Think this CEO is smoking pot?? lol

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 01, 2015 9:37 PM GMT
    Seattle CEO who set firm's minimum wage to $70G says he has hit hard times

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/08/01/seattle-ceo-who-set-firm-minimum-wage-to-70g-rents-house-to-make-ends-meet/

    Sorry, I like the https://squareup.com/ processing better. Why? I get better rates!!!
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    Aug 01, 2015 10:14 PM GMT
    Well, pot IS legal there. icon_wink.gif
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Aug 01, 2015 10:18 PM GMT

    I feel sorry for the guy.
    Now he's broke.
    he has no one he can blame for his own failure.
    And he's has finally come face to face with the reality he's so Ducking Fumb he's been using his fingers to determine if he needs to take a shit.

    Poor guy.

    On the bright side, I bet he's developed a shitty perspective on socialism.

    LOL.
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    Aug 01, 2015 10:22 PM GMT
    bobbobbob said
    I feel sorry for the guy.
    Now he's broke.
    he has no one he can blame for his own failure.
    And he's has finally come face to face with the reality he's so Ducking Fumb he's been using his fingers to determine if he needs to take a shit.

    Poor guy.

    On the bright side, I bet he's developed a shitty perspective on socialism.

    LOL.


    YUP!!

    I would never pay out right equal pay. It's counter productive....
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Aug 01, 2015 10:35 PM GMT


    As an employer for 37 years I've found out I can accomplish many things via wages. The top two are......

    1. Cull out workers whose performance amounts to "showing up to draw a check."

    2. When good employees transform into excllent ones I price them out of their job description to make it impossible for them to find a comparable job at higher wages. I'm not at all fond of training excellent employees for my competition. Once they reach that tier they're lifers and have trouble retiring.

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    Aug 03, 2015 12:22 AM GMT
    bobbobbob saidAs an employer for 37 years I've found out I can accomplish many things via wages. The top two are......

    1. Cull out workers whose performance amounts to "showing up to draw a check."

    2. When good employees transform into excllent ones I price them out of their job description to make it impossible for them to find a comparable job at higher wages. I'm not at all fond of training excellent employees for my competition. Once they reach that tier they're lifers and have trouble retiring.



    I'm starting a business right now and I just made my first hire. I'll remember this as things move forward. Thank you.
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Aug 03, 2015 1:44 AM GMT


    Kerry_90 said
    bobbobbob saidAs an employer for 37 years I've found out I can accomplish many things via wages. The top two are......

    1. Cull out workers whose performance amounts to "showing up to draw a check."

    2. When good employees transform into excllent ones I price them out of their job description to make it impossible for them to find a comparable job at higher wages. I'm not at all fond of training excellent employees for my competition. Once they reach that tier they're lifers and have trouble retiring.



    I'm starting a business right now and I just made my first hire. I'll remember this as things move forward. Thank you.


    TRUST ME... when you find excellent employees you don't want to lose take the first step and make them feel appreciated and keep appreciating them... Give them authority, enable them to make decisions for you and they become family.

    I'm in the process of retiring... that means for the past five years I've only been showing up less and less to see how great things are going, dish out compliments, sit in the office on the computer playing cards waiting in case anyone needs to ask a question... I didn't go in yesterday (Saturday) even though we were running a big sale. I went in this morning and found a note on my desk from a woman who's been in sales for over 20 years...


    "Bob, We had a problem Saturday. A customer and her boyfriend came in and said "Jim" (an employee of 5 months) had copied her home phone number off her check and made obscene phone calls from here to her house. Nothing for you to worry about. We took care of it. Just remember to mail Jim his final paycheck Thursday.

    I hope you had a great weekend! Hope to see you Monday."

    I feel like framing that note, giving some spare cash to all involved in solving that problem without bothering me and hugging everyone of them.

    [color=blue]BTW... since 2009 when the economy tanked, and I was edging up on trying to retire I've been drawing a 'salary' of $400 per quarter just to make sure none of my extended family of employees would be worrying about lay offs. Now I'm out of the picture most of the time all of them have stepped up to do things far above their job descriptions and they've been appreciated for it on a regular basis.
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    Aug 03, 2015 2:29 AM GMT
    bobbobbob said

    Kerry_90 said
    bobbobbob saidAs an employer for 37 years I've found out I can accomplish many things via wages. The top two are......

    1. Cull out workers whose performance amounts to "showing up to draw a check."

    2. When good employees transform into excllent ones I price them out of their job description to make it impossible for them to find a comparable job at higher wages. I'm not at all fond of training excellent employees for my competition. Once they reach that tier they're lifers and have trouble retiring.



    I'm starting a business right now and I just made my first hire. I'll remember this as things move forward. Thank you.


    TRUST ME... when you find excellent employees you don't want to lose take the first step and make them feel appreciated and keep appreciating them... Give them authority, enable them to make decisions for you and they become family.

    I'm in the process of retiring... that means for the past five years I've only been showing up less and less to see how great things are going, dish out compliments, sit in the office on the computer playing cards waiting in case anyone needs to ask a question... I didn't go in yesterday (Saturday) even though we were running a big sale. I went in this morning and found a note on my desk from a woman who's been in sales for over 20 years...


    "Bob, We had a problem Saturday. A customer and her boyfriend came in and said "Jim" (an employee of 5 months) had copied her home phone number off her check and made obscene phone calls from here to her house. Nothing for you to worry about. We took care of it. Just remember to mail Jim his final paycheck Thursday.

