LETS SAVE THE BEES!

  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1114

    Aug 01, 2015 1:22 PM GMT
    I am planting more of these flowers "Echinacea" in my property. The bees seem to love them! In the past several years they seem to have disappeared, but I've noticed this year a couple of them visiting my own backyard after I planted these Cone flowers last year! I just love this little busy workers. They are not only beneficial for the farmers, but also seem to bring a lot of joy and happiness to my garden! sure they may sting, but if you respect their space, they usually leave you alone! so please do your part in bringing back this wonder of nature!


    10353114_900604799955013_585029459252542
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    Aug 01, 2015 1:49 PM GMT
    Yes, lot of joy and happiness dying from anaphylaxis...
    the joys

    That looks like a bumble bee btw

    I used to love flowers, when I was little I used to pick them in the near fields up and give to my mom icon_lol.gif
  • Amira

    Posts: 327

    Aug 01, 2015 2:21 PM GMT
    bonaparts saidYes, lot of joy and happiness dying from anaphylaxis...
    the joys

    That looks like a bumble bee btw

    I used to love flowers, when I was little I used to pick them in the near fields up and give to my mom icon_lol.gif


    Yes definitely a bumblebee. They need flowers such as cone flowers to easily obtain pollen.

    I do my best to plant for nature but the only plant I have that has been able to handle Florida heat is my basil and recently my dill flowered then died icon_sad.gif

  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Aug 01, 2015 2:54 PM GMT
    I'm only a old horticulturist who has dealt with pollenation and seed production for forty years... don't let my opinions on the extinction of honey bees diminish your angst over this ridiculous drama.

    Fuck European honey bees... They should die miserable painful deaths.

    In the United States and the Americas in general, honey bees are nothing but an invasive species from Europe that have pushed over a dozen native American species of mostly stingless bees to the furthest margins of survival for the past 400 years.

    During their early tenure in North America, European honey bees spread out and overtook the traditional nesting cavities of Carolina Parakeets that dominated the entire eastern half of North America from the Great Lakes to Texas and Florida and in no small way contributed to their extinction.

    The only downside to the disappearance of European honey bees is it will mean honey will become pricey.

    If you want bees consider making nesting habitats for native species. Build pergolas of untreated, unpainted lumber or fallen tree limbs for all three species of carpenter bees in North America. Go to your craft store and buy natural modeling clay to heap up in mounds in shallow pans filled with water for those small shiny metallic bees who depend on it to build their nests. Stop using insecticides on ornamental annual bedding plants.

    For what European honey bees have done to the environment if North America they ought to be listed above Hitler, Stalin and Mao for the mass murder of one of the most beautiful birds that has ever existed.

    cp_1.jpg

    If you want to purchase dormant colonies of native American bees, contact me or any of several larger cultivators on the internet who specialize in reintroducing them.
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    Aug 01, 2015 3:02 PM GMT
    bobbobbob saidSNIP


    Everything he said. I see so much tripe about honeybees when our own native pollinators are so much more effective and valuable to our local ecosystems.

    I use strictly native plants in my garden. Some really good ones are foxglove beardtongues, clethra, and especially anise hyssop. My garden turns into a Roman food orgy once the hyssop blooms.
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Aug 01, 2015 3:09 PM GMT
    Caelus said
    bobbobbob saidSNIP


    Everything he said. I see so much tripe about honeybees when our own native pollinators are so much more effective and valuable to our local ecosystems.

    I use strictly native plants in my garden. Some really good ones are foxglove beardtongues, clethra, and especially anise hyssop. My garden turns into a Roman food orgy once the hyssop blooms.


    AND they're 100000000000 times more beautiful and fun once you get past the idea of all bees possessing venomous stings.

    I should add that I keep a small tank of liquid oxygen so I can exterminate any invasive European bees and South American fire ants any time I encounter them.
  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1114

    Aug 01, 2015 6:17 PM GMT
    bobbobbob saidI'm only a old horticulturist who has dealt with pollenation and seed production for forty years... don't let my opinions on the extinction of honey bees diminish your angst over this ridiculous drama.

    Fuck European honey bees... They should die miserable painful deaths.

