Brazil, a Very Rich Country, is Still Very 3rd World in the Sanitation Department

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    Jul 31, 2015 8:49 PM GMT
    Probably no Olympic boaters on here - but those guys will have to compete in literal sewage in Rio. (probably littoral as well).

    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/jul/30/athletes-at-rio-olympics-to-compete-in-basically-raw-sewage-study-reveals
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    Jul 31, 2015 9:05 PM GMT
    http://cyberwarzone.com/street-kids-murdered-clean-brazil-ahead-world-cup/

    http://www.childrenofbahia.com/childpoverty.htm

    It's a shame, isn't it?

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    A man giving his shoes to a homeless girl.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Aug 01, 2015 6:39 PM GMT
    Brazil, although prosperous, is a primitive country with a ghastly human rights record.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Aug 01, 2015 7:19 PM GMT
    Here is an article about slavery in Brazil; it still exists:

    http://projects.aljazeera.com/2015/07/slavery-brazil/slaves-fight-back.html

    I question the appropriateness of having the Olympics in such a country.
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    Aug 01, 2015 7:47 PM GMT
    In one word corruption, politicians, public servants, and police not to mention with its crime. The sad thing is that it has the potential to be a jewel of progress in South America from social policies helping the poor and improving its infrastructure.

    With recent discoveries of light crude oil close to its shores which they indicated is one of the biggest reserves in the world, Brazil could become a big exporter of light crude oil to the world by Petrobas its state own gas company. The problem I see more corruption and money from this find, rather than politicians and public servants helping the people. Its a real shame.
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    Aug 01, 2015 9:33 PM GMT
    FRE0 saidHere is an article about slavery in Brazil; it still exists:

    http://projects.aljazeera.com/2015/07/slavery-brazil/slaves-fight-back.html

    I question the appropriateness of having the Olympics in such a country.


    Yes, because US has a very clean human rights record, especially in the racial violence department.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Aug 01, 2015 11:44 PM GMT
    bachian said
    FRE0 saidHere is an article about slavery in Brazil; it still exists:

    http://projects.aljazeera.com/2015/07/slavery-brazil/slaves-fight-back.html

    I question the appropriateness of having the Olympics in such a country.


    Yes, because US has a very clean human rights record, especially in the racial violence department.


    Apparently you think that because every person and country is imperfect, there should be no criticism. If that were they case, how could progress occur?
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14351

    Aug 02, 2015 12:36 AM GMT
    uombroca saidIn one word corruption, politicians, public servants, and police not to mention with its crime. The sad thing is that it has the potential to be a jewel of progress in South America from social policies helping the poor and improving its infrastructure.

    With recent discoveries of light crude oil close to its shores which they indicated is one of the biggest reserves in the world, Brazil could become a big exporter of light crude oil to the world by Petrobas its state own gas company. The problem I see more corruption and money from this find, rather than politicians and public servants helping the people. Its a real shame.
    Petrobas needs to be made a publicly traded, investor owned company, period. The government has no damn business owning oil and mineral companies, utilities or anything else that could be better and more effectively managed by the private sector. Brazil's national government needs to have its power restricted and its responsibilities limited to the things that governments on all levels traditionally do like providing safe water, police protection, infrastructure, education, environmental protection, etc. Owning corporate businesses is not a primary function of government whether it is national, state or regional, and local. This is why Brazil continues to be dogged by these grave problems and why corruption is so rampant in the country. Brazil has tremendous potential to be a first rate, modern country like the U.S. and Australia but it's ultra leftist micro management and its brutal, petty politics continue to hold Brazil back in time. A horribly sad and unacceptable situation.icon_sad.gif
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    Aug 02, 2015 5:15 AM GMT
    ^

    Totally agree.
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    Aug 02, 2015 5:33 AM GMT
    FRE0 saidApparently you think that because every person and country is imperfect, there should be no criticism. If that were they case, how could progress occur?


    I agree with the criticism, what I don't agree is that a blotched history is a sufficient argument against these events. US has too a ghastly track record of human rights, but unlike Brazil, US has a solid democracy and solid institutions. You only have to look at US a century ago to see how you all went through similar problems of corruption. The key difference is US institutions and how they curbed this problem by creating a culture of respect for the law.

    Brazil will get there, it just needs more time to mature as a democracy.
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    Aug 02, 2015 7:03 AM GMT
    #firstworldproblems icon_razz.gif
  • WrestlerBoy

    Posts: 1903

    Aug 02, 2015 8:47 AM GMT
    FRE0 said
    bachian said
    FRE0 saidHere is an article about slavery in Brazil; it still exists:

    http://projects.aljazeera.com/2015/07/slavery-brazil/slaves-fight-back.html

    I question the appropriateness of having the Olympics in such a country.


    Yes, because US has a very clean human rights record, especially in the racial violence department.


    Apparently you think that because every person and country is imperfect, there should be no criticism. If that were they case, how could progress occur?


