Follow up(?) interview tomorrow, feeling extremely nervous.

  • ykkim

    Posts: 6

    Jun 30, 2015 3:28 AM GMT
    Hi guys.

    Just thought it would be beneficial if I could get some advice from some experienced rj members.

    Here I go, I'll try to make it short.

    I had an interview with a major sportswear company probably around two months ago. I was flown out to their company HQ for an in person interview which I thought it ended in utter disaster. At some point post-interview it got pretty silent. I did not hear back from them other than "you are still being considered for the role, we need to get through another round of candidates, etc." Fast forward about a month later and one of their senior recruiters reach out to me via phone. They basically told me that I was way overqualified for the position I was interviewing for but they wanted to "find" a position for me within the company that will enable me to efficiently utilize my skill sets. I was told the responsibilities I am taking on now is equal to the tasks that a senior level would be held accountable for.

    Here is where the confusing part kicks in. They asked for more. That was it. They did not specify if they wanted to see more of my personal work (I work in the design field), or if they wanted to know more about my responsibilities I am currently partaking at my current job. They did not ask to see my portfolio, as I have already received great feedback regarding that. If I had more personal work to show, I definitely would but I have devoted all my energy into my current job that I literally have no time to work on my own thing.

    Is this perhaps a chance for me to really get in-depth and talk about my extensive duties at my current job? Team management, Design, Product Development, Production, things in this nature? I just want to stroll in to this interview properly prepared, because I don't want to walk in with one thing while the other person is expecting something completely different. I'd be a fool to let that happen.

    If this was an interview at any other place, I wouldn't be as nervous. But this place is probably one of my top 5 dream jobs and I want to absolutely nail it tomorrow.

    So I guess what I am asking you guys is, what would you do if you found yourself in a similar situation?

    I apologize for the rant, but I could really use some wisdom here!!
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3525

    Jun 30, 2015 3:36 AM GMT
    You shouldnt be nervous at an interview, it is unbecoming. If you are professional, you know your job, nothing else matters. Do some due dilligence about the company, know their work and their competition. Have your work samples available on something portable, and know the standard questions. Everything else is just confidence.
  • WrestlerBoy

    Posts: 1903

    Jun 30, 2015 11:36 AM GMT
    I am going to give you a piece of advice (which is not my style) which sounds so simple, and so stupid, it's ridiculous.

    My father has hired more than 500 lawyers over the last 40 years. I now use the same "system". If, at some point, an applicant does not use the words, "I WANT this job, and I can DO this job", they're not getting hired.

    Make sure you use those exact words; and see what happens icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 30, 2015 1:46 PM GMT
    Consider this interview a brand new interview. Sure there will probably be some familiar faces but 2 months is a long time for them to remember every detail of your previous discussion. If you had to provide a portfolio or any samples, expect to potentially walk them through those again as a refresher.

    (I've worked in HR for 18 years.)
    Being called back in is pretty common if you were overqualified for a previous role and they really liked you. Use this discussion as an opportunity to show all that you can do. Propose some ideas, ask questions as if it were your first day on the job (how do you measure performance, what would I be expected to accomplish in the first 90 days, who are are best partners/challenges? etc. If you have ideas about strategy, this would be a good time to say "have you thought about this approach?"/

    Also, be prepared to talk about what you would want to do on a day-to-day basis. Don't try to be the candidate that they want. Be the the job you want, because if you do the job you want, you'll enjoy it and do it well. Some jobs would not be a good fit for you so don't flex too much unless you're prepared to flex for the duration of the role.

    Lastly, you need to assure them that you are will to do what it takes to be successful for the role. "Overqualified" is often code for "the candidate may think the job is beneath them and therefore will be looking for another role after they start or might feel they are too good to perform the duties". So counter with your work ethic, dedication, AND that you are committed to the long term strategy. (Just do this after you ask what that strategy is).

    Good luck!
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jun 30, 2015 7:48 PM GMT
    ykkim saidHi guys.

    Just thought it would be beneficial if I could get some advice from some experienced rj members.

    Here I go, I'll try to make it short.