    In the United States and the Americas in general, honey bees are nothing but an invasive species from Europe that have pushed over a dozen native American species of mostly stingless bees to the furthest margins of survival for the past 400 years.

    During their early tenure in North America, European honey bees spread out and overtook the traditional nesting cavities of Carolina Parakeets that dominated the entire eastern half of North America from the Great Lakes to Texas and Florida and in no small way contributed to their extinction.

    The only downside to the disappearance of European honey bees is it will mean honey will become pricey.

    If you want bees consider making nesting habitats for native species. Build pergolas of untreated, unpainted lumber or fallen tree limbs for all three species of carpenter bees in North America. Go to your craft store and buy natural modeling clay to heap up in mounds in shallow pans filled with water for those small shiny metallic bees who depend on it to build their nests. Stop using insecticides on ornamental annual bedding plants.

    For what European honey bees have done to the environment if North America they ought to be listed above Hitler, Stalin and Mao for the mass murder of one of the most beautiful birds that has ever existed.

    cp_1.jpg

    If you want to purchase dormant colonies of native American bees, contact me or any of several larger cultivators on the internet who specialize in reintroducing them.


    Thank you Bob! wonderful post full of great information! I am perfectly aware of the honeybees being an invasive species here in North America, so yes I agree with you one hundred percent! again thank you so much for the info, greatly appreciated!

    I was just thinking what I can do to help bring back the American bees to my area! any suggestions will be greatly appreciated! thank again!
  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1114

    Aug 01, 2015 6:26 PM GMT
    Caelus said
    bobbobbob saidSNIP


    Everything he said. I see so much tripe about honeybees when our own native pollinators are so much more effective and valuable to our local ecosystems.

    I use strictly native plants in my garden. Some really good ones are foxglove beardtongues, clethra, and especially anise hyssop. My garden turns into a Roman food orgy once the hyssop blooms.


    I have great success with the Echinacia aka Cone flowers! not only are they a Native species to North America, but they are very showy and sturdy plants! they bloom all summer long in my area, if I keep pinching the dead flowers back, of course!
  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1114

    Aug 01, 2015 6:31 PM GMT
    Bee-or-Not-a-Bee.jpg
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    Aug 01, 2015 6:50 PM GMT
    Doesn't Echinacea prevent colds? Do you have to eat the flowers?
  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1114

    Aug 01, 2015 7:16 PM GMT
    DefensiveEnd saidDoesn't Echinacea prevent colds? Do you have to eat the flowers?


    The leaves, stems, flower, and roots are used to make supplements, liquid extracts, and teas. But a word of caution:you may have a reaction if you are allergic to ragweed, chrysanthemums, and marigolds!? consult with your doctor before taking Echinacia to prevent a cold!
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Aug 01, 2015 7:21 PM GMT
    LEANDRO_NJ said
    Caelus said
    bobbobbob saidSNIP


    Everything he said. I see so much tripe about honeybees when our own native pollinators are so much more effective and valuable to our local ecosystems.

    I use strictly native plants in my garden. Some really good ones are foxglove beardtongues, clethra, and especially anise hyssop. My garden turns into a Roman food orgy once the hyssop blooms.


    I have great success with the Echinacia aka Cone flowers! not only are they a Native species to North America, but they are very showy and sturdy plants! they bloom all summer long in my area, if I keep pinching the dead flowers of course!


    You cannot go wrong with Echinacea (correct spelling) Pest free, drought resistant, and one of the showiest perennials of all.

    When I began my nursery in 1978 there was no one growing them so I had the market all to myself. Echinaceas and a few other things I introduced those first years helped shape the business i have today.

    If you have room for a large showy dual purpose native perennial think about Helianthus tuberosus - a type of sunflower,
    sunchokes.jpg
    They start blooming late summer/early fall and are perfect cut flowers with long stems when many plants are ready to go dormant.

    I cultivate a wide variety of native plants from trees, palms, ferns, perennials annuals, grasses...

    Why do I call them dual purpose? The large tuberous roots (harvested from late fall to spring - or summer if they spread too much for you) can be eaten raw or any way you use potatoes and they're delicious. They don't store for long in the fridge or in house conditions so harvest them as needed. They make enormous amounts of tubers each year. They are also better for people with diabetes than potatoes so it has behooved me to ingratiate myself to doctors while educating them about Helianthus tuberosus (common name Jerusalem artichoke or sunchokes) You can get them started from tubers from the produce section of most organic grocers. If they don't have them, ask for them. The only "potatoes" I've bought in years are chips or tater tots.

