Can You Forgive Dylann Roof, Who Massacred Churchgoers?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 25, 2015 1:45 AM GMT
    NYT: What people are really asking for when they demand forgiveness from a traumatized community is absolution.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/24/opinion/why-i-cant-forgive-dylann-roof.html?ref=opinion
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jun 25, 2015 1:59 AM GMT
    That was searing. I wish she'd throw God under the bus, though. She's almost there, but she's holding onto Catholicism, for some reason.

    I don't wish to see a race war, but I support black power in a time of gross white supremacy. How can we save the planet if we can't even see past skin color?
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jun 25, 2015 2:41 AM GMT
    I don't believe the survivors of the Boston Bombing have accepted tsarnaev's apology, which came today during his death sentence hearing.

    Not that one can expect Roof to ever apologize, anyway. He seems more sure of his racism than the younger tsarnaev brother seems about his jihad.
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Jun 25, 2015 4:32 AM GMT
    no, he should get the death penalty, but it costs too much to carry out

    7.3 billion people on the planet, who needs this pos around
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    Jun 25, 2015 1:58 PM GMT
    tj85016 saidno, he should get the death penalty, but it costs too much to carry out

    7.3 billion people on the planet, who needs this pos around

    It also costs a fortune to imprison a young man for life. Not until someone figures a way to make him pay his own way. Doing menial prison labor does not cover the costs of imprisonment.

    I'm also generally against the death penalty. Because it has historically been applied arbitrarily and racially in the US, and as we are increasingly learning, wrongly against innocent people. That is one mistake you cannot undo and take back once executed.

    But in the Boston and Charleston cases the guilt is certain. I can believe the younger Tsarnaev was radicalized by his older brother, but that is not a sufficient exculpating factor.

    And an example must be made for future terrorists. Furthermore, keeping him in prison will always present an objective for terrorists, to kidnap others and try to swap them for his release. Better he be dead and gone, the sooner the better.

    Likewise let lingering Confederate & racist causes die with Roof. It appears he's already done considerable damage to his precious Confederate flag, and that's good. Bury the 2 of them together.
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    Jun 25, 2015 2:18 PM GMT
    I'm generally opposed to the death penalty in most cases, but most of that opposition comes from my mistrust of the prosecutorial side (Project Innocence).

    My standard of proof in a death penalty case goes far beyond 'beyond a reasonable doubt' to as near zero doubt as is possible. In certain circumstances when there is zero doubt regarding who did it and concrete proof of premeditation, such as Boston and Charleston, let em fry.
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    Jun 25, 2015 2:21 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidI don't believe the survivors of the Boston Bombing have accepted tsarnaev's apology, which came today during his death sentence hearing.

    Not that one can expect Roof to ever apologize, anyway. He seems more sure of his racism than the younger tsarnaev brother seems about his jihad.


    Do YOU support the death penalty in those two cases, Charleston and Boston?
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Jun 25, 2015 2:35 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    tj85016 saidno, he should get the death penalty, but it costs too much to carry out

    7.3 billion people on the planet, who needs this pos around

    It also costs a fortune to imprison a young man for life. Not until someone figures a way to make him pay his own way. Doing menial prison labor does not cover the costs of imprisonment.

    I'm also generally against the death penalty. Because it has historically been applied arbitrarily and racially in the US, and as we are increasingly learning, wrongly against innocent people. That is one mistake you cannot undo and take back once executed.

    But in the Boston and Charleston cases the guilt is certain. I can believe the younger Tsarnaev was radicalized by his older brother, but that is not a sufficient exculpating factor.

    And an example must be made for future terrorists. Furthermore, keeping him in prison will always present an objective for terrorists, to kidnap others and try to swap them for his release. Better he be dead and gone, the sooner the better.

    Likewise let lingering Confederate & racist causes die with Roof. It appears he's already done considerable damage to his precious Confederate flag, and that's good. Bury the 2 of them together.


    It does not cost a fortune to imprison someone, all those costs you see include prison construction - all it costs is food and maybe some overtime
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jun 25, 2015 6:00 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    HottJoe saidI don't believe the survivors of the Boston Bombing have accepted tsarnaev's apology, which came today during his death sentence hearing.

    Not that one can expect Roof to ever apologize, anyway. He seems more sure of his racism than the younger tsarnaev brother seems about his jihad.


    Do YOU support the death penalty in those two cases, Charleston and Boston?

    No. I think it would be worse for those young men to have to live with what they've done, after their religion/race they killed for becomes obsolete and/or abandons them.

    I actually think they should be studied like lab rats/chimps. I want my skincare products and cookie preservatives to be tested on terrorists not bunny rabbits.icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 25, 2015 6:19 PM GMT
    tj85016 said
    Art_Deco said
    tj85016 saidno, he should get the death penalty, but it costs too much to carry out

    7.3 billion people on the planet, who needs this pos around

    It also costs a fortune to imprison a young man for life. Not until someone figures a way to make him pay his own way. Doing menial prison labor does not cover the costs of imprisonment.

    I'm also generally against the death penalty. Because it has historically been applied arbitrarily and racially in the US, and as we are increasingly learning, wrongly against innocent people. That is one mistake you cannot undo and take back once executed.

    But in the Boston and Charleston cases the guilt is certain. I can believe the younger Tsarnaev was radicalized by his older brother, but that is not a sufficient exculpating factor.

    And an example must be made for future terrorists. Furthermore, keeping him in prison will always present an objective for terrorists, to kidnap others and try to swap them for his release. Better he be dead and gone, the sooner the better.

    Likewise let lingering Confederate & racist causes die with Roof. It appears he's already done considerable damage to his precious Confederate flag, and that's good. Bury the 2 of them together.


    It does not cost a fortune to imprison someone, all those costs you see include prison construction - all it costs is food and maybe some overtime


    really?

    "A report by the organization, "The Price of Prisons," states that the cost of incarcerating one inmate in Fiscal 2010 was $31,307 per year. "In states like Connecticut, Washington state, New York, it's anywhere from $50,000 to $60,000," he said.

    Yes - $60,000 a year. That's a teacher's salary, or a firefighter's. Our epidemic of incarceration costs us taxpayers $63.4 billion a year. "

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-cost-of-a-nation-of-incarceration/

    Nationwide, the numbers are staggering: Nearly 2.4 million people behind bars, even though over the last 20 years the crime rate has actually dropped by more than 40 percent.

    "The United States has about 5 percent of the world's population, but we have 25 percent of the world's prisoners - we incarcerate a greater percentage of our population than any country on Earth,"

    Then of course there is the conflict of interest between private prisons and profit, incarcerating even more people.

    Banking on Bondage: Private Prisons and Mass Incarceration

    https://www.aclu.org/banking-bondage-private-prisons-and-mass-incarceration