Swimming~

  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 23, 2015 10:59 AM GMT
    I was just wondering if anyone here swims regularly and wouldn't mind sharing the improvements or changes it had on your body. Like...did it help build your abs? Did it broaden your shoulders?

    I am planning to swim 3-4 times per week starting this week and I'm still learning how to do the front crawl properly, but I know how to do the frog stroke. I just wanted to know if it is possible to achieve a body like Michael Phelps by just swimming? Will I get a swimmer's body? If so, how long do you think it would take? What swimming style should I primarily use?

    And just out of curiosity, what swimming style do you normally use and maybe why? For me, I like doing the backstroke, it's the easiest and most relaxing of all lol.

    Michael Phelps icon_redface.gif
    375246c985526aba5ad616213c16a72e.jpg
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14380

    Jun 23, 2015 1:05 PM GMT
    aviddoc saidI was just wondering if anyone here swims regularly and wouldn't mind sharing the improvements or changes it had on your body. Like...did it help build your abs? Did it broaden your shoulders?

    I am planning to swim 3-4 times per week starting this week and I'm still learning how to do the front crawl properly, but I know how to do the frog stroke. I just wanted to know if it is possible to achieve a body like Michael Phelps by just swimming? Will I get a swimmer's body? If so, how long do you think it would take? What swimming style should I primarily use?

    And just out of curiosity, what swimming style do you normally use and maybe why? For me, I like doing the backstroke, it's the easiest and most relaxing of all lol.

    Michael Phelps icon_redface.gif
    375246c985526aba5ad616213c16a72e.jpg
    Michael Phelps is an awesome, top notch athlete but unfortunately he is also the prince of bong hits. I guess that helped him escape the reality of being originally from deeply distressed Baltimore.
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    Jun 23, 2015 1:50 PM GMT
    The frog stroke? What's that, like a toad heart attack? Frog kick, maybe?
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    Jun 23, 2015 3:22 PM GMT
    Swimming itself, unless done under a competitive regimen, will not lead to Phelps' buffnicity, but it's a great way to condition your body overall and tone your muscles. I swim at least 1500m on alternate days, combining free, breast, side, and back stroke; it takes me abot 40 minutes. Add biking, some weights, and running/jogging/walking, and you'll have a good workout that will be enjoyable as well. Look for results anywhere from 4-6 months, but done't expect to get chiseled unless you add some defining stretch and weight exercises, too.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jun 23, 2015 3:28 PM GMT
    Outstanding for a whole host of reasons, I think everybody should know how to swim, should an emergency presents itself and one finds themselves in the water. Great cardio exercise. One of our guests on my weekly fitness program called it "the best exercise one can get". I just know it can be a great addition to any fitness program and I love it!
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    Jun 23, 2015 4:33 PM GMT
    I also incorporate sidestroke into laps and I've never seen or heard of anyone else who does until MG just mentioned. It's great for realigning the bod, especially if a back goes out and I've got some issues with discs. It's also good for forearms. Another one real good for forearms that I do each swim is a variation on the elementary backstroke only I don't bring my arms up to shoulders, just at my side combined with frog kick. That works forearms and abdomen and it lets my face tan and gives me a break from goggles.

    I'm still on my roller coaster of fighting depression so slacked off for a bit but am back at my swims now, still not up to par as far as I'm concerned but just the other day the master's swim coach at the pool asked me to sign up. I thanked him graciously and told him I'd consider it in the future after I get my swims back. I guess he thought I was up to it but for now I think I'd just make a fool of myself on his team. Still, felt good to be asked.

    And as mentioned you still need weights with swim because after you get to a certain point, you'll just want more power to your stroke. But also you don't overwork weights like a body builder would. If your arms get too big they won't move right through the water.

