I almost drowned today.

  • DiogoT94

    Posts: 22

    Jul 09, 2015 10:59 PM GMT
    Let me tell you how it started.
    »I came with a group of friends to the beach and everything was great until we went to the water. The weather was great and no particularly large waves. We were there for like half an hour, when we we're about to go to the shore, I saw a friend of mine Rui a bit distant from us so I told the group to just reunite with him and go back. As we approched I lost my feet, I couldn't touch the sand anymore, it was like a big hole. I sort of panicked but got myself back together (I can't swim). My group got together again and we said to just go back, I was tired from the gym and sports with them, and I had lost my feet again, but this time not only me but my whole group, the sea had raised its level really quickly. We swam(I sort of did, I think) to the direction of the shore, but the sea was pushing us, it was really dificult for me, I barely had any strenght left and the sea was pushing really hard I couldn't get any distance from the shore to myself, it was still so far. Somehow with effort I managed to cut the distance by half when the waves started to calm down, we we're six,and three of them were already at the shore. I had finally got myself to lay my feet in the sand and paused to rest, my friend daniel kept going at the shore after passing me. I was dumb to stop there, I kept calling him and saying that it was fine but he didn't answer me or even looked back(smart one). I counted 4 of them with Daniel going towards the shore, I look back and Joseph was waving his hands and going down and up, I guessed he needed help and had no feet there. Probabbly dumb of me, I went towards him (knowing that I can't swim) and try to help him. We ended both helpless and waiting for help, because I couldn't literally do anything. I couldn't swim or even keep myself from jumping from the sand to up the water again and repeat. I was so tired yet all I was thinking about was, how can I get out of here, I know literally nothing about waves and I just kept being analytical(this could be a good joke but, not going there). Two of my friends helped us(great swimmers) I was having breathing troubles(asthma, barely ever happens but fantastic timing) and I couldn't barely move my legs/arms. I totally relied on them to save me.
    »What I want go with this is, that I did not prioritize my life or even thought about it, what if I had given up, would I? I don't seem troubled yet I think I could've pushed myself a little more but I don't know. Its like I wasn't trying my best to save myself atleast.
    »But what pisses me of, is that I needed to be saved. I hate the fact that I had to rely on someone to stay here at this moment, call it pride, ego, whatever. What is troubling me currently is only that. icon_confused.gif
    »I could've died today, but what's wrong with me is that I think it could've been avoided, being saved and/or being trapped.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 09, 2015 11:03 PM GMT
    didn't read that
    Just wanted to put my 2 cents and say, almost doesn't count

    I almost drowned in childhood when I was 7 , me and friend went swimming, stepped too deep, did not know how to swim, was unconscious, only woke up on the shore when I was pulled out of the water and saved
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 10, 2015 12:51 AM GMT
    My illusion of the great Portuguese sailors now shattered, glad you survived it, now get over the fact that you were saved and be thankful instead and learn the fuck to swim.

    Until then, get yourself a Portuguese Water Dog just to be safe

    7263603_orig.jpg?1330373325

    He can be your swim buddy. "Does everyone have their buddy?" That was a common call out in summer camp. You swim with your swim buddy to make sure you're safe. So had you taken early lessons, you'd have known it natural that one person might have to save the other guy or the other way around. Unless you had a water resistant app to call for an uber dolphin to give you a ride home.

    Also it sounds like a rip tide might have caught you. Those are the currents that pull you away from shore. Next time if you can swim a little, instead of swimming to shore, swim horizontal to shore until you feel you are out of the current, then head in. Or just float on your back or tread water until it passes and then make your way back in. Or just try to maintain position without exerting more energy to fight the current to make headway. Then head in after it dies down.

    I was pulled out to sea once as a little kid, I'd guess about three or four. But I could swim. I remember being pulled off the shore by a wave and I somehow made it out to a piling of the remnants an old pier way offshore. I don't remember the swim part but I did swim from when I was a babe so I guess that's how I got to the pier. I held on for dear life. That part I recall. I remember seeing tiny people on shore and the guard who swam out to me. I seem to remember him having trouble getting me to let go of the piling but I'm not sure if that's just imagination or memory. I don't remember him bringing me back to shore. The next thing I remember was being in the infirmary and them putting iodine all over me. I was head to toe slashed by barnacles. But mostly I remember the lifeguard was cute and I've had a lifeguard fetish ever since.

    But definitely get your fucking ass into swim lessons. You still might need one day to be saved, but more likely you'll save yourself and maybe save a swim buddy too.

    swimming_buddy_check.gif

    swimmingbuddies.jpg

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  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    Jul 10, 2015 1:00 AM GMT
    How ppl dont know how to swim is beyond me?

    I could understand if you're like a 5 year old and can't swim, but as an adult? Come on. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Also, it was stupid to think u could go rescue ur friend when u can't even swim. You now make it that much more dangerous and unlikey to be rescued.


