Vegan Diet Can Lead to Weight Loss

  • Orland23

    Posts: 325

    Jul 02, 2015 4:49 AM GMT
    Vegan diets without animal products helps increase weight loss since meat has higher amounts of fat and calories then plant-based matter.

    http://www.rawstory.com/2015/07/going-vegan-can-lead-to-weight-loss-study/

    In college, I know a couple of vegetarians and a vegan. My vegetarian friend is only 120 pounds and is about 5'7". In Climate Change class, there was a student who is a vegan, and since he cut out meat, he says that he has more energy and feels less sluggish, he is also slender.

    I am not a vegetarian nor a vegan but some days I go meatless. One aspects of a vegan diet is that it is generally more difficult to put on muscle mass since for muscle building, more protein is needed, but many people actually intake too much protein.

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    Jul 02, 2015 6:18 AM GMT
    Orland23 saidVegan diets without animal products helps increase weight loss since meat has higher amounts of fat and calories then plant-based matter.

    http://www.rawstory.com/2015/07/going-vegan-can-lead-to-weight-loss-study/

    In college, I know a couple of vegetarians and a vegan. My vegetarian friend is only 120 pounds and is about 5'7". In Climate Change class, there was a student who is a vegan, and since he cut out meat, he says that he has more energy and feels less sluggish, he is also slender.

    I am not a vegetarian nor a vegan but some days I go meatless. One aspects of a vegan diet is that it is generally more difficult to put on muscle mass since for muscle building, more protein is needed, but many people actually intake too much protein.



    The only thing that increases weight loss is eating in a caloric deficit. Eat whatever you want, as long as ur in a deficit your still gonna loose weight. Doesn't matter if you eat plants or steak and ice cream. And the average person actually doesn't consume enough protein. If you are looking to build muscle you would need to eat around .8-1g of protein per lb of lean bodyweight. Since you don't know how much of it your body is actually synthesizing I would shoot a little higher around 1.2g. When dieting it should be even higher closer to 1.5g. When I set my parents macros up for their diet and they recorded everything in myfitness pal they both were only getting maybe 60-80g of protein a day.
  • metta

    Posts: 39089

    Jul 02, 2015 6:59 AM GMT
    Yes, I think that it is easier to lose weight and/or maintain weight loss on a HEALTHY vegetarian/vegan diet. There are many reasons and factors involved. I think that one of the reasons why is that vegetarians/vegans do not eat foods full of growth hormones and chemicals to make livestock grow faster.
  • EricPrado

    Posts: 206

    Jul 02, 2015 11:38 AM GMT
    Is this about being slim or being healthy? Because you could be thin, but you could have a variety of illnesses at the same time.


    Being vegan or vegetarian wouldn't work for me as anything that is a grain gives me problems and that is the foundation of their diet. What worked for me is going paleo, which is like the total opposite of a vegetarian diet. I eat real foods so that means a lot of fruits, some veggies, nuts, and yea, tons of meat. I omit processed foods and get all my nutrition through food (no protein powders, muscle milk, etc) and I feel great!

    I tried the whole vegetarian thing but ended up losing muscle mass and felt tired and foggy all the time. I think it just comes down to what works for you as everyone is different. I have a friend who is strictly vegan and now her dog is vegan as well.

    I'm not sure how I feel about that since dogs are carnivores by nature, just look at wolves.

    But anyway. Are you trying to lose weight?
  • EricPrado

    Posts: 206

    Jul 02, 2015 11:42 AM GMT
    metta8 saidYes, I think that it is easier to lose weight and/or maintain weight loss on a HEALTHY vegetarian/vegan diet. There are many reasons and factors involved. I think that one of the reasons why is that vegetarians/vegans do not eat foods full of growth hormones and chemicals to make livestock grow faster.



    Yeah, the growth hormones and all the antibiotics used in meat is a real problem. I do believe humans are meant to eat meat though, it's just it's become a market now where all the meat available is chocked full of bad junk.
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    Jul 02, 2015 1:20 PM GMT
    MrAesthetic said... The only thing that increases weight loss is eating in a caloric deficit. Eat whatever you want... they recorded everything in myfitness pal they both were only getting maybe 60-80g of protein a day.


    vegan or not dosnt matter. Just saying a complete change of diet is helpful if you plan to loose a significant amount of weight. Get a life of bad habits in ckeck with one big reset.

    There exists the technology to get sufficient protein with vegan foods.

