International Swimming Hall Of Fame

  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1272

    Jul 09, 2015 12:19 PM GMT
    Does anyone in the south Florida area know what the status of the ISHOF is? I read last year it was supposed to move to southern California, but then just read something about the original facility in Ft. Lauderdale possibly being remodeled. I swam there a few years ago, the pools were great, but it was in definite need of a facelift.
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    Jul 09, 2015 3:23 PM GMT
    Here you go. Swimmers Guide Online is THE resource for lap swimmers worldwide:

    http://www.swimmersguide.com/ViewFacility.aspx?fid=381

    I've swam at ISHOF, too, and it IS a great pool. Nothing beats swimming LC for an hour in the cool water under a hot FL sun!
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1272

    Jul 10, 2015 3:05 AM GMT
    MGINSD saidHere you go. Swimmers Guide Online is THE resource for lap swimmers worldwide:

    http://www.swimmersguide.com/ViewFacility.aspx?fid=381

    I've swam at ISHOF, too, and it IS a great pool. Nothing beats swimming LC for an hour in the cool water under a hot FL sun!


    Thanks! When I swam there, it was in pool #2 I think. It was 25 yards, but I remember it having like 20 lanes. The shallowest part was 9ft and the deepest part was 17ft. Considering the history of the ISHOF in Ft. Lauderdale, it's inexcusable for the city to not have maintained that facility.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14310

    Jul 10, 2015 12:46 PM GMT
    ChicagoSteve said
    MGINSD saidHere you go. Swimmers Guide Online is THE resource for lap swimmers worldwide:

    http://www.swimmersguide.com/ViewFacility.aspx?fid=381

    I've swam at ISHOF, too, and it IS a great pool. Nothing beats swimming LC for an hour in the cool water under a hot FL sun!


    Thanks! When I swam there, it was in pool #2 I think. It was 25 yards, but I remember it having like 20 lanes. The shallowest part was 9ft and the deepest part was 17ft. Considering the history of the ISHOF in Ft. Lauderdale, it's inexcusable for the city to not have maintained that facility.
    That is probably why ISHOF is seriously considering moving to another city and even another state. What is the ultra liberal city of Fort Lauderdale's excuse on this oneicon_question.gif
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    Jul 10, 2015 3:48 PM GMT
    Some info from the local paper, Sun Sentinel (disclaimer, I'm an editor there).

    Yes it's leaving Fort Lauderdale this year.

    The ISHOF needs substantial repairs. Its grandstands were condemned in 2011 and its pools don't meet current competition standards. The city loses more than $1 million a year operating the center, although a new complex would still lose hundreds of thousands of dollars annually.

    Hall officials were dissatisfied with the space the city allocated them. They felt left out of the planning and its director said the city was relying on an outdated competitive swimming model that wouldn't work without some type of water attraction that appealed to families. The city also refused to subsidize more of the hall's expenses.

    So they're leaving for Santa Clara, Calif.

    Meanwhile, Fort Lauderdale is planning a new $32 million aquatic center either at the same site (or, potentially, on a different site near Port Everglades).

    One of its existing, ground level Olympic-sized pools will now be the front of the redesigned complex, visible to passing traffic. Another 50-meter pool and dive pool will be atop a three-level parking garage. The diving platform would be wide enough to accommodate synchronized diving competitions and there has even been consideration of a super-tall platform that could be used for "cliff-diving" style competitions. The complex will also include an indoor training facility for divers.

    The top front of the building will be a glass-enclosed banquet facility with vistas to the ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway.

    As with everything in South Florida, it's controversial. The price tag keeps rising. It's still in the design phase.

    900x506
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    Jul 10, 2015 4:49 PM GMT
    Ave atque aquae! I hate to see any pool close, particularly 50m ones, but the older ones do cost a lot to maintain. Coral Gables has a pretty nice public pool on its western edge, and the current Sta. Clara Swim Club is an awesome facility.
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1272

    Jul 11, 2015 1:39 AM GMT
    David_Lauderdale saidSome info from the local paper, Sun Sentinel (disclaimer, I'm an editor there).

    Yes it's leaving Fort Lauderdale this year.

    The ISHOF needs substantial repairs. Its grandstands were condemned in 2011 and its pools don't meet current competition standards. The city loses more than $1 million a year operating the center, although a new complex would still lose hundreds of thousands of dollars annually.

    Hall officials were dissatisfied with the space the city allocated them. They felt left out of the planning and its director said the city was relying on an outdated competitive swimming model that wouldn't work without some type of water attraction that appealed to families. The city also refused to subsidize more of the hall's expenses.

    So they're leaving for Santa Clara, Calif.

    Meanwhile, Fort Lauderdale is planning a new $32 million aquatic center either at the same site (or, potentially, on a different site near Port Everglades).

    One of its existing, ground level Olympic-sized pools will now be the front of the redesigned complex, visible to passing traffic. Another 50-meter pool and dive pool will be atop a three-level parking garage. The diving platform would be wide enough to accommodate synchronized diving competitions and there has even been consideration of a super-tall platform that could be used for "cliff-diving" style competitions. The complex will also include an indoor training facility for divers.