    Anyway, glad you're alive. Learn to fucking swim now.
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    Jul 10, 2015 3:09 AM GMT
    Too long to read, but I worked as a life guard in my early 20s icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 10, 2015 8:03 AM GMT
    Glad you were saved. I guess you could use this an a motivation to learn how to swim.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 10, 2015 2:50 PM GMT
    Import saidHow ppl dont know how to swim is beyond me?

    I could understand if you're like a 5 year old and can't swim, but as an adult? Come on. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Also, it was stupid to think u could go rescue ur friend when u can't even swim. You now make it that much more dangerous and unlikey to be rescued.


    Anyway, glad you're alive. Learn to fucking swim now.

    Completely agree. Learn to swim.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jul 10, 2015 3:00 PM GMT
    Swimming is so critical, we've talked about it on my weekly fitness program on webradio. Doesn't matter if you like spending time in the water or not, I think basic swimming instruction is just critical.

    So very glad you are well and can tell us about what happened and an eye opener to others!
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    Jul 10, 2015 3:13 PM GMT
    Wow, thanks for sharing!

    I see that you are 20. In the US most universities have PE classes that students can take for free, including swimming at all levels. You might look into that wherever you are.
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    Jul 10, 2015 3:17 PM GMT
    socalfitness said
    Import saidHow ppl dont know how to swim is beyond me?

    I could understand if you're like a 5 year old and can't swim, but as an adult? Come on. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Also, it was stupid to think u could go rescue ur friend when u can't even swim. You now make it that much more dangerous and unlikey to be rescued.


    Anyway, glad you're alive. Learn to fucking swim now.

    Completely agree. Learn to swim.


    Or stay on shore and out of the water.

    p.s. I nearly drowned in a sea of your words. In future remember: Short and sweet.
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    Jul 10, 2015 3:19 PM GMT
    My first year at boys summer camp I hadn't yet learned to swim. So I was put in a shallow wooden "pen" with other young boys, that was half-submerged at the edge of our lake. I never learned to swim that year.

    Next summer when I returned the swimming counselors remembered me. But mistakenly thought I could swim. I was brought out onto the big dock with other boys, about 40 feet into the lake, and told to get in the water. Well, I try to follow orders, especially when I was 9.

    And I didn't sink or drown! I was shocked! Floated around like a leaf. A swimming counselor said I was doing really well, I had remembered last year's lessons. I yelled back up to him this was my first time in deep open water, I'd never swum before.

    He questioned me about that several times, getting concerned. But I was doing great and he didn't order me out of the water. Things were a lot more lax in the 1950s.

    Flip forward to the 1980s. I was an Army Major teaching college ROTC, on Christmas leave here in South Florida. I went to the Hollywood beach and did some ocean swimming.

    Went out too far and suddenly got exhausted. I started to go under. Ironic, because back on campus I taught drown proofing. But the water survival techniques I taught assume you aren't already gasping for air.

    I considered waving for the lifeguard, but didn't want that embarrassment. I used my last strength to swim for the shore. When I got to my spot on the beach I collapsed, panting as if I'd just run a marathon race. A few people came over and asked if I was OK, but I gasped that I was, just a little winded. icon_eek.gif

    I've never swum out that far since.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 10, 2015 4:59 PM GMT
    socalfitness said
    Import saidHow ppl dont know how to swim is beyond me?

    I could understand if you're like a 5 year old and can't swim, but as an adult? Come on. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Also, it was stupid to think u could go rescue ur friend when u can't even swim. You now make it that much more dangerous and unlikey to be rescued.


    Anyway, glad you're alive. Learn to fucking swim now.

    Completely agree. Learn to swim.


    Likewise, I agree.

    One cannot even graduate from high school in the State of California unless one can swim the crawl stroke 50 yards (I think it was).

    It is foolhardy to go into the water if one cannot swim, be it a back yard swimming pool, a river, a lake, or the ocean. Full stop. Every year one reads in the newspaper of several people who cannot swim drowning while playing along the river, often in shallow water and stepping into an unexpected hole. It is the unanticipated, unexpected situation which kills.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Jul 10, 2015 6:38 PM GMT
    It's good that you didn't actually drown.

    People who cannot swim should not go into the water at all unless it is completely calm. Even then, in the ocean they should not go in more than ankle deep. There are too many things that can happen. Deep holes are common, especially after a storm.

    Even good swimmers should not be swimming in the ocean unless they know about rip currents and how to handle them. They can be strong enough to throw you off of your feet even if you are in only knee deep. Often it is completely impossible to swim against them and those who try can drown. They are fairly narrow so, if one knows how, it is easy to get out of one. You just swim parallel to the beach until you are out of the rip current after which you can easily swim in.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Jul 10, 2015 6:42 PM GMT
    Import saidHow ppl dont know how to swim is beyond me?

    I could understand if you're like a 5 year old and can't swim, but as an adult? Come on. icon_rolleyes.gif

    Also, it was stupid to think u could go rescue ur friend when u can't even swim. You now make it that much more dangerous and unlikey to be rescued.