    And here's an article about slavery currently in the United States. We've changed the name to "Human Trafficking", these days, but it's slavery.

    http://www.polarisproject.org/human-trafficking/overview

    OK, so we know Brazil's "excuses", from rampant "corruption" at every level of society. What might be ours? As I never tire of saying, it amazes me how many of my fellow countrymen seem to live in some place called the United States of Disneyland... which has nothing to do with how the United States of America actually "is".
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14351

    Aug 06, 2015 12:51 AM GMT
    bachian said
    FRE0 saidApparently you think that because every person and country is imperfect, there should be no criticism. If that were they case, how could progress occur?


    I agree with the criticism, what I don't agree is that a blotched history is a sufficient argument against these events. US has too a ghastly track record of human rights, but unlike Brazil, US has a solid democracy and solid institutions. You only have to look at US a century ago to see how you all went through similar problems of corruption. The key difference is US institutions and how they curbed this problem by creating a culture of respect for the law.

    Brazil will get there, it just needs more time to mature as a democracy.
    The Brazilian national government can take the first major, positive step by putting Petrobas up for sale and let the private sector purchase this oil and gas monopoly and turn it into an investor owned, publicly traded corporation that can compete in the global marketplace which could help attract more lucrative private investment to Brazil and expand the country's tax base. This could also help create more jobs and lift more Brazilian nationals out of poverty. But the lawmakers in Brasilia remain the serious problem because they are obsessed with total control of everything in the country thinking that it is in the best interests of the Brazilian people when the total opposite is true.
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    Aug 06, 2015 3:56 PM GMT
    What did you expect from a country governed by a commie terrorist?

    Brazilians saw the Venezuelan economic catastrophe unfold from the very front row and still voted for the Castro puppet "Worker's Party" four times. I have no sympathy. Let them learn the hard way what happens when you play fast and loose with your vote.

    This is their president aged 23 under trial after going on a bank robbery spree, kidnapping the US ambassador and detonating a few bombs here and there. Notice how the judges/prosecutors are covering their faces because the group she belonged to was known for revenge killings. They basically have an ISIS lunatic in charge of their country icon_lol.gif

    NHs4ZtZ.png
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4864

    Aug 06, 2015 7:12 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    bachian said
    FRE0 saidApparently you think that because every person and country is imperfect, there should be no criticism. If that were they case, how could progress occur?


    I agree with the criticism, what I don't agree is that a blotched history is a sufficient argument against these events. US has too a ghastly track record of human rights, but unlike Brazil, US has a solid democracy and solid institutions. You only have to look at US a century ago to see how you all went through similar problems of corruption. The key difference is US institutions and how they curbed this problem by creating a culture of respect for the law.

    Brazil will get there, it just needs more time to mature as a democracy.
    The Brazilian national government can take the first major, positive step by putting Petrobas up for sale and let the private sector purchase this oil and gas monopoly and turn it into an investor owned, publicly traded corporation that can compete in the global marketplace which could help attract more lucrative private investment to Brazil and expand the country's tax base. This could also help create more jobs and lift more Brazilian nationals out of poverty. But the lawmakers in Brasilia remain the serious problem because they are obsessed with total control of everything in the country thinking that it is in the best interests of the Brazilian people when the total opposite is true.


    I agree that it is best for such entities to be owned by the private sector. On the other hand, I do not support laissez faire. Unrestrained capitalism results in acceptable abuses. There have to be reasonable controls.
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    Aug 19, 2015 10:22 PM GMT
    pouncer saidAaron> Venezuelan economic catastrophe

    Never a good sign when Aaron sees them natives getting restless.

    I'm sure you'd prefer Venezuela pre-Chávez, with oil reserves squandered, 1 in 3 Venezuelans living on less than $2 a day, and per capita income roughly where it was in the early 1960s. As opposed to Venezuela post-Chávez, with unemployment more than halved, poverty cut by more than 20%, severe poverty cut by over 50%, and GDP per capita more than doubled. For the first time in its history, most (adult) Venezuelans now vote, and eat three meals a day. What's not to hate eh?

    Until recently, the US had more people with no health insurance than there are people in (almost fully insured) Venezuela. Thanks to "Obamacare" their fortunes are slightly less bleak today, but continue to hang on a dime.


    Everything is so rosy when you believe the statistics provided by the Venezuelan commie government. Reminds me of how much of a wonderful place Cuba is based on statistics despite their own government having to impose strict controls on travel documents otherwise they would be faced with an exodus.

    This is what the reality in Venezuela is like, soviet style:

    The milk line:



    Chavez' daughter really seems to love the dollars despite her daddy's "Revolucion Bolivariana" imposing tight regulations on forex.

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    Venezuelans literally fighting for a piece of meat. A lot of desperation for a population that allegedly eats "3 meals a day" don't you think?


    Thanks to the socialist prosperity brought upon them by Chavez and Maduro, Venezuelans now get to choose between mayo and oil for their daily meal.*

    *only until stocks last

    This fascist CIA agent is clearly trying to undermine el socialismo bolivariano. She is wrong, government statistics are right.


    And thank God Venezuelans are now "fully insured" under Maduro. The American health system is so cruel our patients don't even get to try pet medication.

    https://news.yahoo.com/venezuela-patients-resort-pet-medications-051544596.html