    The top front of the building will be a glass-enclosed banquet facility with vistas to the ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway.

    As with everything in South Florida, it's controversial. The price tag keeps rising. It's still in the design phase.

    900x506


    Thanks for the info, but what I don't get, is why didn't they just combine the ISHOF into the new complex?
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    Jul 11, 2015 2:05 AM GMT
    ChicagoSteve said
    Thanks for the info, but what I don't get, is why didn't they just combine the ISHOF into the new complex?

    I don't understand, either. And losing the name "International Swimming Hall of Fame" would certainly diminish the draw of whatever Fort Lauderdale builds in its place.

    Did you know Johnny Weismuller ("Tarzan") used to swim there, long after his Olympic Gold Medalist and Hollywood days? They have a swimming museum and archives, which presumably would be removed, further reducing the tourist value of whatever replaces it.

    Our personal attorney is a Fort Lauderdale City Commissioner, I expect to see him at an LGBT fundraising function in almost 2 weeks. I usually avoid talking city issues with him at these events, but I'll see if he's receptive to this topic, and what he says about it.
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1272

    Jul 11, 2015 2:37 AM GMT
    Thanks Art, I would love to hear what the feedback is. The ISHOF was incorporated in Ft. Lauderdale in 1964. That is 51 years of history with the city of Ft. Lauderdale. It's a damn shame the city would throw that away.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14310

    Jul 11, 2015 2:40 AM GMT
    ChicagoSteve said
    David_Lauderdale saidSome info from the local paper, Sun Sentinel (disclaimer, I'm an editor there).

    Yes it's leaving Fort Lauderdale this year.

    The ISHOF needs substantial repairs. Its grandstands were condemned in 2011 and its pools don't meet current competition standards. The city loses more than $1 million a year operating the center, although a new complex would still lose hundreds of thousands of dollars annually.

    Hall officials were dissatisfied with the space the city allocated them. They felt left out of the planning and its director said the city was relying on an outdated competitive swimming model that wouldn't work without some type of water attraction that appealed to families. The city also refused to subsidize more of the hall's expenses.

    So they're leaving for Santa Clara, Calif.

    Meanwhile, Fort Lauderdale is planning a new $32 million aquatic center either at the same site (or, potentially, on a different site near Port Everglades).

    One of its existing, ground level Olympic-sized pools will now be the front of the redesigned complex, visible to passing traffic. Another 50-meter pool and dive pool will be atop a three-level parking garage. The diving platform would be wide enough to accommodate synchronized diving competitions and there has even been consideration of a super-tall platform that could be used for "cliff-diving" style competitions. The complex will also include an indoor training facility for divers.

    The top front of the building will be a glass-enclosed banquet facility with vistas to the ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway.

    As with everything in South Florida, it's controversial. The price tag keeps rising. It's still in the design phase.

    900x506


    Thanks for the info, but what I don't get, is why didn't they just combine the ISHOF into the new complex?
    Evidently it would make too much sense for urban politicians in Fort Lauderdale.
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    Jul 11, 2015 2:36 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    ChicagoSteve said
    David_Lauderdale saidSome info from the local paper, Sun Sentinel (disclaimer, I'm an editor there).

    Yes it's leaving Fort Lauderdale this year.

    The ISHOF needs substantial repairs. Its grandstands were condemned in 2011 and its pools don't meet current competition standards. The city loses more than $1 million a year operating the center, although a new complex would still lose hundreds of thousands of dollars annually.

    Hall officials were dissatisfied with the space the city allocated them. They felt left out of the planning and its director said the city was relying on an outdated competitive swimming model that wouldn't work without some type of water attraction that appealed to families. The city also refused to subsidize more of the hall's expenses.

    So they're leaving for Santa Clara, Calif.

    Meanwhile, Fort Lauderdale is planning a new $32 million aquatic center either at the same site (or, potentially, on a different site near Port Everglades).

    One of its existing, ground level Olympic-sized pools will now be the front of the redesigned complex, visible to passing traffic. Another 50-meter pool and dive pool will be atop a three-level parking garage. The diving platform would be wide enough to accommodate synchronized diving competitions and there has even been consideration of a super-tall platform that could be used for "cliff-diving" style competitions. The complex will also include an indoor training facility for divers.

    The top front of the building will be a glass-enclosed banquet facility with vistas to the ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway.

    As with everything in South Florida, it's controversial. The price tag keeps rising. It's still in the design phase.

    900x506


    Thanks for the info, but what I don't get, is why didn't they just combine the ISHOF into the new complex?
    Evidently it would make too much sense for urban politicians in Fort Lauderdale.


    Perhaps too much money being thrown at alcohol counseling and other "vital services" in Wilted Manners?
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    Jul 11, 2015 4:54 PM GMT
    MGINSD said
    roadbikeRob said
    ChicagoSteve said
    David_Lauderdale saidSome info from the local paper, Sun Sentinel (disclaimer, I'm an editor there).