    I hope you had a great weekend! Hope to see you Monday."

    I feel like framing that note, giving some spare cash to all involved in solving that problem without bothering me and hugging everyone of them.

    [color=blue]BTW... since 2009 when the economy tanked, and I was edging up on trying to retire I've been drawing a 'salary' of $400 per quarter just to make sure none of my extended family of employees would be worrying about lay offs. Now I'm out of the picture most of the time all of them have stepped up to do things far above their job descriptions and they've been appreciated for it on a regular basis.


    That's fantastic! I really want to foster an environment like that where employees are able to take actions like that one on their own and just give me updates. Right now I'm primarily what they call a solo-preneur, but with this first hire I'm beginning to expand. It's exciting, terrifying, exhilarating, nerve racking, freeing, and stressful all at once, but I wouldn't want to do anything else.
  • bobbobbob

    Posts: 2812

    Aug 03, 2015 3:03 AM GMT


    Kerry_90 said

    That's fantastic! I really want to foster an environment like that where employees are able to take actions like that one on their own and just give me updates. Right now I'm primarily what they call a solo-preneur, but with this first hire I'm beginning to expand. It's exciting, terrifying, exhilarating, nerve racking, freeing, and stressful all at once, but I wouldn't want to do anything else.


    some more meaty advice for you.

    Cultivate relationships with business owners who are older wiser than you are and throw yourself to their mercy for advice and most of all constructive criticism. AND never let your instinct to follow your own ideas over theirs.

    And... if you can find a way to step out of the dog-eat-dog competitive markets, do so. For me in the nursery business that was pretty easy. I got lists from wholesalers of what they were growing for the next season (items that put me in direct competition with area nurseries) I went through seed catalogs with a magic marker crossing out everything that the wholesalers were growing ... and I started growing the things they weren't.

    What this did was give me products that had no direct competition on the retail level. Therefore I could charge "what the market would pay" for them. The higher mark ups I made on the crops I was producing allowed me drop prices on everything I bought from wholesalers so I could draw in customers in droves who quickly became buyers of the "next new things" I was constantly introducing each season.

    Sure there were some failures in that process but the successes far outweighed them.

    And never ever forget that the best advertising dollars you can spend is on making sure satisfied customers are running their mouths at every opportunity.

    And find an accountant/bookkeper who's an organizational nazi.
  • AttisXVI

    Posts: 293

    Aug 03, 2015 3:41 AM GMT
    My current boss is one of those rare people who hires people with the vision that they have potential to be much more than they are at the time. He sees the potential in others to achieve above and beyond what they think they can, and pushes them toward it. He is blunt, speaks his mind, and is never without advice. He told me that in the next few years he sees me getting a job offer for something much bigger and better than he can offer me, and when the time comes he will have given me the tools to be successful wherever I go.
    When your boss tells you something like that, it doesn't just motivate; it empowers. I remember a time where I couldn't see myself even being alive by age 30. Now I can see myself retired, floating on a yacht.

    It's funny how people can walk into your life, lift you up, and dust you off like that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 03, 2015 10:03 PM GMT
    bobbobbob said

    Kerry_90 said

    That's fantastic! I really want to foster an environment like that where employees are able to take actions like that one on their own and just give me updates. Right now I'm primarily what they call a solo-preneur, but with this first hire I'm beginning to expand. It's exciting, terrifying, exhilarating, nerve racking, freeing, and stressful all at once, but I wouldn't want to do anything else.


    some more meaty advice for you.

    Cultivate relationships with business owners who are older wiser than you are and throw yourself to their mercy for advice and most of all constructive criticism. AND never let your instinct to follow your own ideas over theirs.

    And... if you can find a way to step out of the dog-eat-dog competitive markets, do so. For me in the nursery business that was pretty easy. I got lists from wholesalers of what they were growing for the next season (items that put me in direct competition with area nurseries) I went through seed catalogs with a magic marker crossing out everything that the wholesalers were growing ... and I started growing the things they weren't.

    What this did was give me products that had no direct competition on the retail level. Therefore I could charge "what the market would pay" for them. The higher mark ups I made on the crops I was producing allowed me drop prices on everything I bought from wholesalers so I could draw in customers in droves who quickly became buyers of the "next new things" I was constantly introducing each season.

    Sure there were some failures in that process but the successes far outweighed them.

    And never ever forget that the best advertising dollars you can spend is on making sure satisfied customers are running their mouths at every opportunity.

    And find an accountant/bookkeper who's an organizational nazi.


    Finding a mentor is among my top priorities. There are so many things I don't know, so many things business schools don't teach, that finding someone in the field wiser than I am to ask for advice will be crucial.

    The field I'm in is highly competitive, so I'm just trying to carve out a niche. Fortunately there aren't any big players involved so I'll have a chance eat before the big dogs show up.

    Bobbobbob, thank you so much for your great advice! You got me thinking about so many different things. Let's continue this conversation through email.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 03, 2015 10:23 PM GMT
    ^^^^Don't be shy^^^^^

    It's good to read any business ideas that others have tried and have been successful.

    I hope you'll post your answers & comments here for us to all review!

    Thanks for your cooperation....haha
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 12, 2015 12:21 AM GMT
    What Dan Price Should Have Done Before Increasing Everybody's Salary to $70K


    http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/what-dan-price-should-have-done-before-increasing-everybodys-salary-to-dollar70k/ar-BBlEAFy