    I'm in my 5th year of hybridizing these native annual flowers....
    Clitoria+flower+RK+.jpg
    You can see why they deserve the botanical name Clitoria. LOL. We call them pigeon wings instead of pussy flowers to be polite. In the wild they're puny weak climbing small vines. I'm working on that.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2015 7:26 PM GMT
    bobbobbob saidI'm only a old horticulturist who has dealt with pollenation and seed production for forty years... don't let my opinions on the extinction of honey bees diminish your angst over this ridiculous drama.

    Fuck European honey bees... They should die miserable painful deaths.

    In the United States and the Americas in general, honey bees are nothing but an invasive species from Europe that have pushed over a dozen native American species of mostly stingless bees to the furthest margins of survival for the past 400 years.

    .



    Ho dare you say something like that about honey bees
    well maybe you should try making love with their hive and you will have the same faith as one swedish guy who died of having sex with hornets nest
    According to your logic all immigrants should die in miserable death icon_rolleyes.gif
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Aug 01, 2015 8:16 PM GMT


    bonaparts said
    bobbobbob saidI'm only a old horticulturist who has dealt with pollenation and seed production for forty years... don't let my opinions on the extinction of honey bees diminish your angst over this ridiculous drama.

    Fuck European honey bees... They should die miserable painful deaths.

    In the United States and the Americas in general, honey bees are nothing but an invasive species from Europe that have pushed over a dozen native American species of mostly stingless bees to the furthest margins of survival for the past 400 years.

    .



    Ho dare you say something like that about honey bees
    well maybe you should try making love with their hive and you will have the same faith as one swedish guy who died of having sex with hornets nest
    According to your logic all immigrants should die in miserable death icon_rolleyes.gif


    Get over yourself before a bus does it for you.


    But now that you brought it up... Starlings were brought over from England by a jackass who thought all the birds mentioned by Shakespeare needed to be flying in Central Park...

    And why the hell do I have Canada Geese year round in my pond in Florida?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2015 8:21 PM GMT
    bobbobbob said
    bonaparts said
    bobbobbob saidI'm only a old horticulturist who has dealt with pollenation and seed production for forty years... don't let my opinions on the extinction of honey bees diminish your angst over this ridiculous drama.

    Fuck European honey bees... They should die miserable painful deaths.

    In the United States and the Americas in general, honey bees are nothing but an invasive species from Europe that have pushed over a dozen native American species of mostly stingless bees to the furthest margins of survival for the past 400 years.

    .



    Ho dare you say something like that about honey bees
    well maybe you should try making love with their hive and you will have the same faith as one swedish guy who died of having sex with hornets nest
    According to your logic all immigrants should die in miserable death icon_rolleyes.gif


    Get over yourself before a bus does it for you.


    But now that you brought it up... Starlings were brought over from England by a jackass who thought all the birds mentioned by Shakespeare needed to be flying in Central Park...

    And why the hell do I have Canada Geese year round in my pond in Florida?


    well maybe you should move back to England or wherever your ancestors came from and you will have one less reason to whine, hypocrite
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2015 8:44 PM GMT
    bonaparts said
    well maybe you should move back to England or wherever your ancestors came from and you will have one less reason to whine, hypocrite


    8712847.jpg

    ... anyway, this site http://pollinator.org/guides.htm has some good info depending on your geographic location!
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Aug 02, 2015 3:08 AM GMT
    Leandro - the first thing to do to support native bees is to plant native plants they are specialized to pollenate or better at pollenating that honey bees.

    I'll find the list of those and post it.

    Here's a good 30 something page illustrated book on PDF for you to download about them.
    [url]www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE.../stelprdb5306468.pdf‎[/url]


    The next thing is to find out about the dominant species of native bees in your area... All total in North America there are thousands. You need to know so you will not automatically think some of them are wasps and swat them.

