Best & Worst Cities for Recreation 2015

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2015 7:36 PM GMT
    http://wallethub.com/edu/best-worst-cities-for-recreation/5144/
    best-worst-cities-for-recreation-badges.

    1 Cincinnati, OH
    2 Omaha, NE
    3 Scottsdale, AZ
    4 Tampa, FL
    5 Boise, ID
    6 Orlando, FL
    7 Minneapolis, MN
    8 St. Louis, MO
    9 Reno, NV
    10 Denver, CO

    91 Anaheim, CA
    92 Garland, TX
    93 Fremont, CA
    94 North Las Vegas, NV
    95 Chula Vista, CA
    96 Hialeah, FL
    97 Laredo, TX
    98 Irving, TX
    99 Newark, NJ
    100 Jersey City, NJ


    (wasn't sure proper category, could have gone with travel or news or general fitness or recreational sex so I just threw it here. Relocate if required.)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 14, 2015 3:26 PM GMT
    So the takeaway is to go to Cincinnati instead of Disneyland in Anaheim.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14335

    Jul 14, 2015 4:15 PM GMT
    desertmuscl saidSo the takeaway is to go to Cincinnati instead of Disneyland in Anaheim.
    Despite the fact that it has the urban problems typical of older northern cities, Cincinnati is stil a beautiful urban gem where much of an older, more elegant cityscape is fully intact. Don't let its Midwestern location fool you, Cincinnati is very hilly and very green and it is both a runners and cyclists paradise. It's location on the mighty Ohio River also helps make it a wonderful location for aquatic oriented activities. It is a very historic and architecturally beautiful city with a lot of wonderful old neighborhoods of historic red brick homes and buildings shaded by large trees. Cincy has come a long way in only a decade in regards to gay and lesbian rights and rights for other minority groups as well. It is not as boring, backward, and ultra conservative as it is unfairly percieved to be by coast huggers and extremist liberal hens.
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    Jul 14, 2015 5:04 PM GMT
    Chula Vista so low? Get real! We have a branch of the US Olympic Training Center here, miles of bike and hiking trails all over SD Cty., marinas, parks and natural areas everywhere, and more coming all the time. I think the editors of this report were casting about for blanks to fill by the time they got into the 90s.
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    Jul 14, 2015 6:23 PM GMT
    desertmuscl saidSo the takeaway is to go to Cincinnati instead of Disneyland in Anaheim.



    MGINSD saidChula Vista so low? Get real! We have a branch of the US Olympic Training Center here, miles of bike and hiking trails all over SD Cty., marinas, parks and natural areas everywhere, and more coming all the time. I think the editors of this report were casting about for blanks to fill by the time they got into the 90s.

    http://wallethub.com/edu/best-worst-cities-for-recreation/5144/#methodology
    Methodology
    To find the best and worst cities for recreation, WalletHub compared the 100 most populated U.S. cities across four key dimensions, including: 1) Entertainment & Recreational Facilities, 2) Costs, 3) Quality of Parks and 4) Climate. We then identified 27 relevant metrics, which are listed below with their corresponding weights. Please note that “city” refers to city proper and excludes surrounding metro areas.

    Entertainment & Recreational Facilities – Total weight: 10
    •Number of Music Venues per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight
    •Number of Coffee & Tea Shops per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight
    •Number of Public Beaches per 100,000 Residents: Half Weight
    •Number of Tennis Courts per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight
    •Number of Public Golf Courses per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight
    •Number of Public Swimming Pools per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight
    •Number of Ball Diamonds per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight
    •Number of Basketball Hoops per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight
    •Number of Bike Rental Facilities per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight
    •Number of Attractions: Double Weight
    •Number of Food Festivals per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight
    •WalletHub “Sports Fans” Ranking: Full Weight
    Note: Includes football, basketball, baseball and hockey.

    Costs – Total weight: 10
    •Spending on Parks per Capita: Half Weight
    •Average Fitness Club Fee: Full Weight
    •Movie Costs: Full Weight
    •Bowling Costs: Full Weight
    •Grooming Costs: Full Weight
    •Average Beverage Price (Heineken’s, 6-pack, 12-oz. containers, excluding any deposit; 1.5-liter bottle, Chablis or Chenin Blanc or any white table wine): Full Weight
    •Average Food Price: Full Weight
    •Prevalence of Affordable 4.5+ Star Restaurants: Full Weight

    Quality of Parks – Total weight: 5
    •Percentage of the Population with Walkable Park Access: Full Weight
    •Percent of Designed Parkland Areas: Full Weight
    •Presence on TripAdvisor’s “Top 25 Parks” List: Half Weight
    •Park Playgrounds per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight
    •Parkland as Percentage of City Area: Full Weight
    •Acres of Parkland per 100,000 Residents: Full Weight

    Climate – Total weight: 2.5

    Source: Data used to create these rankings were obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Council for Community and Economic Research, The Trust for Public Land, Yelp.com, Tripadvisor, Numbeo and WalletHub Research.


    and PS

    It looks like your sports facility is only open to the public for a total of two programs. So even though it's a big place, I'd imagine state of the art, it's not really open to the public enough to be counted.

    http://www.teamusa.org/About-the-USOC/Training-Centers-and-Sites/Chula-Vista/Visit
    Sport Programs Open to the Community
    The CVOTC is the host location for two ongoing and open-to-the-public development programs. Chula Vista BMX operates the BMX track next to the Visitor Center on Tuesday evenings and Saturday afternoons. A Thursday evening clinic is also offered and more information can be found at ChulaBMX.com. Additionally, Roadrunner Archery operates the club program at the archery range on Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays. More information can be found at RoadrunnerArchery.com.
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    Jul 19, 2015 4:06 PM GMT
    This ranking is extremely stupid if you guys click on the link and look at it more closely.