    I had an interview with a major sportswear company probably around two months ago. I was flown out to their company HQ for an in person interview which I thought it ended in utter disaster. At some point post-interview it got pretty silent. I did not hear back from them other than "you are still being considered for the role, we need to get through another round of candidates, etc." Fast forward about a month later and one of their senior recruiters reach out to me via phone. They basically told me that I was way overqualified for the position I was interviewing for but they wanted to "find" a position for me within the company that will enable me to efficiently utilize my skill sets. I was told the responsibilities I am taking on now is equal to the tasks that a senior level would be held accountable for.

    Here is where the confusing part kicks in. They asked for more. That was it. They did not specify if they wanted to see more of my personal work (I work in the design field), or if they wanted to know more about my responsibilities I am currently partaking at my current job. They did not ask to see my portfolio, as I have already received great feedback regarding that. If I had more personal work to show, I definitely would but I have devoted all my energy into my current job that I literally have no time to work on my own thing.

    Is this perhaps a chance for me to really get in-depth and talk about my extensive duties at my current job? Team management, Design, Product Development, Production, things in this nature? I just want to stroll in to this interview properly prepared, because I don't want to walk in with one thing while the other person is expecting something completely different. I'd be a fool to let that happen.

    If this was an interview at any other place, I wouldn't be as nervous. But this place is probably one of my top 5 dream jobs and I want to absolutely nail it tomorrow.

    So I guess what I am asking you guys is, what would you do if you found yourself in a similar situation?

    I apologize for the rant, but I could really use some wisdom here!!


    Of course you're nervous. Who wouldn't be under the circumstances? But they don't have to know that you're nervous.

    I assume that you have studied the company thoroughly, that you are well prepared, and have a reasonable idea of what to expect. The fact that they are calling you in for another interview indicates that they see you as qualified. Also, the fact that they are calling you again even though you felt uneasy in your previous interview shows that you performed better than you realized. You must have done something right. So, even though you are somewhat nervous, you do have good reason to be confident.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 30, 2015 8:49 PM GMT
    Apparition saidYou shouldnt be nervous at an interview, it is unbecoming. If you are professional, you know your job, nothing else matters.


    I disagree. A person may know they are qualified for a job and have confidence in their skills, but standing before a hiring panel and having to sell yourself is going to induce some nerves/anxiety. A person may be expected to contain themselves appropriately, but saying they shouldn't be nervous because it is unbecoming is unreasonable. It is human nature to be nervous/anxious when we feel we are being judged/tested.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 30, 2015 11:30 PM GMT
    In one interview a few years ago, I was doing pretty well until the director asked me a question that I did not know the answer to. So, I responded: "I don`t know, but given that it`s important to the corporation/business, I would find out". She then proceeded to ask me "how?", to which I responded, "I would research, ask questions and most importantly find out from management". I got the job and she told me afterwards that she admired my honesty given that I really had no clue how to respond...
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3525

    Jun 30, 2015 11:55 PM GMT
    IsigVinter said
    Apparition saidYou shouldnt be nervous at an interview, it is unbecoming. If you are professional, you know your job, nothing else matters.


    I disagree. A person may know they are qualified for a job and have confidence in their skills, but standing before a hiring panel and having to sell yourself is going to induce some nerves/anxiety. A person may be expected to contain themselves appropriately, but saying they shouldn't be nervous because it is unbecoming is unreasonable. It is human nature to be nervous/anxious when we feel we are being judged/tested.



    it should induce happiness and excitement, not fear and nervousness
































  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    Jul 01, 2015 12:07 AM GMT
    I remember like 5 years ago I was interviewing for this one job and the interviewer asked me a completely off-topic questions that caught me way off guard. He goes "if u could be any mountain in the world, what one would u be and why?"


    I fucking choked because under the pressure of the interview and being caught so off guard I couldnt think of a single fucking mountain!!!! Even though, I know quite a few, I drew a complete black, it was awful! I could only think of mountain ranges and not an individual mountain.... so I said something to the effect of "Thats quite an interesting question- i'd have to give it a bit more thought".... after like 5 secs of silence. For the life of me, I couldn't think of a mountain I wanted to be... let alon explain why I wanted to be that mountain.

