Dallas - Boomtown, USA

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 29, 2015 3:59 PM GMT
    North Texas is a reminder that there are bits of the rich world that are growing very fast (London and the San Francisco Bay area count among other examples).

    http://www.economist.com/news/business/21657825-you-do-not-have-travel-emerging-world-discover-emerging-markets-boomtown-usa
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14303

    Jul 30, 2015 11:10 PM GMT
    As far as I am concerned, Dallas along with its fast growing rival Fort Worth and that whole DFW Metroplex is a sprawling, featureless, soulless metropolis of all appearances and no substance. These two major cities and their suburbs are almost as bad as that horrendously overrated, unfriendly, sprawled out town located on I-35 and the Colorado River known as Austin. You can have Texas which is the Giant Tea Party State. There is no way that you could pressure me to move back there.
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    Jul 31, 2015 6:16 AM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidAs far as I am concerned, Dallas along with its fast growing rival Fort Worth and that whole DFW Metroplex is a sprawling, featureless, soulless metropolis of all appearances and no substance.


    The point remains. As the Economist states, they are doing well economically. It's up to you where you decide to live. You could try North Dakota perhaps.

    North Dakota has the lowest unemployment rate in the nation. You have to be ok with -20 degree weather and hard work though. Sorry, North Dakota does not have a "metroplex".



  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14303

    Aug 01, 2015 12:51 AM GMT
    desertmuscl said
    roadbikeRob saidAs far as I am concerned, Dallas along with its fast growing rival Fort Worth and that whole DFW Metroplex is a sprawling, featureless, soulless metropolis of all appearances and no substance.


    The point remains. As the Economist states, they are doing well economically. It's up to you where you decide to live. You could try North Dakota perhaps.

    North Dakota has the lowest unemployment rate in the nation. You have to be ok with -20 degree weather and hard work though. Sorry, North Dakota does not have a "metroplex".



    Why does a state have to possess big cities and sprawling suburbs to be considered interesting or beautifulicon_question.gif Look at Vermont, a very beautiful and historic mountain state with a lot to offer. It's largest city, Burlington has a central city population of only 43,000. The second largest city, Rutland has a central city population of 21,000. Vermont is a very progressive, well educated state with a strong streak of independence, liberalism, and libertarianism all mixed together. In terms of athletic activities, Vermont is a paradise for runners, cyclists, and winter sports enthusiasts.

    Another scenic interesting state is Maine with its gorgeous, rock ribbed coastline, historic lighthouses, forested mountains, and charming small towns. It's largest city, Portland has a central city population of 62,000 and it is one of the most historic and picturesque cities in the US. It is a little over 200 years older than its younger, bigger, brasher namesake in Oregon. Like Vermont, Maine defies the typical, religious, impoverished image of most predominately rural and small town states. It is well educated and quite prosperous and very inclusive despite being overwhelmingly white in population.

    Out west, there is Wyoming, a gorgeous western frontier state of grassy high plains, dense evergreen forests, jagged, snow capped mountains, and small, historic western towns. It has the smallest population of all the fifty states and its largest city is its state capital, Cheyenne which has a central city population of around 55,000. Unlike Maine and Vermont, Wyoming is much more conservative and there are large rural pockets of intolerance but that doesn't mean that there not interesting places to see and fun things to do. Don't just judge a rural state by only its politics.

    Now it is time to head up US Route 285 into Montana, big sky country. A beautiful, western frontier state of rolling high plains, rugged snow capped mountains, thick evergreen forests dotted with many rustic, small towns. It's largest city, Billings is pretty large with a central city population of well over 100,000 which has some Montanans concerned that the big city and the sprawling suburbs are finally reaching their western, rural paradise of deep blue skies. But Montana is still overwhelmingly rural and like its neighbor to the south, it is also quite conservative. Just because it is a red, republican state doesn't mean that Montana is a horrible, hostile, or worthless place. Don't judge Montana just by how it votes in Presidential elections. There is a lot to see and do and the people are quite friendly. I always wanted to visit Missoula which is Montana's second largest city with a central city population approaching 60,000.'It is a university dominated city supposedly nestled in a scenic valley in the majestic Rockies. I have been told that Missoula and a large part of the rest of Montana is a runners and cyclists paradise.