Guys' nicknames

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    Jun 22, 2015 4:24 AM GMT
    I'm about to outdo even my usual level of random thread stupidity, but...

    If it's not obvious why I chose my profile name, everywhere I go in life, there is already a more relevant Phil in my social and/or work circles. Usually someone jokes that I'll be 'the other Phil', and someone else corrects them and points out that 'the other Phil is actually [some other Phil]'.

    This time, the real Phil is one of my bosses, a chief officer, and someone I have to interact with in writing in front of customers. Even if our last initials didn't look similar, it would still be awkward. So it got me to wondering whether I could pull off a new nickname, and even though I don't think I could, I then wondered where the variety of men's nicknames I've heard:

    * There's the shortened version of the first name, which often seems to happen organically, usually by early adulthood.

    * There's the middle name used instead of the first name; the guys I've known who do this have done so since early childhood. I considered it, but I don't much care for my own and its short version is even worse.

    * Then there's the non-name-based nickname that guys adopt in place of their birth names. The two that come most readily to mind are 'Bud' (unless that's short for 'Budward') and 'Butch' but there have to be more. I have no idea how many of these are taken on at an older age.

    * Sometimes I find out only after knowing a guy for a while that his given name doesn't coincide with the full name given to them by their parents. Some of these are for cultural reasons (if their name is difficult to pronounce/remember for English speakers, for example) and some for reasons I don't know -- perhaps like my own situation.

    Does anyone here know of examples where an adult man took on another name for personal or professional correspondence (preferably not just screen names or pen names)? Or go-to nicknames which are appropriate for avoiding confusion when someone else with your name is more central to your social network? Are there right or wrong ways to try to affect (a misuse of the word, I know) a different common name?

    Oh, and Pazzy, I won't try to steal Everett. It's a really good one though.
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    Jun 22, 2015 5:09 AM GMT
    Almost everyone I know has a nickname. The only ones that don't are people who are not close to the rest around them. For example in a workplace popular ones have nicknames while the introverted get called by their regular names or last names. There are some exceptions though.
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    Jun 22, 2015 5:20 AM GMT
    David666k saidAlmost everyone I know have nicknames. The only ones that don't are people who are not close to the rest around them. For example in a workplace popular ones have nicknames while the introverted get called by their regular names or last names. There are some exceptions though.


    Fascinating; that actually surprises me. I can only think of one plant I've worked at where it was common for people to go by nicknames for any reason other than making it easier for Americans who only spoke English.

    I wonder whether the reason is the surrounding culture/language, the type of industry, or the fact that the last few places I've worked have been too big with too much written correspondence to have a good rapport between coworkers.
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    Jun 22, 2015 5:24 AM GMT
    anotherphil said
    David666k saidAlmost everyone I know have nicknames. The only ones that don't are people who are not close to the rest around them. For example in a workplace popular ones have nicknames while the introverted get called by their regular names or last names. There are some exceptions though.


    Fascinating; that actually surprises me. I can only think of one plant I've worked at where it was common for people to go by nicknames for any reason other than making it easier for Americans who only spoke English.

    I wonder whether the reason is the surrounding culture/language, the type of industry, or the fact that the last few places I've worked have been too big with too much written correspondence to have a good rapport between coworkers.


    Well the surroundings are obviously a big factor. If you work dressed up in a suit for a big company I don't think they're officially calling you by a nickname. But whenever you are off work and meet your coworkers for a beer then nicknames naturally come up.

    At least that's been my experience since highschool, with my group of friends, workplace, etc.
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    Jun 22, 2015 6:15 AM GMT
    Actually Ive been thinking.. spanish is a language with much more room for nicknames than english.

    For starters we can shorten every name ie: Federico/Fede, Gonzalo/Gonza, Ismael/Isma. Or use diminutives like Pedro/Pedrito, Juan/Juanito. We can also shorten the diminutives! Pedri, Juani, etc!

    There are also names that have nicknames by default:

    A guy named Martín is isually called Tincho
    Francisco - Pancho
    Ignacio - Nacho
    José - Pepe
    Roberto - Tito
    Enrique - Quique
    Luis - Lucho
    Juan Manuel/ Juanma
    Juan Pablo / Juampa
    Etc....

    Anyways there are many ways to call someone. That's why it's rare to find people with no nicknames in spanish, so yeah I guess it's a cultural thing.



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    Jun 22, 2015 6:35 AM GMT
    David666k saidActually Ive been thinking.. spanish is a language with much more room for nicknames than english.