    Yes it's leaving Fort Lauderdale this year.

    The ISHOF needs substantial repairs. Its grandstands were condemned in 2011 and its pools don't meet current competition standards. The city loses more than $1 million a year operating the center, although a new complex would still lose hundreds of thousands of dollars annually.

    Hall officials were dissatisfied with the space the city allocated them. They felt left out of the planning and its director said the city was relying on an outdated competitive swimming model that wouldn't work without some type of water attraction that appealed to families. The city also refused to subsidize more of the hall's expenses.

    So they're leaving for Santa Clara, Calif.

    Meanwhile, Fort Lauderdale is planning a new $32 million aquatic center either at the same site (or, potentially, on a different site near Port Everglades).

    One of its existing, ground level Olympic-sized pools will now be the front of the redesigned complex, visible to passing traffic. Another 50-meter pool and dive pool will be atop a three-level parking garage. The diving platform would be wide enough to a ccommodate synchronized diving competitions and there has even been consideration of a super-tall platform that could be used for "cliff-diving" style competitions. The complex will also include an indoor training facility for divers.

    The top front of the building will be a glass-enclosed banquet facility with vistas to the ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway.

    As with everything in South Florida, it's controversial. The price tag keeps rising. It's still in the design phase.

    900x506


    Thanks for the info, but what I don't get, is why didn't they just combine the ISHOF into the new complex?
    Evidently it would make too much sense for urban politicians in Fort Lauderdale.


    Perhaps too much money being thrown at alcohol counseling and other "vital services" in Wilted Manners?


    Yikes, that design. It looks pretty on paper, all balanced and shit, but the functionality looks to me bullshit because the dive pool is used way less so it should not be isolated, certainly not isolated and then put out front where it will look abandoned most of the time. Looks like it was designed as an expensive TV studio for filming occasional dive shots, not for actual use.

    I swam laps there regularly so somewhat familiar with the place. The nonsense there seemed to me a battle of egos with the Hall making an absolute ass of itself, leveraging until it diminished whatever prestige it once held. Pity. In that battle of ego, they divorced themselves from the community that hosted them for fifty years. I swam there more than 30 of that.

    This stupidity has been going on for what like 10 years already. I got so sick of watching them run around for a developer like a chicken without its head for so long that I stopped following the issue. They turned that institution from venerable to pathetic.

    As to the description bolded above, that's either nonsense or written incorrectly. The existing front pool currently runs long-wise N to S so the dive pool pictured in the rendering is brand new, not existing. Nor is it shown at street level but up one so traffic would not see the pool but only the towering platform.

    My personal feeling is that the Hall should eat seagull and stay put. I have a great deal of gratitude for having had use of the facility for so many years. There were good people there and they even helped me with my mom during her years of Alzheimer's, keeping an eye on her while I did my swims. She loved those pools. Even towards the end of her illness, with just one arm coming out of the water as she started confusing her strokes, and then watching what used to be one of the most graceful strokes I've seen turn into doggy paddling 50 meters across and she'd do a few of those lengths each swim with the guards knowing to keep watch. And then that one day when I found her sitting on the edge and I swam over to her, asked what's wrong and she said "I just can't do this anymore."

    We used to watch dive competitions together. And it was wonderful to watch the diving (the events of which diminished over the years) while taking a breather at that far wall when long lanes where kept open during events. I used to love those pools. My mom loved it there too. Just the way it was. I still hope they stay.
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    Jul 11, 2015 5:48 PM GMT
    ChicagoSteve said
    Thanks Art, I would love to hear what the feedback is. The ISHOF was incorporated in Ft. Lauderdale in 1964. That is 51 years of history with the city of Ft. Lauderdale. It's a damn shame the city would throw that away.

    OK. And I may see our attorney sooner than the scheduled fundraiser, we run into him periodically around town.

    I can't figure out the issues involved. A lot of finger pointing between the ISHOF and the City. And you only hear a summarized story as reported, usually without much of the in-depth backstory.

    You would think Fort Lauderdale would want to keep such a tourist attraction. There are directional signs for it out on I-95, and along the local surface roads, and it's right near the principle Fort Lauderdale beaches and big hotels. What could be more natural for a city that derives much of its income from the beaches and swimming? You would think that's a no-brainer.

    But typically in these disputes it seems to be about money, as I understand. Each side complaining about broken obligations and acting in bad faith. So you both end up killing the goose that could lay the golden egg for you.

    The Founding Chairman of the ISHOF was Johnny Weismuller, 5-time individual Olympic US Gold Medalist for swimming, and a Bronze for team, 52 US national championships, and 67 world swimming records, some of which stood for as long as 17 years. We mostly remember him as Hollywood's Tarzan now, but he was one of the greatest swimmers in history, maybe THE greatest.

    I can't believe Fort Lauderdale is gonna let that get away from them. But then I think the City is bedazzled by millions of dollars in corporate growth, and something like a "swimming pool" doesn't interest them. I'll see if I can learn more.