    And you won't believe how varied (and crazy) their nesting habits are. I have some who nest in straight segments of narrow copper tubing stacked neatly in large plastic oatmeal boxes. Some who drill in all the conifer lumber I nail together, some prefer hardwood, some like clay soils. LOL... I have an old redwood picnic table that's so full of carpenter bees that it buzzes so loud you can hear it from 15 feet away.

    Do a search for Native Bee habitats for more ideas and info.
    plants.usda.gov/...Native_Bee_Habitat_for_Crop_Pollination.pdf

    Here's another great link.
    http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/gardening-techniques/how-to-attract-native-bees-zm0z13aszkin.aspx

    And don't forget about hummingbirds!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 02, 2015 3:21 AM GMT
    LEANDRO_NJ said
    bobbobbob said

    Thank you Bob! wonderful post full of great information! I am perfectly aware of the honeybees being an invasive species here in North America, so yes I agree with you one hundred percent! again thank you so much for the info, greatly appreciated!

    I was just thinking what I can do to help bring back the American bees to my area! any suggestions will be greatly appreciated! thank again!


    The best way to support native bees is maintain a plot of completely diversifed flowers - mostly native to your area, so that there is something blooming from spring through fall. Native bees (in whatever part of the US) depend on a succession (and variety) of flowers throughout the growing season - whenever they are not hibernating.
  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1114

    Aug 02, 2015 3:49 AM GMT
    Thank you guys for all the wonderful suggestions! my sister-in-law adds 2 sq. ft a year of native flowering perennials on her property; and every year the native bees population keeps coming back! I started doing the same thing since last year, and as such have noticed that my three fruit trees are loaded with fruits. I can't wait til the fall to harvest them!!
  • LEANDRO_NJ

    Posts: 1114

    Aug 02, 2015 3:51 AM GMT
    bobbobbob saidLeandro - the first thing to do to support native bees is to plant native plants they are specialized to pollenate or better at pollenating that honey bees.

    I'll find the list of those and post it.

    Here's a good 30 something page illustrated book on PDF for you to download about them.
    [url]www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE.../stelprdb5306468.pdf‎[/url]


    The next thing is to find out about the dominant species of native bees in your area... All total in North America there are thousands. You need to know so you will not automatically think some of them are wasps and swat them.

    And you won't believe how varied (and crazy) their nesting habits are. I have some who nest in straight segments of narrow copper tubing stacked neatly in large plastic oatmeal boxes. Some who drill in all the conifer lumber I nail together, some prefer hardwood, some like clay soils. LOL... I have an old redwood picnic table that's so full of carpenter bees that it buzzes so loud you can hear it from 15 feet away.

    Do a search for Native Bee habitats for more ideas and info.
    plants.usda.gov/...Native_Bee_Habitat_for_Crop_Pollination.pdf

    Here's another great link.
    http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/gardening-techniques/how-to-attract-native-bees-zm0z13aszkin.aspx

    And don't forget about hummingbirds!


    Bob you gave me a lot of great ideas for housing the bees, thanks!!
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14295

    Aug 03, 2015 1:41 PM GMT
    bobbobbob said

    bonaparts said
    bobbobbob saidI'm only a old horticulturist who has dealt with pollenation and seed production for forty years... don't let my opinions on the extinction of honey bees diminish your angst over this ridiculous drama.

    Fuck European honey bees... They should die miserable painful deaths.

    In the United States and the Americas in general, honey bees are nothing but an invasive species from Europe that have pushed over a dozen native American species of mostly stingless bees to the furthest margins of survival for the past 400 years.

    .



    Ho dare you say something like that about honey bees
    well maybe you should try making love with their hive and you will have the same faith as one swedish guy who died of having sex with hornets nest
    According to your logic all immigrants should die in miserable death icon_rolleyes.gif


    Get over yourself before a bus does it for you.


    But now that you brought it up... Starlings were brought over from England by a jackass who thought all the birds mentioned by Shakespeare needed to be flying in Central Park...

    And why the hell do I have Canada Geese year round in my pond in Florida?
    Now there is a useless, invasive nuisance, the Canada Geese. Those filthy, vicious birds populate like wildfire and there is no natural predator to curb their population growth. I much rather have European honey bees which produce something of nutritional value than these filthy, ugly birds that just eat grass and shit all over the place. Canada Geese are totally repugnant.