    For starters we can shorten every name ie: Federico/Fede, Gonzalo/Gonza, Ismael/Isma. Or use diminutives like Pedro/Pedrito, Juan/Juanito. We can also shorten the diminutives! Pedri, Juani, etc!

    There are also names that have nicknames by default:

    A guy named Martín is isually called Tincho
    Francisco - Pancho
    Ignacio - Nacho
    Roberto - Tito
    Enrique - Quique
    Luis - Lucho
    Juan Manuel/ Juanma
    Juan Pablo / Juampa
    Etc....

    Anyways there are many ways to call someone. That's why it's rare to find people with no nicknames in spanish, so yeah I guess it's a cultural thing.


    That explains a lot of names I've heard; very interesting indeed!

    Pancho was the most surprising; I don't get that one at all. I looked up Tito Puente just out of curiosity, and he was "Ernesto Antonio" Puente, so either the name had layers of meaning or Tito is flexible enough to work with different names.

    Very cool, though. Too bad I almost certainly can't pull off a Spanish nickname. Anything for Felipe?
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    Jun 22, 2015 6:38 AM GMT
    anotherphil saidToo bad I almost certainly can't pull off a Spanish nickname. Anything for Felipe?
    How about Phil Anthrow Pissed? icon_razz.gif
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    Jun 22, 2015 6:47 AM GMT
    anotherphil said
    David666k saidActually Ive been thinking.. spanish is a language with much more room for nicknames than english.

    For starters we can shorten every name ie: Federico/Fede, Gonzalo/Gonza, Ismael/Isma. Or use diminutives like Pedro/Pedrito, Juan/Juanito. We can also shorten the diminutives! Pedri, Juani, etc!

    There are also names that have nicknames by default:

    A guy named Martín is isually called Tincho
    Francisco - Pancho
    Ignacio - Nacho
    Roberto - Tito
    Enrique - Quique
    Luis - Lucho
    Juan Manuel/ Juanma
    Juan Pablo / Juampa
    Etc....

    Anyways there are many ways to call someone. That's why it's rare to find people with no nicknames in spanish, so yeah I guess it's a cultural thing.


    That explains a lot of names I've heard; very interesting indeed!

    Pancho was the most surprising; I don't get that one at all. I looked up Tito Puente just out of curiosity, and he was "Ernesto Antonio" Puente, so either the name had layers of meaning or Tito is flexible enough to work with different names.

    Very cool, though. Too bad I almost certainly can't pull off a Spanish nickname. Anything for Felipe?


    Tito Puentes comes from the end of the diminutive of Ernesto: ErnesTITO. Just like a Rodolfo might be called Fito (Rodolfito). Yeah we might use the beggining or the end of a name or a nickname to make sub-nicknames lol.

    Felipe - Pipe, Feli or Felo. The diminutive 'Felipito' is not used because its too long and 'pito' means dick so its not used either.
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    Jun 22, 2015 7:03 AM GMT
    David666k said
    anotherphil said
    David666k saidActually Ive been thinking.. spanish is a language with much more room for nicknames than english.

    For starters we can shorten every name ie: Federico/Fede, Gonzalo/Gonza, Ismael/Isma. Or use diminutives like Pedro/Pedrito, Juan/Juanito. We can also shorten the diminutives! Pedri, Juani, etc!

    There are also names that have nicknames by default:

    A guy named Martín is isually called Tincho
    Francisco - Pancho
    Ignacio - Nacho
    Roberto - Tito
    Enrique - Quique
    Luis - Lucho
    Juan Manuel/ Juanma
    Juan Pablo / Juampa
    Etc....

    Anyways there are many ways to call someone. That's why it's rare to find people with no nicknames in spanish, so yeah I guess it's a cultural thing.


    That explains a lot of names I've heard; very interesting indeed!

    Pancho was the most surprising; I don't get that one at all. I looked up Tito Puente just out of curiosity, and he was "Ernesto Antonio" Puente, so either the name had layers of meaning or Tito is flexible enough to work with different names.

    Very cool, though. Too bad I almost certainly can't pull off a Spanish nickname. Anything for Felipe?


    Tito Puentes comes from the end of the diminutive of Ernesto: ErnesTITO. Just like a Rodolfo might be called Fito (Rodolfito). Yeah we might use the beggining or the end of a name or a nickname to make a sub-nicknames lol.

    Felipe - Pipe, Feli or Felo.


    I see; that makes sense. Robertito has a natural rhythm and balance to it, so it makes sense that it would naturally lead to Tito.

