Did you know that the plague is still around?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 10, 2015 6:21 PM GMT
    And people in the US get infected with it every year?icon_eek.gif

    http://gizmodo.com/a-child-in-los-angeles-has-the-plague-1722978945
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 10, 2015 6:29 PM GMT
    Yes, it is rare that anyone gets it, but it is still out there.
  • metta

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    Aug 10, 2015 6:38 PM GMT
    Yep....nothing new about that. And the article is accurate. Antibiotics are used to treat it now. I live next to a forest in S. Cal. There was a bear behind my home last night. I don't ever touch the wildlife. I enjoy seeing them from a distance.

    Ever since I saw a lost dog come out of the forest with ticks...yuck....I have no desire to go near them.
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    Aug 10, 2015 6:44 PM GMT
    metta8 saidYep....nothing new about that. And the article is accurate. Antibiotics are used to treat it now. I live next to a forest in S. Cal. There was a bear behind my home last night. I don't ever touch the wildlife. I enjoy seeing them from a distance.

    Ever since I saw a lost dog come out of the forest with ticks...yuck....I have no desire to go near them.


    Metta8, look out a big ole bear ate a hiker at yellowstone. They're really hungry now with the water situation and looking for snacks.
  • metta

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    Aug 10, 2015 6:46 PM GMT
    ^
    My pear tree is full of pears...they can share with me. ;) Actually, they have done that before.
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    Aug 10, 2015 6:59 PM GMT
    I got vaccinated for it when I was in the Navy.

    I camped in Lassen many years ago and there were signs or handouts saying that the squirrels had fleas with the plague so don't feed them or encourage them to come into your camp site.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Aug 10, 2015 11:41 PM GMT
    At least it no longer wipes out half of populations.
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    Aug 11, 2015 12:35 AM GMT
    Uncommon and easily cured at this point, thank heavens.
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    Aug 11, 2015 2:30 AM GMT
    Rhi_Bran saidUncommon and easily cured at this point, thank heavens.
    But because it's so rare, diagnosis is often delayed.

    The history of plague in North America is fascinating. It arrived in San Francisco from China at the turn of the 20th century, causing several local outbreaks. The earthquake and fires that devastated the city in 1906 flushed out rats into the surrounding communities, where the rat fleas took a liking to other rodents, especially ground squirrels. Little by little the infection spread from animal to animal east into the Sierra foothills, then south to the mountains of Los Angeles and Orange County by the 1920s, where it remains enzootic today. The last locally acquired cases in LA were in 1924.
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/databank/entries/dm00bu.html
    http://articles.latimes.com/2006/mar/05/local/me-then5
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    Aug 11, 2015 3:59 AM GMT
    woodfordr saidDid you know that the plague is still around?
    Yes. They post on RJ frequently. icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2015 2:32 PM GMT
    A couple of years ago I read an article that claimed it was quite common in the Grand Canyon.

    There is however some controversy as to what actually caused "the plague." Some researchers think the pandemics that swept through Europe in the high Middle Ages and into the Renaissance were actually caused by Ebola.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2015 5:20 PM GMT
    ^^ Do you have a link pertaining to these researchers' theory on Ebola and the Middle Ages? I'm curious as to why they would think Ebola instead of the plague since one of the signs and symptoms of Ebola is hemorrhagic fever.
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    Aug 11, 2015 6:01 PM GMT
    Erik101 said^^ Do you have a link pertaining to these researchers' theory on Ebola and the Middle Ages? I'm curious as to why they would think Ebola instead of the plague since one of the signs and symptoms of Ebola is hemorrhagic fever.


    Here is an ABC News link:

    http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=117310

    The report says an Ebola like virus, so perhaps it wasn't the same exact thing.

    As I recall, many of the people who suffered from the plague actually did have a hemorrhagic fever. That's one of the things that pointed them towards Ebola (or something like it) as the likely culprit.

  • metta

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    Aug 11, 2015 7:49 PM GMT
    metta8 said^
    My pear tree is full of pears...they can share with me. ;) Actually, they have done that before.



    one of the bears just walked though my backyard and into my neighbors. I managed to take a couple...not very good pics of the bear while it was at my neighbors house. This one is young...maybe a few years old..isn't it cute! icon_wink.gif

    11855635_10154120749874392_6219671811382


    11217551_10154120749649392_1895901049166
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 11, 2015 8:02 PM GMT
    ^ Ha thats awesome. I wish we had bears here but there are no big wild animals in Uruguay, we only have a feral thing bigger than a cat but they're like a myth because you literally never see them.
  • metta

    Posts: 39089

    Aug 11, 2015 8:15 PM GMT
    ^
    we get mountain lions, bob cats, coyotes, etc.

    With the river and creek next to us, we get a lot of water birds as well, like egrets and ducks, etc.
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2603

    Aug 11, 2015 10:09 PM GMT
    Yes.
    Like so many diseases, it`s in abeyance for now rather than extinct.
    But there`s always going to be new ones coming along!
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    Aug 11, 2015 10:11 PM GMT
    apparently when I was little I climbed on a cows head and was sitting there, I don't remember but I was told my mother was scared to get me off
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    Aug 11, 2015 10:16 PM GMT
    bonaparts saidapparently when I was little I climbed on a cows head and was sitting there, I don't remember but I was told my mother was scared to get me off
    That's good your mother was scared to get you off. Hopefully she still is. icon_lol.gif
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    Aug 12, 2015 5:52 AM GMT
    metta8 said
    metta8 said^
    My pear tree is full of pears...they can share with me. ;) Actually, they have done that before.



    one of the bears just walked though my backyard and into my neighbors. I managed to take a couple...not very good pics of the bear while it was at my neighbors house. This one is young...maybe a few years old..isn't it cute! icon_wink.gif

    11855635_10154120749874392_6219671811382


    11217551_10154120749649392_1895901049166


    Why did my inner voice read that in a whisper?
  • metta

    Posts: 39089

    Aug 13, 2015 6:06 AM GMT
    The bears have been appearing in my neighborhood almost daily recently. Here is one another neighbor took today

    11800367_10154125232684392_8823695975414
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 13, 2015 6:28 AM GMT
    metta8 said^
    we get mountain lions, bob cats, coyotes, etc.

    With the river and creek next to us, we get a lot of water birds as well, like egrets and ducks, etc.


    I know that canyon is dangerous. Why do you live there? lol
    Not to mention when it rains this fall you'll be swimming down the canyon!!!
  • metta

    Posts: 39089

    Aug 13, 2015 6:31 AM GMT
    I <3 where I live. I love being close to nature. I have a seasonal creek right behind my home. And I have some wonderful amazing neighbors. I realize that it is not for everyone, but it is a very special place to live. I grew up next to the forest and my home is next to the forest, which Obama turned into a National Monument. I don't like the idea of being surrounded by homes...but I also don't want to live in too far into boonies....it is a nice balance of rural forest living and city living. According to the flood studies, I think my home is probably pretty safe. The dams above me help control the flow. If we lose the two bridges, we would be in trouble. Hopefully we make it through this winter. They were built down to the bedrock so that makes them safer. But I have seen boulders bigger than cars and huge trees flow down the river like toothpicks in heavy rains. Nature is amazing and I love watching it. When rains are heavy, I can see waterfalls down the canyon walls from my front door.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 13, 2015 6:37 AM GMT
    Just don't go petting the wild squirrels. They are very aggressive about the nut hord!! They carry those ticks that can cause THE PLAGUE!!!! hhaaaa
  • metta

    Posts: 39089

    Aug 13, 2015 6:38 AM GMT
    haha...I don't touch any of them....I like to watch them from a distance.