Master Penman Jake Weidmann

  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Aug 10, 2015 2:07 PM GMT




    http://www.jakeweidmann.com/
  • metta

    Posts: 39167

    Aug 10, 2015 2:30 PM GMT
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    Aug 11, 2015 12:47 PM GMT
    I think he's cute. icon_wink.gificon_wink.gif
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    Aug 11, 2015 1:30 PM GMT
    kscott6671 saidI think he's cute. icon_wink.gificon_wink.gif

    And not a bad public speaker. Good stage presence.
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    Aug 11, 2015 2:27 PM GMT
    metta8 said

    Here he pushes for teaching handwriting in school. It was indeed a graded subject when I was in grammar (elementary) school. We learned from the Palmer Method book, in 3rd and 4th grades. I think that's all the handwriting instruction we got.

    We weren't allowed to print our work, only cursive was accepted. As a result I don't print well to this day, and only in capital letters; I can't do lower case at all, not even sure how to form most of them.

    He stresses the ink pen. That's all we were allowed to use. Ball points weren't permitted, as much because the early ones in the 1950s were messier than fountain pens. And other pen types, like felt tips, didn't exist.

    At first I wrote my homework with a "stick" pen I dipped into an inkwell on my bedroom desk, because a fountain pen was heavy and clumsy for my small hands. And even after I could handle one I still would write some things with the inkwell pen, because of the choice of nibs (points) that allowed a calligraphy effect when I wanted it.

    To this day I still use a fountain pen for most of my writing with ink. My signature differs when written with a ball point, so I sign legal documents with a fountain pen. For a signature that looks almost the same as it did over 55 years ago, when I learned with an ink pen.

    One of my many eccentricities was to carry this solid sterling silver fountain pen with me during Army Basic Training, Advanced Training and beyond. We needed a pen to take notes during field & classroom instruction. Most guys had Bic ballpoints, while I had this. Oh, and I also wore a solid 18k gold wristwatch. Not surprisingly I got the (unmerited) reputation as the "rich kid".

    This thing was in my fatigue pants as I low-crawled through muck, took PT tests, bivouacked, it never left me. I finally retired it for newer when I became an Officer, needless to say it was becoming a little the worse for wear. Though a really tough pen, no plastic except for the finger grip.

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    Aug 12, 2015 7:11 AM GMT
    I remember as a child my mother being appalled at my indecipherable handwriting. Her plan of action to remedy? She would check my homework every evening and even if it was 100% corrected she would tear it up and make me do it over again if it was sloppily written. I tell you I learned to write beautifully very quickly. To this day people compliment me on my penmanship and I'm shocked at how most adults' handwriting is atrocious.