    I think MyFitness Pal would work well for people just going vegan.
  • metta

    Posts: 39089

    Jul 02, 2015 1:22 PM GMT
    EricPrado saidI do believe humans are meant to eat meat though



    Humans don't have to eat meat. I have not had any for 25 years and I don't have any health issues or feel 'foggy'.
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    Jul 02, 2015 3:06 PM GMT
    The vegan lifestyle has always been fascinating to me. Though I'm sure it would be hard cutting out all dairy products. It'd be hard to gain muscle and meet the proper protein intake for muscle growth. Though it is possible. I just haven't put forth the time and research into it. Always an interesting life change though. I've thought about it before.
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    Jul 02, 2015 3:32 PM GMT
    metta8 saidYes, I think that it is easier to lose weight and/or maintain weight loss on a HEALTHY vegetarian/vegan diet.

    ^
    This. I know a few unhealthy vegans who order in greasy oily meat-free takeout with a milkshake all the time.
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    Jul 02, 2015 3:53 PM GMT
    Ovo-lacto vegetarian here for more than 20 years. I can assure you I've no problem "maintaining weight". Bread and chocolate are the enemy but I love them so.

    I could counter that by going vegan, I suppose. Not that I'd have to stop eating bread, but that vegan "cheese" makes me vomit and I presume that would come with weight loss.

    I love being vegetarian but I doubt I'd ever go vegan. Cheese would be my downfall there, love the stuff. And now I'm feel better about eating it because a lot more is made these days with non-animal enzymes instead of rennet which always grossed me out. I only buy non-rennet cheese now that so many options are available.

    The aspect of being non-vegan that bothers me is that even though by not eating meats I've reduced my footprint with regard to causing suffering, I also know that the commercial industry of producing any animal products can't be completely good.

    So while I'm glad that I don't kill cows to eat, I'm not happy that the industry might kill male cows in dairy farming. I suppose if they were shipped to the meat eaters or used for dog food then I'd only feel half guilty. But I'd seen a documentary where they were disposed of in mass graves which I found super disturbing. I don't know what current procedures are.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Jul 02, 2015 4:47 PM GMT
    MrAesthetic said
    Orland23 saidVegan diets without animal products helps increase weight loss since meat has higher amounts of fat and calories then plant-based matter.

    http://www.rawstory.com/2015/07/going-vegan-can-lead-to-weight-loss-study/

    In college, I know a couple of vegetarians and a vegan. My vegetarian friend is only 120 pounds and is about 5'7". In Climate Change class, there was a student who is a vegan, and since he cut out meat, he says that he has more energy and feels less sluggish, he is also slender.

    I am not a vegetarian nor a vegan but some days I go meatless. One aspects of a vegan diet is that it is generally more difficult to put on muscle mass since for muscle building, more protein is needed, but many people actually intake too much protein.



    The only thing that increases weight loss is eating in a caloric deficit. Eat whatever you want, as long as ur in a deficit your still gonna loose weight. Doesn't matter if you eat plants or steak and ice cream. And the average person actually doesn't consume enough protein. If you are looking to build muscle you would need to eat around .8-1g of protein per lb of lean bodyweight. Since you don't know how much of it your body is actually synthesizing I would shoot a little higher around 1.2g. When dieting it should be even higher closer to 1.5g. When I set my parents macros up for their diet and they recorded everything in myfitness pal they both were only getting maybe 60-80g of protein a day.


    There are other opinions.

    According to some authorities, the typical American diet contains considerably more protein than necessary. If I correctly recall, the currently recommended daily intake of protein is about 60 grams for a 150 pound man. An intake of 0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight would be 120 grams for a 150 pound man which is already twice the recommended amount. Thus it would appear that most people would not benefit from ingesting even more protein since they are already getting more protein than necessary for muscle building.

    In doing a google search on "excessive protein" one can find a number of different opinions. Some very credible sources assert that excessive protein can cause health problems. Even more assert that there is nothing to be gained by greatly increasing protein intake beyond what people typically get.
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    Jul 02, 2015 6:36 PM GMT
    I lost weight when I went vegetarian but still drank milk and ate dairy products. Then I went vegan. The weight loss was slow but steady and consistent, I think it was about a pound every 2 weeks.

    I never felt any different, neither more nor less healthy, same with energy. But I wasn't running or working out then.

    I also made a point of reducing my fat as much as possible and also stopped eating candy, pastries, and anything with added sugar.

