Testosterone tests?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 28, 2009 6:37 AM GMT
    Has anyone gone through Testosterone testing? How much does it cost? Insurance covers it if you don't really require it?

    I have an inkling that my T-levels are low, cause I'm gaining fat around the hips and stomach the past year, which is pretty sick! I tried Tribulus, Kelp and indole-3-C, no avail.


    Any suggestions? icon_confused.gif
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    Jan 28, 2009 6:48 PM GMT
    Do you have any other symptoms besides fat gain, like low energy, loss of sex drive, loss of motivation, fatigue? If there are legitimate symptoms insurance will definitely cover the cost. Besides testosterone testing is fairly cheap anyway, usually under a 100 bucks for that test. But before I considered testosterone replacement therapy I would also have estrogen levels checked. There are some OTC supplements that do work to increase testosterone but before I would recommend them I would make sure that you have your testosterone, you LH, and your FSH all checked so you know if you have low testosterone whether it's caused by poor testicular function or poor pituitary function. Put simply, the hypothalamus releases gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gnrh) which causes the pituitary gland to release follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). Luteinizing hormone is the hormone primarily responsible for signaling testosterone production in the testicle. Once you know if there is a problem and where the problem is then you can consider something ATD or even HCG to boost testosterone levels without having to go on testosterone replacement therapy, or in the alternative if necessary that can be started to maintain a normal healthy testosterone level.

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    Jan 28, 2009 6:54 PM GMT
    I paid 25 bucks for my last one.

    If you have insurance, almost certainly, a CMP and a testosterone test, will be picked up for as little as the amount of your co-pay.

    Sooner is better. It's cheap, and can add years to your life, protect you from disease, while making you feel a bunch better.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jan 28, 2009 7:00 PM GMT
    1) Call your insurance company and ask if it is covered.
    2) Go to a qualified endocrinologist and have it done right.

    peace- and good luck!
  • gymguy81

    Posts: 455

    Jan 28, 2009 7:09 PM GMT
    realy did not know low test count can effect mood
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    Jan 28, 2009 7:50 PM GMT
    Note that one guy may consider 200 a "normal" test level, while another may consider 1200 a "normal" test level. It's very subjective. HIV studies have shown a test level above 1000 can make a remarkable difference. I know folks who have test as low as 40. I tested at 1100 when I was 32. I'm 48 now. I have several friends that have unadjusted levels of 350 to 500. By one doc's standards, anything over 200 may be o.k. By another's, they may like it better at 1000. I have several doctors I deal with that use it themselves. I have spent hours talking with other doctors with lots of praise. Some doctors are scared because of all the fluff surrounding AAS use. Bottom line: it works well.

    If you meet a doctor who won't work with you, get another. Lots of them are using it. Geriatric specialists, internal medicine, doctors in middle-age will probably be more receptive than others. Usually, someone at the gym will know a doctor that is in the know.

    Lots of folks around my age, and beyond, who grew up with all this, are demanding HRT, and we know from our own experiences the amazing benefits, and we've taken time to study all the science. AAS were not controlled until 1991. We're running around without taking a cabinet full of meds and have great blood work, which completely throws all the hype out the window. The truth is in the numbers.

    Because you're 24, it's hard to tell where your numbers are. I know folks in their late 20's on HRT. I know folks who have low numbers who are on HRT and are even younger. Many doctors, in the current legal environment, might be reluctant to work with you for another couple of years. By far, the highest risk from HRT would be legal, but, if your levels are low enough, a good doc will write you a script no problem.
  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    Jan 28, 2009 8:05 PM GMT
    You need to test for both total and free testosterone. Before hrt my total t was less than 200. Now it's over 800. I give myself an injection once per week. I tried androgel, applied to the skin, but did not absorb it well enough. I want to get my t level higher because even at this level my sex drive has not returned. My insurance cover the test, and my doc tests for t total and free, hematocrit, liver function, psa, and estrogen level.
  • UFJocknerd

    Posts: 392

    Jan 28, 2009 8:14 PM GMT
    Sparkycat saidYou need to test for both total and free testosterone. Before hrt my total t was less than 200. Now it's over 800. I give myself an injection once per week. I tried androgel, applied to the skin, but did not absorb it well enough. I want to get my t level higher because even at this level my sex drive has not returned. My insurance cover the test, and my doc tests for t total and free, hematocrit, liver function, psa, and estrogen level.


    Your doctor gives you vials and has you inject yourself? I thought US docs didn't (a) give out test vials or (b) regularly let patients other than diabetics stick themselves with anything. Please let me know if I've been misinformed on that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 28, 2009 8:27 PM GMT
    Not sure what the next step should be.