    Oh, and PS, somewhat amusing. I think the other reason you hardly ever see body builder swimmers is their lack of body fat which serves as a floatation devise. It's not that they can't swim, but that they are so easy to sink.
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    Jun 23, 2015 10:42 PM GMT
    Swimming laps is a great work out. And in answer to your questions:

    1) Will swimming help my abs? Yes
    2) Broaden my shoulders? Yes
    3) Give me swimmer's body? Yes
    4) How long? You could start seeing results and improvements in your look within weeks.
    5) What style? Mainly, the Butterfly, Crawl & Breast strokes.

    I started playing water polo in high school, and got good enough to play on my college team throughout my undergrad years. I started out as a skinny bean pole kid, and worked myself into a much better looking body. The coaching/training staff in water polo put us all through kick-but sessions. We would lift, and then swim after our work outs, when our muscles were tired.

    Some things we learned: Keep your head down while swimming, spinning to the side while breathing. Do flutter kicks clear across the pool wearing flippers, as an alternative to the strokes I mentioned above. Swim for 15 minutes without stopping, and up it to 20 minutes. Work up to swimming 1000 yards in 20 minutes.

    A good work out: Swim 50 to 100 yards. Get out and do 10 pull ups, 30 push ups and 20 incline crunches and then hit the pool again. If you do this 3 times weekly (or daily if you can) you will be very happy with your body after a few weeks. You'll be even happier (and feel amazing) in a few months. Keep it up for life (like I have) and you'll look your best even in your 50's! Good luck!
  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 23, 2015 11:47 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidMichael Phelps is an awesome, top notch athlete but unfortunately he is also the prince of bong hits. I guess that helped him escape the reality of being originally from deeply distressed Baltimore.


    icon_lol.gif I didn't know he smoked! I don't really care, but I feel bad for him for how some people reacted. I also just found out that he had drinking and driving problems. I guess he doesn't care too much about his image.
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1279

    Jun 23, 2015 11:50 PM GMT
    I have been swimming since I was a little kid. My mom put me in swimming lessons at around age 5. I have loved swimming my whole life. Worked as a lifeguard in high school and college. Before a rotator cuff injury about 3 years ago, I was swimming around 500 laps a week. My shoulder seems to finally be getting better, so I am going back to swimming and trying to build up slowly. For me swimming is not just physical, but mental. Gliding through that cool blue water is a great form of relaxation. To answer the OP's original question, yes, I did see it change my body. In addition to the swimming I was doing spinning and using weights. I was on the verge of getting ripped, and then my injury happened. Swimming, in addition to other forms of exercise I think is the best way to get the results you are looking for.
  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 23, 2015 11:55 PM GMT
    theantijock saidThe frog stroke? What's that, like a toad heart attack? Frog kick, maybe?


    lol I think it's also called the breaststroke. I like calling it the "frog" stroke, it makes more sense to me.
  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 24, 2015 12:11 AM GMT
    MGINSD saidSwimming itself, unless done under a competitive regimen, will not lead to Phelps' buffnicity, but it's a great way to condition your body overall and tone your muscles. I swim at least 1500m on alternate days, combining free, breast, side, and back stroke; it takes me abot 40 minutes. Add biking, some weights, and running/jogging/walking, and you'll have a good workout that will be enjoyable as well. Look for results anywhere from 4-6 months, but done't expect to get chiseled unless you add some defining stretch and weight exercises, too.


    I'm going to worry about weights after I make swimming a regular thing. I don't really know where to start though...How many laps did you swim when you just started? How long did it take you swim 1500m!?
  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 24, 2015 12:21 AM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidOutstanding for a whole host of reasons, I think everybody should know how to swim, should an emergency presents itself and one finds themselves in the water. Great cardio exercise. One of our guests on my weekly fitness program called it "the best exercise one can get". I just know it can be a great addition to any fitness program and I love it!


    I agree! I enjoy it far more than running and I can get my cardio from swimming without the risk of hurting myself often. I can't understand how people would hate it, like my Mom...I'd understand if they had a traumatic experience.
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    Jun 24, 2015 1:07 AM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    aviddoc saidI was just wondering if anyone here swims regularly and wouldn't mind sharing the improvements or changes it had on your body. Like...did it help build your abs? Did it broaden your shoulders?

