Would You Give Up Your Dog or Cat?

  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16305

    Oct 05, 2007 5:37 PM GMT
    I'm lucky enough to have been given 2 great registered beagles. My first beagle (who is now 6) I received 5 years ago from a great family who just couldn't give him proper attention.... the 2nd beagle last Thanksgiving from a family who was moving to Texas and couldn't take her. I wouldn't give them up for anything (within my control), but would you? When is it "right" to give up your dog or cat?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2007 6:14 PM GMT
    Our kitties are our children, our family. Before we got all the girls fixed, we did have a few litters of kittens, and we did have to give some away. And, we also had to give away the cute little stray that walked in the door and into our hearts because she was freaking out the other cats. We realize now that having four cats is too much, and in the future, we'll restrict ourselves to one or two. But, the ones we have now are here to stay.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2007 6:39 PM GMT
    I think having a pet is for life. Unless you become incapable to taking care of your pet, you are obligated to be the provider and guardian of the pet.
  • OptimusMatt

    Posts: 1124

    Oct 05, 2007 8:22 PM GMT
    Not a chance in hell - I couldn't turn my back on my animals. I could never turn my back on something that loved me as much as my dog.
    My cat...well, she's a survivor; seriously, lol, a gimp paw, rabies, and a car accident. She's 5 lbs, catches rabbits for sport, and craps in a box; you can't get much better than that. Besides, I know she loves me too, and I can't turn my back on that.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Oct 05, 2007 8:23 PM GMT
    I got a kitten the summer before 3rd grade. I had to give her up when I went to college, though, as no University housing allowed cats at my school. Actually, the only pets allowed were obligate aquatic animals in tanks of 10 or fewer gallons. So, she went to go live with my Dad, and eventually became my step-mother's cat. A year ago I finally would have had the opportunity to take her back but after not living with me for 7 years, the fact is that she doesn't really seem to be my cat so much as my step mother's cat these days. The cat's also rather on the old side now. After she's gone, I might get another cat, but I don't know enough people in the area who stay here during the Christmas holidays to be able to ask one of them to look in on one while I'm gone, and I don't want to upset the old cat by bringing a strange cat with me while visiting for the holidays.

    On the other hand, we had a dog for a few months when I was a kid, before my cat came into the picture. The dog attacked both my brother and me several times, so we got rid of it. Safety of the kids trumps any sort of commitment to a pet, in my book.

    I think it's important to recognize that a pet is a significant commitment. At the same time, I also think that some people go too far with that sort of commitment. People who wouldn't evacuate from Katrina because they couldn't take their pets with them, for instance. I've also known a few people who've developed allergies to their pets--in some cases, rather severe ones--who nonetheless continue to keep them. It's not a position that's going to win me a lot of points for expressing, but my feeling really is that other animals are less important than people, and there are times when giving up the pet is the right thing to do.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2007 8:32 PM GMT
    never !! my cat is like a family member ..
    but maybe if the conditions force me I may give her up, only if it's better for her..
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2007 8:32 PM GMT
    Not willingly.

    R
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2007 8:50 PM GMT
    No, never. They'd have to be pried out of my cold dead hands.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2007 9:05 PM GMT
    now ask me about my boyfriend... icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 05, 2007 9:21 PM GMT
    What about your boyfriend?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2007 2:18 AM GMT
    Absolutely not... under any circumstances! I've been through that before when I had to move to a different place and couldn't have a dog or cat there. I made sure I adopted them out to good homes, but to this day I wonder what became of them.

    Having a "pet" is more like having a child. They depend on you for shelter, food, safety, health care, companionship and love... just like a child. The unconditional love and loyalty they give you in return is absolutely priceless.

    I'm with Nickster on this... you'd have to pry my cat out of my cold, dead hands...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2007 2:20 AM GMT
    "now ask me about my boyfriend"

    I meant now ask me if I would give up my boyfriend vis-a-vis my cats. ... icon_twisted.gif
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16305

    Oct 06, 2007 2:45 AM GMT
    I can't ask you about your boyfriend, you called me a pigee since I have one of my own....LOL LOL
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Oct 06, 2007 2:51 AM GMT
    My dog is 10 and I know I don't have a whole lot of time with her left. There's no way in hell I'd give her up for anyone or anything.

    HD7.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2007 3:12 AM GMT
    I've, and my family, have always had pets, and no we have only parted with them in extremis.

    MSUBioNerd, your story reminds me of my sister who, the animal lover that she is acquired a mini lop rabbit sometime in college -- they had permitted them the year before. Well after a couple of months into that year the powers-at-be decided that rabbits were forbidden and that she must now dispose of the rabbit. Well my parents, or rather my mother, who lived in Guam, agreed to take the rabbit when we came home for Christmas, and she found a friend to keep the animal until that time. So come Christmas with a vets bills of health, and an $80 air ticket, Benny-the-Bunny set out for Guam. All was fine until we got to Narita Japan where we were to change planes. But NorthWest Airlines had apparently cancelled all flights to Guam indefinately due to a typhoon. But Continental was flying to Guam and they would transfer us over to a flight leaving shortly.

    So we went and picked up the 'labbit' (Japanese pronunciation of rabbit) from a very nice Japanese gentleman in customs and proceeded to Continental. That we had to pick up the labbit from customs should have been a clue of what was to come, but we were naive. Our arrival at the Continental Airlines desk caused an immediate and raucus scandal. The airline staff, who were rent-a-staff from Japan Airlines, wanted nothing to do with the labbit, as 'regulations' prohibited bringing the animal. Well we argued long and hard, and I got into a yelling match on the phone with the local Continental manager about regulations and typhoons, but to no avail, and we watched the plane leave. My sister was in tears at this point with visions of leaving the Benny in the Narita airport.