    I checked my insurance website (premera blue shield ppo) and found that I am eligible for most tests, but don't know who to turn to.

    Should I find an endocrinologist? a lab? a family doctor?

    I don't have an allopath doctor, just a naturopath that I go to, and he's not covered, but he also doesn't specialize in hormone stuff, he told me to take more tribulus.

    Any advice here.

    Thank you all who post, this all has been vital information.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 28, 2009 11:43 PM GMT
    ANDRE_3000 saidNot sure what the next step should be.

    I checked my insurance website (premera blue shield ppo) and found that I am eligible for most tests, but don't know who to turn to.

    Should I find an endocrinologist? a lab? a family doctor?

    I don't have an allopath doctor, just a naturopath that I go to, and he's not covered, but he also doesn't specialize in hormone stuff, he told me to take more tribulus.

    Any advice here.

    Thank you all who post, this all has been vital information.





    Andre, I am on the same boat as you, and I am getting extensive blood tests done next wk to see if I am eligable for T therapy/hgh therapy, I have all of the symtoms mentioned earlier...I actually contacted PysiciansRejuvenation.com, wich was advertised on this websight...I am excited and aprehensive, but hope for posotive results...so check out the websight for more info.....goodluck!icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 31, 2009 4:13 AM GMT
    I know several folks who have INJECTABLE testosterone prescriptions.
  • reload16

    Posts: 267

    Jan 31, 2009 5:09 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidNote that one guy may consider 200 a "normal" test level, while another may consider 1200 a "normal" test level. It's very subjective. HIV studies have shown a test level above 1000 can make a remarkable difference. I know folks who have test as low as 40. I tested at 1100 when I was 32. I'm 48 now. I have several friends that have unadjusted levels of 350 to 500. By one doc's standards, anything over 200 may be o.k. By another's, they may like it better at 1000. I have several doctors I deal with that use it themselves. I have spent hours talking with other doctors with lots of praise. Some doctors are scared because of all the fluff surrounding AAS use. Bottom line: it works well.

    If you meet a doctor who won't work with you, get another. Lots of them are using it. Geriatric specialists, internal medicine, doctors in middle-age will probably be more receptive than others. Usually, someone at the gym will know a doctor that is in the know.

    Lots of folks around my age, and beyond, who grew up with all this, are demanding HRT, and we know from our own experiences the amazing benefits, and we've taken time to study all the science. AAS were not controlled until 1991. We're running around without taking a cabinet full of meds and have great blood work, which completely throws all the hype out the window. The truth is in the numbers.

    Because you're 24, it's hard to tell where your numbers are. I know folks in their late 20's on HRT. I know folks who have low numbers who are on HRT and are even younger. Many doctors, in the current legal environment, might be reluctant to work with you for another couple of years. By far, the highest risk from HRT would be legal, but, if your levels are low enough, a good doc will write you a script no problem.


    So what levels are good in your opinion since the doctors don't agree on an exact number? or does it depend on individual? What if you don't know what is normal for you?

    I also have been experiencing gaining fat around stomach like OP along with being fatigue, sleep diorders, and low libido. And I am only 28.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 01, 2009 9:32 PM GMT
    28 is about the time when andropause starts. Some doctors think a level of 200 is o.k. Others, 500. Some take no issue with adjusting it up to 1200. There have been some studies of folks sick with HIV that show levels over 1000 can show a 40% increase in lean muscle mass from their prior wasting condition. Just about anyone you talk with says 1000 is a magic number.

    Here's a RJ member who is 61, and clearly a benefactor of HRT. It's, in my view, much better to prevent disease, than treat it.

    196539_380349.jpg

    http://www.realjock.com/profile/?id=196539

    You're far better off to take the natural hormone testosterone, than any snake oil that anyone is peddling.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2009 7:21 AM GMT
    chuckystud said28 is about the time when andropause starts. Some doctors think a level of 200 is o.k. Others, 500. Some take no issue with adjusting it up to 1200. There have been some studies of folks sick with HIV that show levels over 1000 can show a 40% increase in lean muscle mass from their prior wasting condition. Just about anyone you talk with says 1000 is a magic number.

    Here's a RJ member who is 61, and clearly a benefactor of HRT. It's, in my view, much better to prevent disease, than treat it.

    196539_380349.jpg

    http://www.realjock.com/profile/?id=196539

    You're far better off to take the natural hormone testosterone, than any snake oil that anyone is peddling.



    WOW....that guy is older than my dad.....I wonder what his T level is..icon_rolleyes.gif