    It's quite possible that the weight loss was due to my eating fewer calories; and let's face it, vegan low fat food is more boring than regular food so I could have been consuming fewer calories. Cutting the fats and sugars no doubt helped lower the calorie count as well.
  • Silverlakr

    Posts: 31

    Jul 03, 2015 1:04 AM GMT
    I was vegetarian for 34 years and then I transitioned to a vegan diet for the last 3 years. It's all good. Regarding weight loss, I agree, it's all about calories taken in and calories burned, it's that simple...icon_smile.gif
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    Jul 03, 2015 2:22 AM GMT
    FRE0 said
    MrAesthetic said
    Orland23 saidVegan diets without animal products helps increase weight loss since meat has higher amounts of fat and calories then plant-based matter.

    http://www.rawstory.com/2015/07/going-vegan-can-lead-to-weight-loss-study/

    In college, I know a couple of vegetarians and a vegan. My vegetarian friend is only 120 pounds and is about 5'7". In Climate Change class, there was a student who is a vegan, and since he cut out meat, he says that he has more energy and feels less sluggish, he is also slender.

    I am not a vegetarian nor a vegan but some days I go meatless. One aspects of a vegan diet is that it is generally more difficult to put on muscle mass since for muscle building, more protein is needed, but many people actually intake too much protein.



    The only thing that increases weight loss is eating in a caloric deficit. Eat whatever you want, as long as ur in a deficit your still gonna loose weight. Doesn't matter if you eat plants or steak and ice cream. And the average person actually doesn't consume enough protein. If you are looking to build muscle you would need to eat around .8-1g of protein per lb of lean bodyweight. Since you don't know how much of it your body is actually synthesizing I would shoot a little higher around 1.2g. When dieting it should be even higher closer to 1.5g. When I set my parents macros up for their diet and they recorded everything in myfitness pal they both were only getting maybe 60-80g of protein a day.


    There are other opinions.

    According to some authorities, the typical American diet contains considerably more protein than necessary. If I correctly recall, the currently recommended daily intake of protein is about 60 grams for a 150 pound man. An intake of 0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight would be 120 grams for a 150 pound man which is already twice the recommended amount. Thus it would appear that most people would not benefit from ingesting even more protein since they are already getting more protein than necessary for muscle building.

    In doing a google search on "excessive protein" one can find a number of different opinions. Some very credible sources assert that excessive protein can cause health problems. Even more assert that there is nothing to be gained by greatly increasing protein intake beyond what people typically get.


    I wasn't necessarily talking about what is recommended to be healthy. I was talking about making a muscular gain. If you think 60g of protein would be sufficient enough to build muscle, good luck with your skinny fat goals of 2015.
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    Jul 03, 2015 8:03 AM GMT
    Orland23 saidVegan diets without animal products helps increase weight loss since meat has higher amounts of fat and calories then plant-based matter.


    Wrong, illogical, nonsensical, misleading, simplistic, stupid.

    With all due respect.
  • Parker817

    Posts: 359

    Jul 03, 2015 11:43 AM GMT
    theantijock saidOvo-lacto vegetarian here for more than 20 years. I can assure you I've no problem "maintaining weight". Bread and chocolate are the enemy but I love them so.

    ...

    The aspect of being non-vegan that bothers me is that even though by not eating meats I've reduced my footprint with regard to causing suffering, I also know that the commercial industry of producing any animal products can't be completely good.

    ...



    I've been doing the ovo-octo thing now for a few months, and I look and feel great. And I agree with the carbon footprint thing -- I buy most of my veggies fresh and unbagged, eggs in cardboard, and make my own paneer cheese that's great with anything.
  • metta

    Posts: 39089

    Jul 03, 2015 4:04 PM GMT
    eagermuscle said
    metta8 saidYes, I think that it is easier to lose weight and/or maintain weight loss on a HEALTHY vegetarian/vegan diet.

    ^
    This. I know a few unhealthy vegans who order in greasy oily meat-free takeout with a milkshake all the time.


    Which is why I emphasized 'Healthy' icon_smile.gif
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    Jul 03, 2015 4:06 PM GMT
    Parker817 said
    theantijock saidOvo-lacto vegetarian here for more than 20 years. I can assure you I've no problem "maintaining weight". Bread and chocolate are the enemy but I love them so.

    ...

    The aspect of being non-vegan that bothers me is that even though by not eating meats I've reduced my footprint with regard to causing suffering, I also know that the commercial industry of producing any animal products can't be completely good....


    I've been doing the ovo-octo thing now for a few months, and I look and feel great. And I agree with the carbon footprint thing -- I buy most of my veggies fresh and unbagged, eggs in cardboard, and make my own paneer cheese that's great with anything.


    Making your own paneer cheese sounds excellent. I thought about doing that once but then forgot about it. Thanx for the reminder.

    I eat a lot of tofu now that I've figured out how to use it and recently found good quality at an Asian market for a third the price that the supermarket charges. Wouldn't be worth making it if I could. I was stunned to learn the markup of my usual store.