    I am planning to swim 3-4 times per week starting this week and I'm still learning how to do the front crawl properly, but I know how to do the frog stroke. I just wanted to know if it is possible to achieve a body like Michael Phelps by just swimming? Will I get a swimmer's body? If so, how long do you think it would take? What swimming style should I primarily use?

    And just out of curiosity, what swimming style do you normally use and maybe why? For me, I like doing the backstroke, it's the easiest and most relaxing of all lol.

    Michael Phelps icon_redface.gif
    375246c985526aba5ad616213c16a72e.jpg
    Michael Phelps is an awesome, top notch athlete but unfortunately he is also the prince of bong hits. I guess that helped him escape the reality of being originally from deeply distressed Baltimore.


    Unfortunately? Weed isn't the devil's lettuce - especially since Phelps still managed to be a top-notch Olympic athlete. Chill out and rip a hit yourself.
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    Jun 24, 2015 1:48 AM GMT
    What'd I get?

    Weight loss.
    Tighter skin.
    Sinus infections until I switched to a saltwater pool.
    No dry skin or wrecked hair because I used anti-chlorine TriSwim products.
    I never noticed any appreciable difference in my shoulders or lats from strictly swimming.
  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 24, 2015 3:31 AM GMT
    theantijock saidI also incorporate sidestroke into laps and I've never seen or heard of anyone else who does until MG just mentioned. It's great for realigning the bod, especially if a back goes out and I've got some issues with discs. It's also good for forearms. Another one real good for forearms that I do each swim is a variation on the elementary backstroke only I don't bring my arms up to shoulders, just at my side combined with frog kick. That works forearms and abdomen and it lets my face tan and gives me a break from goggles.

    I'm still on my roller coaster of fighting depression so slacked off for a bit but am back at my swims now, still not up to par as far as I'm concerned but just the other day the master's swim coach at the pool asked me to sign up. I thanked him graciously and told him I'd consider it in the future after I get my swims back. I guess he thought I was up to it but for now I think I'd just make a fool of myself on his team. Still, felt good to be asked.

    And as mentioned you still need weights with swim because after you get to a certain point, you'll just want more power to your stroke. But also you don't overwork weights like a body builder would. If your arms get too big they won't move right through the water.

    Oh, and PS, somewhat amusing. I think the other reason you hardly ever see body builder swimmers is their lack of body fat which serves as a floatation devise. It's not that they can't swim, but that they are so easy to sink.


    Now that you mentioned it, I never really did see body builders around when I was swimming before lol! I imagine they wouldn't really look sexy when they swim especially if they're constantly trying to stay afloat lol. Good thing I'm not planning to get ripped, but I guess I still need to lift weights...oh well.

    I hope you recover soon from your depression and maybe join your coach's team when you're ready. I don't know what you're going through right now, but I think it's nice to be part of a team and be surrounded with people of the same interests. Anyway, what do I know...Good Luck!
  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 24, 2015 3:41 AM GMT
    Jockbod48 saidSwimming laps is a great work out. And in answer to your questions:

    1) Will swimming help my abs? Yes
    2) Broaden my shoulders? Yes
    3) Give me swimmer's body? Yes
    4) How long? You could start seeing results and improvements in your look within weeks.
    5) What style? Mainly, the Butterfly, Crawl & Breast strokes.

    I started playing water polo in high school, and got good enough to play on my college team throughout my undergrad years. I started out as a skinny bean pole kid, and worked myself into a much better looking body. The coaching/training staff in water polo put us all through kick-but sessions. We would lift, and then swim after our work outs, when our muscles were tired.

    Some things we learned: Keep your head down while swimming, spinning to the side while breathing. Do flutter kicks clear across the pool wearing flippers, as an alternative to the strokes I mentioned above. Swim for 15 minutes without stopping, and up it to 20 minutes. Work up to swimming 1000 yards in 20 minutes.

