wine/alcohol in general

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 29, 2009 1:20 AM GMT
    i havent drank since high school, which is almost 3 years. just wondering peoples opinions on it drinking (from a nutritional point of view that is) . how much is good/bad? is there a disadvantage to those who dont drink at all? just want some feedback, i know its a general question...
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Feb 02, 2009 10:15 PM GMT
    It's really not all that great for you. If your goal is to build muscle, lose fat, and generally have the best health possible, alcohol probably doesn't fit into the equation.

    That being said, everyone needs to cut loose every once in a while. Only you can judge how much is too much.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Feb 02, 2009 10:22 PM GMT
    On the health side, certain kinds of alcohol (primarily red wines) have the ability to clean out your system. Although this does not dispute the above post.
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    Feb 02, 2009 10:22 PM GMT
    that's why you drink white russians icon_smile.gif

    the milk gives me strong bones, i had to drink all 8 glasses the other night too!!

  • SeaMichael

    Posts: 138

    Feb 02, 2009 10:25 PM GMT
    Considering the caloric intake, I always try to drink until I vomit...that way not only do I not get the calories from the booze, but I also get to lose some of what I had for dinner! YAY!



    (totally kidding, btw)


    I think the key is really to not overdo the drinking, and not drink all the time. Wine has a lot of calories, as does any beer worth drinking. Liquor isn't as bad, but the mixers can hurt.

    When I do the drinking, I stick to diet coke (with Whisky or Rum) or diet tonic (with Vodka), or no mixer at all. This serves multiple purposes - on the one hand, it means I'm not adding to the lilquor calories (which, in a drink that I pour, are about 70-90). Also, because the way that the body processes alcohol, I'm less likely to over drink, and get buzzed quicker (your body processes alcohol the same way as it does sugar. Sugar, however, is easier to process, so when you drink with regular soda or other sugary mixers, your body will process the sugar first, and the alcohol will start to build up, and then hit really fucking hard after you've finished drinking. Cutting out the sugar forces the body to deal with the alcohol, and so you get buzzed quicker, and, in theory, stop drinking quicker).
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Feb 02, 2009 10:27 PM GMT
    mookie5381 saidConsidering the caloric intake, I always try to drink until I vomit...that way not only do I not get the calories from the booze, but I also get to lose some of what I had for dinner! YAY!


    Win. Thread over.
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Feb 03, 2009 12:13 AM GMT
    mookie5381 saidConsidering the caloric intake, I always try to drink until I vomit...that way not only do I not get the calories from the booze, but I also get to lose some of what I had for dinner! YAY!



    (totally kidding, btw)


    I think the key is really to not overdo the drinking, and not drink all the time. Wine has a lot of calories, as does any beer worth drinking. Liquor isn't as bad, but the mixers can hurt.

    When I do the drinking, I stick to diet coke (with Whisky or Rum) or diet tonic (with Vodka), or no mixer at all. This serves multiple purposes - on the one hand, it means I'm not adding to the lilquor calories (which, in a drink that I pour, are about 70-90). Also, because the way that the body processes alcohol, I'm less likely to over drink, and get buzzed quicker (your body processes alcohol the same way as it does sugar. Sugar, however, is easier to process, so when you drink with regular soda or other sugary mixers, your body will process the sugar first, and the alcohol will start to build up, and then hit really fucking hard after you've finished drinking. Cutting out the sugar forces the body to deal with the alcohol, and so you get buzzed quicker, and, in theory, stop drinking quicker).


    along the same lines, studies have shown that artificial sugars can increase drunkenness. I remember the story on the local news a couple years ago, it had the preview before going to a commercial, "Do you use sugar free drinks to mix your alcohol? Stay tuned..."

    I thought, uh oh, that's what I do. Then they say it increases drunkenness. I thought, "What's the problem, here?"
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2009 12:54 AM GMT
    But what are the metabolic effects of just the alcohol? Not the sugars from mixers or the calories in beer. I tend to just go for any dark liquor straight up.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2009 12:58 AM GMT
    O good wine or beer is perfectly acceptable as long as you refrain from excess. I am also a fan of the occasional clear liquor (and only from good brands).