    That asshole icon_mad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 01, 2015 12:23 AM GMT
    Apparition said
    IsigVinter said
    Apparition saidYou shouldnt be nervous at an interview, it is unbecoming. If you are professional, you know your job, nothing else matters.


    I disagree. A person may know they are qualified for a job and have confidence in their skills, but standing before a hiring panel and having to sell yourself is going to induce some nerves/anxiety. A person may be expected to contain themselves appropriately, but saying they shouldn't be nervous because it is unbecoming is unreasonable. It is human nature to be nervous/anxious when we feel we are being judged/tested.



    it should induce happiness and excitement, not fear and nervousness



    The OP did not state he was fearful. Of course he is experiencing happiness and excitement; it is one of his top 5 dream jobs. Understandably, he is nervous. Why do you think that is unnatural?
  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    Jul 01, 2015 12:27 AM GMT
    I agree that's it's normal and OK to be nervous before a big interview. We ALL get nervous before a big interview for a job we're totally gunning for.

    The important thing is to remember to not let the nervousness show while interviewing. No shakey voices, try not to have sweaty palm handshakes, etc... You need to "project" confidence, whether u feel confident or not. You need to at the very least, act like u know what you're talking about.

    Sending positive vibes ur way, keep us posted and let us know how it goes.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 01, 2015 1:49 AM GMT
    WrestlerBoy saidI am going to give you a piece of advice (which is not my style) which sounds so simple, and so stupid, it's ridiculous.

    My father has hired more than 500 lawyers over the last 40 years. I now use the same "system". If, at some point, an applicant does not use the words, "I WANT this job, and I can DO this job", they're not getting hired.

    Make sure you use those exact words; and see what happens icon_biggrin.gif


    Like:
    Interesting advice.
  • ykkim

    Posts: 6

    Jul 01, 2015 2:27 AM GMT
    Thanks for all this great advice.

    I am happy to say that this interview ended on a positive note! I was surprised about the first thing this recruiter had told me as soon as I walked in. I was told that it wasn't often that they get a candidate where their work really speaks for itself. I was relieved when I heard that, which meant I was lucky enough to give a lasting impression on someone during that unfortunate first interview. Luckily there were no sweaty palms or moments of word vomit this time around.

    The questions weren't too difficult to answer and it ended by them asking me to submit a final portfolio for review. The recruiter gave me great feedback saying that I had great potential and she would do whatever she could to get me in there.

    I should hear back in a week or so.. definitely keeping my fingers crossed for this one.

    icon_smile.gif
  • ykkim

    Posts: 6

    Jul 01, 2015 2:41 AM GMT
    Import saidI agree that's it's normal and OK to be nervous before a big interview. We ALL get nervous before a big interview for a job we're totally gunning for.

    The important thing is to remember to not let the nervousness show while interviewing. No shakey voices, try not to have sweaty palm handshakes, etc... You need to "project" confidence, whether u feel confident or not. You need to at the very least, act like u know what you're talking about.

    Sending positive vibes ur way, keep us posted and let us know how it goes.


    It's funny I was thinking this exact same thing just before I went in for the interview.

    I pretty much told myself it's okay to be nervous, just go in there with a clear mind and get straight to the point. Now looking back, I now understand why I fucked up the first time around. Rather than letting it just naturally happen, I tried to cram in and plan every word that I was going to say. My mind went blank and my confidence quickly diminished right after but fortunately this time around that didn't happen.

    icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 01, 2015 3:04 AM GMT
    There's such a thing as to Overthink it. Just be yourself, be normal, cool calm and collective. Be honest as possible. I mean, questions that the HR people ask, it seems to be repetitive anyway. Just emphasize your skills and qualifications for the job and say that I believe I can be successful to the job and an asset to the company. The one thing I noticed that I probably did wrong in the past was that I appeared nervous or too needy or whatever. The company and the HR need to sell you why you need to work there too. SO ask them questions, fire back, back and forth like a tennis match. Don't just sit there and get grilled.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 01, 2015 3:18 AM GMT
    due your diligence. If they haven't defined the 'more' then give them more of everything you mentioned. No one ever missed a major career leap by doing less… good luck! icon_biggrin.gif