    Among the things they use to measure how "good" a city is on recreation is movie theater ticket prices, bowling prices, and the price of an alcoholic beverage, without taking local incomes and cost of living into consideration.

    Another measure is amount of park space as a percentage of city area. However, more park space isn't necessarily better. More doesn't equal quality, and at some point there's diminishing returns. After all, these are supposed to be cities, not rural areas.

    They also include amount of park space in proportion to city's population size. What they leave out is the ease with which residents can reach a park (distance + transportation options...can I walk to my local park?). This shortsighted approach partly explains why Tampa does so well and Jersey City does so poorly in the ranking when it should be the other way around if you ask me.

    Under entertainment and recreational facilities, "number of attractions" receives "double weight", but what exactly these attractions are is a mystery.

    The way they weight different activities is odd; beaches receives half weight, but golf courses receive full weight. Why are golf courses more important?

    Climate is an unfair gauge, IMO. What if people like winter sports? Skating, skateboarding, and skiing?

    It also would have been a bit more accurate to rank metropolitan areas, not individual municipalities.

    Totally stupid. Take it with a huge grain of salt.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14335

    Jul 19, 2015 5:46 PM GMT
    pazkilimanjaro saidThey ain't lying about Newark and jersey city or any city in jersey for that matter or the state for that matter. Jersey is just a place to live and work. There isn't much to do in terms of recreation and you need money if you plan on doing anything thats fun. There's a lot of fast food spots and if you're not active, you can easily just drift away.
    Wait a minute Paz, I wouldn't paint the entire state of New Jersey with such a broad and somewhat negative brush. Have you ever been to Cape May County? That is definitely not like Newark, Jersey City, Trenton, and all the urban/suburban sprawl along the I-95 and U.S. Route 1 corridors. New Jersey's Cape May is a mostly pristine rural county of sandy beaches, pine forests, historic small towns and villages, and bucolic wetlands. Most of southern New Jersey or South Jersey is rural and heavily wooded. It is just in and around Camden and Atlantic City where the urban/suburban sprawl is commonplace with all its heavy traffic and other drawbacks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 19, 2015 10:54 PM GMT
    Best cities for recreation: The ones I go to.

    Worst cities for recreation: The ones I don't go to.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14335

    Jul 20, 2015 12:06 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidBest cities for recreation: The ones I go to.

    Worst cities for recreation: The ones I don't go to.
    Maybe you should visit both Newark and Jersey City for a recreational trip.icon_lol.gif Hey you never know you might end finding a lot of good, fun things in New Jersey's two largest cities.icon_lol.gif
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    Jul 20, 2015 5:00 PM GMT
    jjguy05 saidThis ranking is extremely stupid if you guys click on the link and look at it more closely.

    ...They also include amount of park space in proportion to city's population size. What they leave out is the ease with which residents can reach a park (distance + transportation options...can I walk to my local park?). This shortsighted approach partly explains why Tampa does so well and Jersey City does so poorly in the ranking when it should be the other way around if you ask me.


    Most such published lists prey on the "anyone from Chicago in the audience" factor. I like both Jersey City and Tampa so I'm not partial. I even did a junior high social studies paper on Jersey City and growing up for a while the ol'man kept a boat at a marina there. So just to note that I'm familiar with that and even more familiar with Tampa.

    To look at parkland itself, and as you indicate access to it, Tampa & the surrounding Tampa Bay region affords unusually excellent access to large expanses of nature, better even than south Florida which itself is pretty excellent.

    To your point of being able to walk to any park, Jersey City might (I'd have to study that) more so claim that as an aspect of living in a densely urbanized area as opposed to a more sprawled urban area. But just what are you walking to, a total of a few square miles of man-made park? There is simply no comparison. Not just of size but of character.

    Tampa has five times the land mass while Jersey City has 25% less people: it would be silly to even attempt comparing acreage of parkland immediately available to the public.

    Besides neighborhood parks, swimming pools, etc., the public parks along the causeways, a winding river through it with parks along that, access to the bays and the gulf, and now building a riverwalk downtown--immediately adjacent to Tampa is a 16,000-acre wilderness that pretty much blows anything else away with hiking, biking(both paved and off road) etc. and that's this...

    lowerhillsborough.gif

    Where it says "New Tampa" on that map is actually incorporated Tampa. So you can see that the access to wilderness is immediate--very few cities have such resource--even if just a short drive or a quick bike ride to where any particular individual might live by the sprawling developmental pattern of Florida. I was not at all surprised to see them high on the list.

    And it's not even access to it, which is very easy in Tampa, but what you get when you get there. A Jersey City urban oasis is nice but Tampa has not just urban living but adjacency to wilderness, water to one side and woods to the other. There's wild turkey and boar and gators and coyote, turtles, all sorts of stuff. You can hardly go out into the bays around Tampa and the Bay region without a dolphin sighting. Such encounters don't exist in Jersey City.

    PS. Tampa also has this odd but cool claim to recreational fame...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayshore_Boulevard
    Bayshore Boulevard is a waterfront road on Hillsborough Bay in South Tampa, Florida. Located south of downtown Tampa, its sidewalk, claimed to be the longest continuous sidewalk in the world at 4.5 miles (7.2 km) long, is 10 feet (3.0 m) wide and is widely used for recreation and exercise. The 3-mile (4.8 km) bike lane, a linear park, and the Bayshore Greenway Trail provide scenic views of urban Tampa and the water.[1][2] Many large and historic homes line the road, as well as business including the Colonnade (restaurant), a historic seafood restaurant established in 1935. The Gasparilla Children's parade is held on a section of the road.
    Tampa_Bayshore_Blvd_looking_south01.jpg