    Too bad I'm too bland to pull off any of the Felipe derivations. I'd be more believable as "Pip" than Pipe. :S
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    Jun 22, 2015 7:11 AM GMT
    Here are some other ideas. Got em from Wikipedia icon_smile.gif

    "Philip has many alternative spellings, many of them with two Ls (such as Phillips, mostly found as a surname), and also has many diminutive (or hypocoristic forms) including Phil, Flip, Feli, Philly, Lip, Pep or Peps, and Pippo. There are also feminine forms such as Philippine, Philippa. Additionally, there is also; Philippe"

    Flip sounds pretty cool. Or Pippo .But if you want to sound fancy (and French) use Phillipe
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    Jun 22, 2015 7:37 AM GMT
    My dad apparently went by "Flip" in college. I can't think of the name without picturing the dorky old pictures of him and his brothers and/or classmates in the 70s. icon_lol.gif

    Peps and Pippo are pretty hilarious, but as with the Spanish derivatives, they sound a little too hip and/or retro for me to pull off. Maybe after I've been at this job another six months or so, and have enough history to offset the affectation. icon_wink.gif
  • ASHDOD

    Posts: 1057

    Jun 22, 2015 11:56 AM GMT
    when my cousin came to Israel he had a problem ,his name is German [Herman in English],and in Spanish [he came from Argentina]the g is pronounced like in the word ''loch ness''
    in Hebrew German pronounced like this sounds like the word ''horny'icon_lol.gif so professionally he uses his second name Fabio.
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    Jun 22, 2015 12:21 PM GMT
    I actually really do go by Kodiak, in my professional and personal life. I'm from Alaska, I love bears, and I also love bears.

    Three meanings in one. Get creative!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 22, 2015 1:42 PM GMT
    You within your legal right to change your name. Pick a name you like and go for it. Or just use it without changing it legally. You have every right to insist people call you whatever you want.

  • Antarktis

    Posts: 213

    Jun 22, 2015 1:44 PM GMT
    There's always the initialization..P.J.
  • WrestlerBoy

    Posts: 1903

    Jun 22, 2015 1:45 PM GMT
    Awesomepossum saidHere are some other ideas. Got em from Wikipedia icon_smile.gif

    "Philip has many alternative spellings, many of them with two Ls (such as Phillips, mostly found as a surname), and also has many diminutive (or hypocoristic forms) including Phil, Flip, Feli, Philly, Lip, Pep or Peps, and Pippo. There are also feminine forms such as Philippine, Philippa. Additionally, there is also; Philippe"

    Flip sounds pretty cool. Or Pippo .But if you want to sound fancy (and French) use Phillipe


    And it "means" "Lover of Horses.." ("phil....hippus").
  • WrestlerBoy

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    Jun 22, 2015 1:48 PM GMT
    Ashdod said when my cousin came to Israel he had a problem ,his name is German [Herman in English],and in Spanish [he came from Argentina]the g is pronounced like in the word ''loch ness''
    in Hebrew German pronounced like this sounds like the word ''horny'icon_lol.gif so professionally he uses his second name Fabio.


    And the word "German", means "related", as in "close familial/tribal member". You still see this in the English phrase, "My cousin german" (meaning my first - closest - cousin). This is why "German" becomes "HERMANO" in Spanish. "Mi primo HERMANO"....exactly the same phrase..."cousin german".
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    Jun 22, 2015 2:11 PM GMT
    I don't recall having any nicknames recently, but it is very common among my friends and people at work.

    There were 3 jasons I knew that all hanged out together and they had stupid nicknames.

    Fat Jay
    Pimples
    Gayson


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    Jun 22, 2015 4:52 PM GMT
    I was always curious, but in a positive way, why people started calling me Mikey about the time I turned 50, when Mike had always worked until then. It seems to be a good thing, but I'd like to know why it didn't kick in until then. People never called me that in any of my younger years.
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    Jun 22, 2015 5:04 PM GMT
    My parents mostly addressed me as "Robert", rather formally. If my Mother ever called me "Robert James!" I knew I was in big trouble, and I tried to hide under my bed. LOL!

    When I attempted to say my own name I was so shy I half swallowed it, so it sounded like "Robber". Adults I met would cruelly say: "Robber? Are you a thief?" Only making my shyness worse.

    My solution was to rename myself "Bob", something I could pronounce without fault. I use it to this day.

