hyponatremia

    At the other end of the spectrum, overhydrating can be even more dangerous than not drinking enough. Hyponatremia occurs when your fluid intake exceeds your rate of fluid loss from sweating, which results in low blood-sodium levels. Symptoms--nausea, disorientation, muscle weakness--can be similar to dehydration. Giving additional liquids to hyponatremic runners only exacerbates the problem by diluting their blood-salt levels even more, which can lead to coma and, in the worst cases, death.


    From the article:
    ""The new scientific evidence says that thirst will actually protect athletes from the hazards of both over- and underdrinking," says the IMMDA announcement."

    At best, that is an oversimplification. The other day when I rode my bicycle 26 miles in 90F+ heat, mostly in the sun, I lost two pounds even though I drank a lot of water. At no time did I feel thirsty. The times when I have consumed insufficient water I experienced symptoms of dehydration without ever feeling thirsty. The symptoms were headache, fatigue, and dark urine.

    In spite of what the article asserts, I fully believe that if one waits until one is thirsty before drinking water, one can become dehydrated. There is a limit to how fast the stomach can absorb water and if you wait until you are thirsty (and already dehydrated) before drinking water, your stomach may be unable to absorb water fast enough to recover from dehydration if you are sweating heavily. Drinking water faster than the stomach can absorb it causes other problems, i.e., difficulty breathing adequately and difficulty keeping the water down. It's hard to exercise vigorously while fighting regurgitation.

    Also, it is a mistake to assume that everyone is the same. Some people may not experience thirst until they are significantly dehydrated whereas others may experience thirst much sooner.

    Perhaps we all need to learn from experience how own bodies work and act accordingly.
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    Jun 22, 2015 3:29 AM GMT
    FRE0 saidThe times when I have consumed insufficient water I experienced symptoms of dehydration without ever feeling thirsty. The symptoms were headache, fatigue, and dark urine.

    Another thing to watch out for in the heat is hyperthermia, where your core temperature is too high. (Hypothermia is where it's too low.) I was running in hot weather and kept getting headaches afterward so I took my temperature with a rectal thermometer and it was over 100F; according to webmd a rectal reading should be 0.5 over normal temperature.

    An oral thermometer showed a low temperature, I'm guessing all of the panting through my mouth while running cooled my mouth down.
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    Jun 22, 2015 5:56 AM GMT
    FRE0 said
    uombroca saidCarry, a camel backpack which I usually do to keep the hydration going, as long as you have a water going in you will be okay. Mix the water with Cellulor BCAA, it's an amino acid that helps with the intense workout of running.


    A camel backpack could be helpful. One reason I haven't used one is that it would be difficult or impossible to know how much water I'm drinking which I would see as a possible problem. But, it seems to work well for you.
    camelbak-flow-meter-with-tube.jpg
  • neon4u

    Posts: 1152

    Jun 22, 2015 11:49 AM GMT
    Richy,
    Keep it simple. If you can, adjust the time of your run during the part of the day that has lower temperature. Don't buy a camel pack if your only running 2 or 3 miles - that's gear you don't need for short distances - just take a bottle of water. Other than that, if you feel hot during the run sip water n slow down your pace.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14379

    Jun 22, 2015 12:55 PM GMT
    neon4u saidRichy,
    Keep it simple. If you can, adjust the time of your run during the part of the day that has lower temperature. Don't buy a camel pack if your only running 2 or 3 miles - that's gear you don't need for short distances - just take a bottle of water. Other than that, if you feel hot during the run sip water n slow down your pace.
    Also don't over dress neither.icon_biggrin.gif Do what my buddy neon4u from San Diego does, run in a speedo or in skimpy short running shorts. icon_biggrin.gif Yes have a filled water bottle with you as well. Just don't run in a thong because some conservative nosy Rosie might call the cops on you.icon_cool.gif
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jun 22, 2015 4:06 PM GMT
    neon4u saidRichy,
    Keep it simple. If you can, adjust the time of your run during the part of the day that has lower temperature. Don't buy a camel pack if your only running 2 or 3 miles - that's gear you don't need for short distances - just take a bottle of water. Other than that, if you feel hot during the run sip water n slow down your pace.


    Water isn't necessary for only 2 or three miles. Pre-hydrating should be entirely adequate.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jun 22, 2015 4:08 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    FRE0 said
    uombroca saidCarry, a camel backpack which I usually do to keep the hydration going, as long as you have a water going in you will be okay. Mix the water with Cellulor BCAA, it's an amino acid that helps with the intense workout of running.


    A camel backpack could be helpful. One reason I haven't used one is that it would be difficult or impossible to know how much water I'm drinking which I would see as a possible problem. But, it seems to work well for you.
    camelbak-flow-meter-with-tube.jpg


    I never before saw one of those. It could be helpful.