    So we finally called my parents and explained things to them. They went to NorthWest and talked to the Guam manager who talked to the Continental manager and got them to agree to take the labbit. So we left the labbit with customs, or whatever the department was, and went the the hotel that NorthWest provided for the night content that everything was resolved. Well that was not to be, as when we got to the airport the next morning it was the same manager as the night before and he didn't give a hoot about the management in Guam, but the labbit wasn't going period. So we went back to NorthWest which still wasn't flying to Guam, but they would fly us to Saipan with the rabbit -- about 1/2 flight from Guam. We decided to take it, despite the fact that the lady at the ticket counter emphatically told us we would never get the rabbit from Saipan to Guam. We told her that was our problem.

    When we got to Saipan and asked for two tickets for us and one for the rabbit they weren't even excited. Yes, of course the rabbit could go, just take him down to cargo. So 10 minutes and $30 later Benny was tagged and ticketed for Guam, and narrowly avoided being left behind in the Narita airport.
  • DrStorm

    Posts: 185

    Oct 06, 2007 3:18 AM GMT
    My dilemma was when I moved to San Francisco from Tampa and my ex-boyfriend could not move with me. I simply could not separate the two cats who totally were dependent on each other and I know had I separated them and brought my girl with me I'd have been doing it for my selfish wishes and not had her interest at heart. I miss the fierce bitch. Good to know she drives my ex up the wall at times. Daddy taught her well!


    20010619_xena_003.jpg


    XENA - the FIERCE (DYKE) BITCH!

    20010907_cats_001.jpg

    The two together!

    Daddy misses you bitches!icon_cry.gif

    PEACE

    daWeatherMan

    (PS - lucky Daddy is still good friends with your other Daddy...I get to see her again!)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2007 3:58 AM GMT
    bionerdo wouldn't evacuate from Katrina because they couldn't take their pets with them, for instance.


    I honestly don't think I would've left New Orleans without my dog, there's just no way I could leave him behind to die.
  • MarvelClimber

    Posts: 511

    Oct 06, 2007 5:31 AM GMT
    I certainly wouldn't die for my dog, but I wouldn't evacuate without him either. I don't plan on staying in my current town past next year. Wherever I move to next I will be sure I can bring my dog there. It doesn't make sense to me when I see people/families giving up pets after 3+ years with the excuse that their future home won't allow pets. The saddest part is most of those older pets don't get adopted and have to be put down.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2007 5:44 AM GMT
    I don't think I could...I've had to do it before, and it just sucked.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2007 6:08 AM GMT
    I'd have a hard time giving up my cat, especially since her first owners gave her up after they got a dog (I got her from the Humane Society). I think having a pet is an important commitment. Domesticated animals rely on us for their basic needs -- for which they give so much in return.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2007 6:27 AM GMT
    When I went off to college I had to leave my Adam behind. luckly my brother took him in but still it was hard. He know it was me thought when I came back to vist. He jumped up on my car looked right at me through the winshield and and gave me that "HOLD ME YOU STUPID HUMAN!" meow that just made me melt every time. I actually want a beagle but i hear they test their limits when they are little and in new environments. I wonder how that would work in college and living in an apt.? Whats your advice?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2007 6:28 AM GMT
    i should also mention that i really love cats maybe even more so than dogs but im extremly allergic to them. my lesbian friend gives me so much crap about it since I love playing with her cat "Bear".
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 06, 2007 9:55 AM GMT
    Timberoo...

    She's a beautiful girl!

    Our oldest dog is 12, and I know there aren't many more years left with her, though I don't like to think about it. I find myself giving her extra attention, extra praise, even extra treats now because I want to make her golden years special for her.


  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Oct 06, 2007 3:06 PM GMT
    Thanks, NativeDude icon_smile.gif

    Montana's a sweetheart, gets along with any dog or cat who isn't agressive and obeys commands from just about anyone. I don't think I'll ever find another dog like her.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2007 1:12 AM GMT
    I found myself in a situation last year in which I was compelled to take in a dog who was in a very difficult situation. He is a pit bull/lab mix who had been severely emotionally neglected (tied to a tree 24/7) for the first two years of his life. Because of this he turned out to have not only socialization issues but also advanced heart worm infestation (this is in FL, all dogs eventually get heart worms unless administered preventative). I struggled with him five months trying to get him well and as civilized as possible. I originally intended to keep him as a companion for my other high-energy dog, but I had to finally admit that he was too much for me in this situation. I won't go into the painful details, but it was pretty close to hell at the time.

    Let me assure you, I'm not quitter when it comes to this, my first dog was a rescue at 6 weeks of age with at least 4 potentially lethal diseases, and three of our current dogs are hound mixs with independent streaks and strong hunting/running behaviors.

    It took another month but I finally found a home for that dog that would suit his needs, and his future owner turned out to be almost supernaturally suited to him.

    So, in a nutshell, yes, sometimes you do have reason to give up a dog, but there are right and wrong ways to do it. The four dogs we have now all the result of people who originally "gave them up" the wrong way (One was dropped on a vet's doorstep when he was 2 months, one was a Memphis street dog, one was luck enough to wander up to a farm owned by a vet, and one was about to be given to the pound because her fat owner was to lazy to deal with her). Its far better to try to find someone who's strengths will make up for your weaknesses.