    Anyway, glad you're alive. Learn to fucking swim now.


    Knowing how to swim is not enough!

    One can learn how to swim simply through watching videos, but that is very different from being able to swim. Being able to swim requires some practice and experience.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Jul 10, 2015 6:48 PM GMT
    Art_Deco saidMy first year at boys summer camp I hadn't yet learned to swim. So I was put in a shallow wooden "pen" with other young boys, that was half-submerged at the edge of our lake. I never learned to swim that year.

    Next summer when I returned the swimming counselors remembered me. But mistakenly thought I could swim. I was brought out onto the big dock with other boys, about 40 feet into the lake, and told to get in the water. Well, I try to follow orders, especially when I was 9.

    And I didn't sink or drown! I was shocked! Floated around like a leaf. A swimming counselor said I was doing really well, I had remembered last year's lessons. I yelled back up to him this was my first time in deep open water, I'd never swum before.

    He questioned me about that several times, getting concerned. But I was doing great and he didn't order me out of the water. Things were a lot more lax in the 1950s.

    Flip forward to the 1980s. I was an Army Major teaching college ROTC, on Christmas leave here in South Florida. I went to the beach and did some ocean swimming.

    Went out too far and suddenly got exhausted. I started to go under. Ironic, because back on campus I taught drown proofing. But the water survival techniques I taught assume you aren't already gasping for air.

    I considered waving for the lifeguard, but didn't want that embarrassment. I used my last strength to swim for the shore. When I got to my spot on the beach I collapsed, panting as if I'd just run a marathon race. A few people came over and asked if I was OK, but I gasped that I was, just a little winded. icon_eek.gif

    I've never swum out that far since.


    Drown proofing is good to know. In my opinion, it should be taught before teaching swimming because some people may not return for additional lessons. Besides, it is helpful when tired.

    Some people refer to drown proofing as useless bobbing in the water; it is not! Of course people should also learn to swim, but they should also know drown proofing.

    In my first year of college I took lifesaving. It is also good for people to know that too.

    When I lived in Minneapolis, I used to swim across the Mississippi river and back and also across Cedar Lake and around Twin Lake. People would ask me whether I was afraid if getting a cramp. Actually a cramp is not a fatal condition unless one panics.
  • jeep334

    Posts: 409

    Jul 10, 2015 8:40 PM GMT
    So glad everything ended up OK. I can understand your feelings of discouragement but trying not to sound like an arrogant asshole, we truly do learn from our mistakes. You were fortunate in the whole experience.

    I almost drowned when I was a kid. I had gone out to far in the pool of water fed by a huge waterfall formed in a gorge. I was screaming and bobbing up and down waving my arms but my parents thought I was just waving to them so they smiled from shore and waved back. Fortunately my cocker spaniel sensed I needed help and he swam out to get me. He let me garb onto him and we paddled together to shore to now a very distressed mother and father who caught on what to was going on. He was my savior and my best friend and I consider myself fortunate to have had him in my life for his entire lifetime.

    The advise you've received here from the other guys is the best: Take some basic swimming lessons and have a dog for your companion. The dog, by the way, is a real magnet for other guys while you're walking him or playing with him in the park. Although they might tend to hog the bed, that's just another way you know you're loved. icon_cool.gif
  • FredMG

    Posts: 988

    Jul 10, 2015 11:11 PM GMT
    That really was quite the read.

    If you take anything away from this, learn that you have limits, and when you're already tired don't go out swimming and show a little courage and tell your friends "No" and sit on the beach.
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    Jul 11, 2015 3:02 AM GMT
    This week on NPR in the morning, a segment was about teaching infants and toddlers how to float. They wouldn't graduate their class until they were fully dressed for a winter's day and then put in a pool because some children drown that way.
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    Jul 11, 2015 3:12 AM GMT
    DiogoT94:

    what pisses me of, is that I needed to be saved.

    Stephenoabc:

    You were out of your league.
    You were over your head.

    If you don't have the skills, don't do the hard problems.

    Unprepared.

    Put yourself in unprepared situations, you will need to be saved.

    Be more grateful than pissed off.

    Feel lucky, not pissed off. Listen and Watch:

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    Jul 11, 2015 3:29 AM GMT
    That post of "People" with Omar Sharif is another one of my moments of what Jung referred to as Synchronicity.

    After making that post, I looked at my Roku3 on my television and clicked on an AOL news item. Who's that guy who looks a little like Laurence Olivier, I thought. Then I read "Lawrence of Arabia" Actor Dead at 83. The actor was Omar Sharif.

    On YouTube, there was another popular version of Barbara singing that song. Should I listen? No, this suffices. Little "basta" [enough]. (Why? because it is about Omar, not your teenage memories of Barbara Streisand albums.)
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    Jul 11, 2015 4:38 AM GMT
    DiogoT94 saidI almost drowned today.
    I would normally say "suck it up" but that would probably make the situation worse. icon_razz.gif