    That being said, I have stated before that I come from WASPs... so for us, moderation is about a bottle of wine with dinner (not recommended for others -hahaha).

    Seriously, a glass of wine or beer every so often is fine. It is just as bad as the occasional cake, pie, or cookie.
  • dionysus

    Posts: 420

    Feb 03, 2009 1:02 AM GMT
    studies show that drinking is actually beneficial. however, the limit to drinking is about 2 fl oz of hard liquor (2 shots), 12 fl oz of wine (2 TRUE glasses of win, p.s. filling your glass to the brim does not constitute a TRUE glass, unless its a 6oz. wine glass, in which case, what is wrong with you?) or 24 fl oz. of beer (7.5% alcohol/vol. TOPS).

    wine =/= port which has a higher alcohol volume. the 2 fl oz. is based off of the 35-40% alcohol/vol. hard liquors such as vodka, gin, rum, whiskey, cognac (dependant on the type)

    everything over 2 "drinks", however, can be bad news bears. but the majority of the "beer belly" that occurs is not actually the drinking but the desire to wane off the alcohol via highly greasy foods (for a reference, go to a local fast food joint at 2:15am and watch the drunks stumble in).
  • dionysus

    Posts: 420

    Feb 03, 2009 1:02 AM GMT
    scarabboy saidO good wine or beer is perfectly acceptable as long as you refrain from excess. I am also a fan of the occasional clear liquor (and only from good brands).

    That being said, I have stated before that I come from WASPs... so for us, moderation is about a bottle of wine with dinner (not recommended for others -hahaha).

    Seriously, a glass of wine or beer every so often is fine. It is just as bad as the occasional cake, pie, or cookie.


    a man after my own heart.
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Feb 03, 2009 1:03 AM GMT
    Matterych saidBut what are the metabolic effects of just the alcohol? Not the sugars from mixers or the calories in beer. I tend to just go for any dark liquor straight up.


    I'm pretty sure alcohol can increase cortisol levels.

    It also interferes with sleep, which has is its own effects on metabolic function.

  • SeaMichael

    Posts: 138

    Feb 03, 2009 1:03 AM GMT
    Matterych saidBut what are the metabolic effects of just the alcohol? Not the sugars from mixers or the calories in beer. I tend to just go for any dark liquor straight up.


    It metabolizes just like sugar.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2009 1:04 AM GMT
    TexanMan82 said
    mookie5381 saidConsidering the caloric intake, I always try to drink until I vomit...that way not only do I not get the calories from the booze, but I also get to lose some of what I had for dinner! YAY!


    along the same lines, studies have shown that artificial sugars can increase drunkenness. I remember the story on the local news a couple years ago, it had the preview before going to a commercial, "Do you use sugar free drinks to mix your alcohol? Stay tuned..."

    I thought, uh oh, that's what I do. Then they say it increases drunkenness. I thought, "What's the problem, here?"


    May I have a splash of Splenda with my vodka pleasssse...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2009 1:09 AM GMT
    Many alcoholic drinks contains significant anti-oxidants, and a small amount of alcohol can help with some diseases of aging, as well as provide medicinal uses for congestion / cough.

    Alcohol, however, taken in excess, can cause organ and tissue damage, as well as provide calories that don't count nutritive value.

    I suggest researching the benefits and problems of alcohol using your favorite search engine, and taking time to read for yourself the pros and cons.

    Because alcohol is not illegal like pot, it has had lots of study. There's lots of information online for you to form an informed opinion.

    caspervann said.. but the majority of the "beer belly" that occurs is not actually the drinking but the desire to wane off the alcohol via highly greasy foods (for a reference, go to a local fast food joint at 2:15am and watch the drunks stumble in).