    A good work out: Swim 50 to 100 yards. Get out and do 10 pull ups, 30 push ups and 20 incline crunches and then hit the pool again. If you do this 3 times weekly (or daily if you can) you will be very happy with your body after a few weeks. You'll be even happier (and feel amazing) in a few months. Keep it up for life (like I have) and you'll look your best even in your 50's! Good luck!


    Thanks jockbod48! That was very informative! I would give you stars or likes for your answer but I'm afraid realjock hasn't implemented anything of the sort...Now I have a workout routine I can try out, Many Thanks!
  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 24, 2015 3:54 AM GMT
    eagermuscle saidWhat'd I get?

    Weight loss.
    Tighter skin.
    Sinus infections until I switched to a saltwater pool.
    No dry skin or wrecked hair because I used anti-chlorine TriSwim products.
    I never noticed any appreciable difference in my shoulders or lats from strictly swimming.


    icon_confused.gif But...you have a great body!
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    Jun 24, 2015 5:31 AM GMT
    aviddoc said
    MGINSD saidSwimming itself, unless done under a competitive regimen, will not lead to Phelps' buffnicity, but it's a great way to condition your body overall and tone your muscles. I swim at least 1500m on alternate days, combining free, breast, side, and back stroke; it takes me abot 40 minutes. Add biking, some weights, and running/jogging/walking, and you'll have a good workout that will be enjoyable as well. Look for results anywhere from 4-6 months, but done't expect to get chiseled unless you add some defining stretch and weight exercises, too.


    I'm going to worry about weights after I make swimming a regular thing. I don't really know where to start though...How many laps did you swim when you just started? How long did it take you swim 1500m!?


    I've always swam as far back as I can remember, and did so competitively in HS and college. Ironically, I didn't swim when I was in the USN, but when I got out I got back into it by doing at least 400 yds., and then increasing it from there. Start wherever you're comfortably able to swim w/o interruption, and then push yourself to do at least a 400 from there, working upwards later. I do sidestroke to keep my lifesaving skills intact, which came in handy several years ago when I saved my nephew's life after he was caught in an undertow and panicked. It's great for the side muscles, whatever they're called!
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    Jun 24, 2015 7:14 AM GMT
    I'm a swimmer too and while you have received some valuable info from the guys on this site, the one piece of advice I can give is watch what you eat. Swimming burns a lot of calories and there will be times that you feel like you can eat anything in site. Choose the wrong food, then all of your swimming efforts are wasted.
  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 24, 2015 7:34 AM GMT
    ChicagoSteve saidI have been swimming since I was a little kid. My mom put me in swimming lessons at around age 5. I have loved swimming my whole life. Worked as a lifeguard in high school and college. Before a rotator cuff injury about 3 years ago, I was swimming around 500 laps a week. My shoulder seems to finally be getting better, so I am going back to swimming and trying to build up slowly. For me swimming is not just physical, but mental. Gliding through that cool blue water is a great form of relaxation. To answer the OP's original question, yes, I did see it change my body. In addition to the swimming I was doing spinning and using weights. I was on the verge of getting ripped, and then my injury happened. Swimming, in addition to other forms of exercise I think is the best way to get the results you are looking for.


    I agree, nothing helps me relax better than swimming. It's the healthiest way for me to blow off some steam and I've always been in love with swimming as long as I can remember. I'm sorry you had that injury, it must have been awful...I'm sure it's not too late to get back to your old workout routine and get ripped! icon_wink.gif But still take it easy!
  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 24, 2015 7:48 AM GMT
    MGINSD saidI've always swam as far back as I can remember, and did so competitively in HS and college. Ironically, I didn't swim when I was in the USN, but when I got out I got back into it by doing at least 400 yds., and then increasing it from there. Start wherever you're comfortably able to swim w/o interruption, and then push yourself to do at least a 400 from there, working upwards later. I do sidestroke to keep my lifesaving skills intact, which came in handy several years ago when I saved my nephew's life after he was caught in an undertow and panicked. It's great for the side muscles, whatever they're called!


