Incremental weight while lifting to avoid plateauing

  • Goodluckyman

    Posts: 104

    Jul 20, 2015 4:07 PM GMT
    Which is the best way to avoid plateauing and to obtain good results.

    Example if am doing leg press;

    A)3 reps of (140X10) and moving to 150 as you get comfortable OR

    B)3 reps of (130X10,140X10 and 150X10) and increasing to 140X10,150X10 and 160X10 as you get comfortable?

    Your thoughts on the two options. A friend of mine told me today that B is the best option while I have been doing A.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Jul 20, 2015 8:34 PM GMT
    I've also heard of a 5x5 routine. Tried that and found I could lift significantly more than I ever had before. But now I'm trying to consolidate the gains by dropping back to 3x10 ascending. I think the answer is just keep mixing things up. So long as your form is good.
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    Jul 21, 2015 7:46 AM GMT
    Goodluckyman saidWhich is the best way to avoid plateauing and to obtain good results.


    You're nowhere near plateauing, so don't worry about it. Just lift, eat, and sleep.

    Goodluckyman said
    Example if am doing leg press;

    A)3 reps of (140X10) and moving to 150 as you get comfortable OR

    B)3 reps of (130X10,140X10 and 150X10) and increasing to 140X10,150X10 and 160X10 as you get comfortable?

    Your thoughts on the two options. A friend of mine told me today that B is the best option while I have been doing A.


    Both are fine.

    Generally, do as many as you can. You want to reach failure: the point at which you can't do another rep. You want to reach failure in the 6-12 rep range. You can reach failure on all sets, or you can just reach failure on the last set. Both of these techniques can be beneficial to you.

    You can do 140x10 140x10 140x10

    or

    140x10 150x10 160x10

    or

    160x10 150x10 140x10

    On either one of these, you might not fail exactly on the 10th rep.

    It's possible on the first example that you do fail on the 10th rep each set, if your rests are long enough, and assuming that the 140 weight is challenging enough.

    On the 2nd example, you should only fail on the last set, in theory. An alternative that you can do would be something more like 140x12 150x10 160x8, in which case you'll fail on each set. If your rests are short, you may fail sooner on each subsequent set, which is fine too.

    On the 3rd example, you'll probably fail on the 10th rep each time, and as you get tired with each set, you reduce the weight with each set.

    All of these are fine. Especially at your stage where you're just starting out, you don't need to overthink it too much. Just vary it.
  • Goodluckyman

    Posts: 104

    Jul 21, 2015 10:39 AM GMT
    jjguy05 said
    Goodluckyman saidWhich is the best way to avoid plateauing and to obtain good results.


    You're nowhere near plateauing, so don't worry about it. Just lift, eat, and sleep.

    Goodluckyman said
    Example if am doing leg press;

    A)3 reps of (140X10) and moving to 150 as you get comfortable OR

    B)3 reps of (130X10,140X10 and 150X10) and increasing to 140X10,150X10 and 160X10 as you get comfortable?

    Your thoughts on the two options. A friend of mine told me today that B is the best option while I have been doing A.


    Both are fine.

    Generally, do as many as you can. You want to reach failure: the point at which you can't do another rep. You want to reach failure in the 6-12 rep range. You can reach failure on all sets, or you can just reach failure on the last set. Both of these techniques can be beneficial to you.

    You can do 140x10 140x10 140x10

    or

    140x10 150x10 160x10

    or

    160x10 150x10 140x10

    On either one of these, you might not fail exactly on the 10th rep.

    It's possible on the first example that you do fail on the 10th rep each set, if your rests are long enough, and assuming that the 140 weight is challenging enough.

    On the 2nd example, you should only fail on the last set, in theory. An alternative that you can do would be something more like 140x12 150x10 160x8, in which case you'll fail on each set. If your rests are short, you may fail sooner on each subsequent set, which is fine too.

    On the 3rd example, you'll probably fail on the 10th rep each time, and as you get tired with each set, you reduce the weight with each set.

    All of these are fine. Especially at your stage where you're just starting out, you don't need to overthink it too much. Just vary it.


    Thanks so much guys for the insights.

    That was very elaborate Jj.

    Kindly share a little more about plateauing since you say I should not worry about it.

    My view is that you can plateau any time from 3 weeks of training if you keep doing the same things and never changing the weights.

    Best
    GL
  • jjguy05

    Posts: 459

    Jul 23, 2015 7:20 PM GMT
    Goodluckyman,

    You won't plateau after 3 weeks of training. Three weeks of training is too early to see results. You can't plateau before you've even gotten results.

    Plateauing means that, you do the right thing for over a year, mostly likely a few years, and you've gotten results, but then you stop progressing.

    And when you plateau, make sure it's a real plateau. Not because you're doing something wrong (not eating enough, not eating right, not sleeping enough, not doing your lifts properly, etc).

    Additionally, don't think in terms of "changing weights". Think in terms of progressing as you get stronger. Progress to heavier weights and/or harder exercises. (For example, the wide grip pullup is mechanically harder than the narrow grip pullup).

    So, think in terms of progressing.

    The only think you should "change" from month to month or even week to week is the amount of sets and reps you do. So, if in July you're doing 3 sets of 10, then try 4 sets of 8 in August.

    My personal advice is not to vary your heavy basic lifts (squats, bench press, deadlift, etc) too much when you're just starting out (maybe once every 3 months). Feel free to vary the lighter isolation movements (bicep curls, skullcrushers, chest flies, etc) more often.
  • Goodluckyman

    Posts: 104

    Jul 23, 2015 11:36 PM GMT
    Much appreciated. Quite useful info. Anyway I had trained inconsistently some time back and stopped for so long due to work demands.

    I thought I would not find time and motivation to go back so its like I am starting all over again

    So grateful,
    Cheers!!