    It should be pointed out that the above quote is somewhat in error. Many alcoholics have that "look" because they ingest insufficient protein and get idle calories from the alcohol, or just plain to many carbs. Caspervann also fails to accommodate for the effect of alcohol on insulin and blood glucose levels, which also contributes to the effect. It's not just from irresponsible eating, as the statement tends to make one believe.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2009 1:33 AM GMT
    3 months ago the New York Times reported a study in which lab mice were given large amounts of red wine. The mice lived to twice the age of non-wine drinking mice.

    The mice got the equivalent of 70 mouse-size glasses a day, so the study shouldn't be a guideline for human consumption. But it did pretty conclusively show that the antioxidants and resorcinols in the wine increased longevity.

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    Feb 10, 2009 5:45 AM GMT
    from what i can recall, the liver is the primary organ in the body that helps to metabolize lipids (fats). however, this function gets put on the back-burner when alcohol is consumed. since the liver also serves as the body's primary detox organ, it shifts the bulk of it's efforts to detoxing the body as opposed to metabolizing fats.

    i had a client that i kept at a decent caloric deficit so, in theory, he should have been losing a pound a week. the one thing he did not want to give up was his daily vodka intake. we took this into consideration and calculated the calories from the vodka into his overall caloric intake. in spite of the deficit, he was not losing weight as we were both becoming rather frustrated. then, due to an unrelated medical issue, he had to stop the vodka.

    from that point, he started to drop weight pretty damn fast. assuming that he was being honest with me on his diet and portion control the whole time, he claimed that the only thing he did differently was drop the vodka (which would increase his caloric deficit even further). i think it was at this time that i read about alcohol's effects on weight loss.

    (of course there is the possibility that once he sobered up, he actually adhered to his portion control sizes and that's where the real problem was, but i don't know. he did start dropping weight like crazy though.)

    so, i hope this helps.
  • FrontRowIn

    Posts: 133

    Feb 12, 2009 9:38 PM GMT
    More than the caloric intake, alcohol turns into sugar in the body. Sugar can be VERY bad for you when taken in large amounts. Having too much sugar can lead to a host of problems from weight gain to depression.

    I try to keep my sugar inake low (including hidden sugars, i.e. potatoes, white rice) and my drinking down to once a week.

    Also be sure to read label on food you buy, stuff low in fat tends to be high in sugar.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 12, 2009 9:46 PM GMT
    Blood sugar (glucose) is essential to good health, and the ability to perform physical work. Low glycemic index carbs (complex carbs, generally speaking are best). Carbs are an important part of a balanced diet. Inadequate carbs will cause you to be catabolic which normally isn't something you should aspire to. To few carbs will bring your metabolism to a crawl and make you a fat-storing machine, which is contra-indicated towards the goals of most folks. Carbs are essential, and that includes sugars, especially post workout.

    Alcohol, like anything else, is best in moderation.
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    Feb 12, 2009 10:06 PM GMT
    FrontRowIn saidMore than the caloric intake, alcohol turns into sugar in the body. Sugar can be VERY bad for you when taken in large amounts. Having too much sugar can lead to a host of problems from weight gain to depression.

    I try to keep my sugar inake low (including hidden sugars, i.e. potatoes, white rice) and my drinking down to once a week.

    Also be sure to read label on food you buy, stuff low in fat tends to be high in sugar.


    Since when....I don't know who told you that but is no metabolically possible way to reverse ferment alcohol into a sugar....

    In terms of alcohol being bad..re fitness

    It's been shown alcohol ramps up glucocorticoid production... The actual numbers are sketch but I've read in guys it's '3% more cortisol per unit of alcohol per week"

    Hence muscle wastage in chronic drinkers who are deriving a significant proportion of daily energy requirements from alcohol

    Coritisol has also ramps down fat mobilization from adiposites, messes with fat distribution and gives the non hepatic cause of a so Beer Belly
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    Feb 12, 2009 10:09 PM GMT
    :-) Yeah...sounds about right. LOL.