    They're called oblique muscles, I googled it for you icon_wink.gif, least I can do for the valuable advice you've given. And kudos for saving your nephew's life! I wasn't planning to learn sidestroke until now, I didn't think it would be so useful...apparently it is!
  • aviddoc

    Posts: 49

    Jun 24, 2015 7:56 AM GMT
    Erik101 saidI'm a swimmer too and while you have received some valuable info from the guys on this site, the one piece of advice I can give is watch what you eat. Swimming burns a lot of calories and there will be times that you feel like you can eat anything in site. Choose the wrong food, then all of your swimming efforts are wasted.


    Maybe it's just me or maybe I'm not swimming hard enough, but I don't really eat a lot after swimming...icon_redface.gif but what kinds of food are wrong?
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14380

    Jun 24, 2015 12:56 PM GMT
    zd394 said
    roadbikeRob said
    aviddoc saidI was just wondering if anyone here swims regularly and wouldn't mind sharing the improvements or changes it had on your body. Like...did it help build your abs? Did it broaden your shoulders?

    I am planning to swim 3-4 times per week starting this week and I'm still learning how to do the front crawl properly, but I know how to do the frog stroke. I just wanted to know if it is possible to achieve a body like Michael Phelps by just swimming? Will I get a swimmer's body? If so, how long do you think it would take? What swimming style should I primarily use?

    And just out of curiosity, what swimming style do you normally use and maybe why? For me, I like doing the backstroke, it's the easiest and most relaxing of all lol.

    Michael Phelps icon_redface.gif
    375246c985526aba5ad616213c16a72e.jpg
    Michael Phelps is an awesome, top notch athlete but unfortunately he is also the prince of bong hits. I guess that helped him escape the reality of being originally from deeply distressed Baltimore.


    Unfortunately? Weed isn't the devil's lettuce - especially since Phelps still managed to be a top-notch Olympic athlete. Chill out and rip a hit yourself.
    No thank you. Weed is highly carcinogenic. I would much rather swim, run, or ride my road bike.icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jun 24, 2015 5:32 PM GMT
    aviddoc said
    MGINSD saidI've always swam as far back as I can remember, and did so competitively in HS and college. Ironically, I didn't swim when I was in the USN, but when I got out I got back into it by doing at least 400 yds., and then increasing it from there. Start wherever you're comfortably able to swim w/o interruption, and then push yourself to do at least a 400 from there, working upwards later. I do sidestroke to keep my lifesaving skills intact, which came in handy several years ago when I saved my nephew's life after he was caught in an undertow and panicked. It's great for the side muscles, whatever they're called!


    They're called oblique muscles, I googled it for you icon_wink.gif, least I can do for the valuable advice you've given. And kudos for saving your nephew's life! I wasn't planning to learn sidestroke until now, I didn't think it would be so useful...apparently it is!


    I'm going back many decades now but if I recall my childhood lifesaving lessons, there are two sidestrokes, the normal one I usually do but also for lifesaving there's a different one with an inverted scissor kick so as to not punish the victim being saved. I'm gonna try that at the pool today and see if I've remembered that right. Maybe it even works different muscles. Might be good to switch that out for a few laps, not unlike alternating breathing sides.

    As to eating. I definitely get hungry after swims and often do a fruited protein shake.
  • interesting

    Posts: 584

    Jun 24, 2015 9:04 PM GMT
    I say go for it, they always say swimming is the best exercise because you work all the muscles in your body. I was on swim team in high school, had slight abs and definitions, best body in my life so far. Cut to later college years, I started swimming up to three times a day for 5 days in a row each week, with an hour each session, so sometimes total 4 hours a day swimming, and boy did my body respond well. I was tight and firm at one point!