    When I lived in Alabama, BTW, my Robert James was rechristened to "Bobbie Jim". Everyone down there has those kinds of double names. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jun 22, 2015 7:13 PM GMT
    Antarktis saidThere's always the initialization..P.J.

    My first name starts with an R. My nieces started calling me You Are; I didn't realize that they were calling me U R; they got the idea from the movie Uncle Bud where his nephew and/or niece called him U B. My brother and their mother call me U R as well. I like the ambiguity and confusion between the letters U R and the words You Are.

    Then there was when I was a volunteer puppy raiser for a non-profit. The dogs came named; often the names were from donors or whatnot. I had the choice of two names for a new puppy, one of which was Bob-Joe, and I was telling a woman friend of mine that I passed on it because it seemed a bit much. She remarked that I could have just called the dog BJ, and I was like, um, no, I don't think so. Turns out that many women don't know what BJ means like we guys do.
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    Jun 23, 2015 1:58 AM GMT
    Wow. So many fun responses!

    @ASHDOD: I mostly knew this phenomenon from Chinese friends and coworkers. At least this guy had a cool middle name!

    @Kodiak: I've admired your choice of screen names in the past, but never imagined you used it IRL too. Very cool.

    @UndercoverMan: I agree, but I don't plan to insist on anything. If I come up with something I like, I'd like to be able to offer it up casually (or in writing as a quoted middle name) as an option.

    @Antarktis: I really want to escape that fate (P.J. in my case would be Phil Jr.) but I may have no choice. ;)

    @WrestlerBoy: My cousins used to make fun of me for that, which I didn't really get; *they* were the ones with horses. Though I suppose I was a bit envious.

    @tmac2271: I can only hope those names were bestowed in respect and good humor! I think I can be glad I don't have options like those to choose from. ;)

    @MGINSD: I've been running across a few adult diminutives recently too. I wonder if it's a sign of defiant attitudes toward aging, along the lines of the various " is the new " quips my friends like to throw around whenever someone approaches another milestone.

    @Art_Deco: It was "Phillip Allen" for me. Works very well for browbeating a little boy. "Phil Al" makes for a miserable attempt at a southern name though. icon_biggrin.gif

    @Lumpyoatmeal: A friend of mine had the opposite experience a few years ago. He couldn't figure out why his wife and her girlfriends were always going on about Bon Jovi; they seemed too young to be into his music. Eventually she clued him in. icon_lol.gif
  • Descamisado

    Posts: 95

    Jun 23, 2015 6:40 AM GMT
    I worked with a guy who asked to be called "Skeets." Don't know where it came from (his name was Richard) but it's short, memorable, and masculine - so it's hard to find fault with it.

    I also had a childhood friend who went by "Skeeter," but that does have "little boy" written all over it.

    In another workplace there was a guy who was so fond of fish tacos we called him "Sharky." Do you have any food preferences you can draw on? icon_biggrin.gif

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    Jun 23, 2015 7:20 AM GMT
    I forgot Skeeter! I may have to float that one as a joke to see if anyone responds. icon_biggrin.gif

    Most of my food preferences are ethnic in various ways, and my workplace is very diverse, so I'd be marked as a poser almost immediately if I tried to assume a related nickname, but it's very fertile ground. I'll have to give that some thought.
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    Jun 23, 2015 1:34 PM GMT
    Let me add something about the Thai culture regarding nicknames. Thai people use nicknames in their daily life and in all informal settings. They're given nicknames at birth by their parents, along with their first names. Thai nicknames are neither registered nor official, but it's uncommon for a person to change his/her nickname. The use of nicknames is prevalent; the media even often refer to celebrities and politicians by their nicknames.

    A Thai nickname can be derived from a syllable in the first name. For example, a woman called Sudarat may have Da as her nickname, or a man called Teeraparp may have Tee as his. More often than not though, nicknames are totally unrelated to first names. They can be meaningful or meaningless. And in the former case all sorts of nouns and adjectives are used. They can be funny when translated into English, eg 'Fat' ('Uan' in Thai) or 'Pig' ('Moo' in Thai); or when transliterated, eg 'Porn' (meaning 'blessing'). Natalie Glebova, who won Miss Universe 2005 and is very much loved by Thai people, has adopted the nickname 'Fa' (meaning 'sky') when living in Thailand. I guess someone suggested to her that nickname because 'Nang Fa' (literally 'miss sky') means 'fairy' and Thai people liken a beautiful woman to a fairy. My nickname is Tik, which unfortunately means crystal meth in South African English. icon_biggrin.gif