    As to footprint, I do try to reduce my carbon footprint too, especially with my style of gardening as I'm into planting urban jungles, but really I don't so much look at it in terms of carbon but in terms of reducing suffering in the world. I recognize that my own living has a negative impact in my traveling around town on asphalt beneath my car, my residing in a house that takes up land, etc, and so I make efforts to counter that. I plant to create habit for wildlife while reducing carbon dioxide and increasing oxygen supply, I watch what food choices I make, etc., so that I try to minimalize not so much my carbon footprint specifically but that as a part of the footprint of suffering in the world that merely living might cause.
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    Jul 03, 2015 8:34 PM GMT
    Orland23 saidVegan diets without animal products helps increase weight loss ...


    Much the same as starvation helps increase weight loss.

  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Jul 03, 2015 9:33 PM GMT
    eagermuscle said
    metta8 saidYes, I think that it is easier to lose weight and/or maintain weight loss on a HEALTHY vegetarian/vegan diet.

    ^
    This. I know a few unhealthy vegans who order in greasy oily meat-free takeout with a milkshake all the time.

    Unhealthy vegans who eat milkshakes aren't really vegans, since they eat dairy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 03, 2015 9:46 PM GMT
    ======>Vegans, in addition to being vegetarian, do not use other animal products and by-products such as eggs, dairy products, honey, leather, fur, silk, wool, cosmetics, and soaps derived from animal products.

    Sorry, I like my Italian leather sofa, honey along with my farm fresh goat milk soap and the occasional home raised eggs. I also like the paleo diet with lots of fresh vegetables and selected fruits. I eat fresh, organic and very #NUTRITIOUS FOOD!



    https://www.vrg.org/nutshell/vegan.htm#what


    What Is The Paleo Diet?
    Assortment of paleo foodThe Paleo diet is the healthiest way you can eat because it is the ONLY nutritional approach that works with your genetics to help you stay lean, strong and energetic! Research in biology, biochemistry, Ophthalmology, Dermatology and many other disciplines indicate it is our modern diet, full of refined foods, trans fats and sugar, that is at the root of degenerative diseases such as obesity, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, depression and infertility. – Robb Wolf

    http://robbwolf.com/what-is-the-paleo-diet/

    I am healthy with a low body fat index
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Jul 04, 2015 6:47 PM GMT
    MrAesthetic said
    FRE0 said
    MrAesthetic said
    Orland23 saidVegan diets without animal products helps increase weight loss since meat has higher amounts of fat and calories then plant-based matter.

    http://www.rawstory.com/2015/07/going-vegan-can-lead-to-weight-loss-study/

    In college, I know a couple of vegetarians and a vegan. My vegetarian friend is only 120 pounds and is about 5'7". In Climate Change class, there was a student who is a vegan, and since he cut out meat, he says that he has more energy and feels less sluggish, he is also slender.

    I am not a vegetarian nor a vegan but some days I go meatless. One aspects of a vegan diet is that it is generally more difficult to put on muscle mass since for muscle building, more protein is needed, but many people actually intake too much protein.



    The only thing that increases weight loss is eating in a caloric deficit. Eat whatever you want, as long as ur in a deficit your still gonna loose weight. Doesn't matter if you eat plants or steak and ice cream. And the average person actually doesn't consume enough protein. If you are looking to build muscle you would need to eat around .8-1g of protein per lb of lean bodyweight. Since you don't know how much of it your body is actually synthesizing I would shoot a little higher around 1.2g. When dieting it should be even higher closer to 1.5g. When I set my parents macros up for their diet and they recorded everything in myfitness pal they both were only getting maybe 60-80g of protein a day.


    There are other opinions.

    According to some authorities, the typical American diet contains considerably more protein than necessary. If I correctly recall, the currently recommended daily intake of protein is about 60 grams for a 150 pound man. An intake of 0.8 grams per pound of bodyweight would be 120 grams for a 150 pound man which is already twice the recommended amount. Thus it would appear that most people would not benefit from ingesting even more protein since they are already getting more protein than necessary for muscle building.

    In doing a google search on "excessive protein" one can find a number of different opinions. Some very credible sources assert that excessive protein can cause health problems. Even more assert that there is nothing to be gained by greatly increasing protein intake beyond what people typically get.


    I wasn't necessarily talking about what is recommended to be healthy. I was talking about making a muscular gain. If you think 60g of protein would be sufficient enough to build muscle, good luck with your skinny fat goals of 2015.


    As long as one is ingesting somewhat more protein than is necessary to maintain good health, building muscle is possible. However, temporarily ingesting additional protein could increase the rate at which muscle is build. But doubling the amount of protein would be far more than necessary to achieve optimal results.