Hospital's, go in alive, come out dead??

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 12, 2015 1:25 AM GMT
    Best practices to clean hospital rooms may not be enough to control infections

    http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/story/best-practices-clean-hospital-rooms-may-not-be-enough-control-infections/2015-08-11

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/12/business/dealbook/how-hackers-made-1-million-by-stealing-one-news-release.html
  • AttisXVI

    Posts: 293

    Aug 12, 2015 2:06 AM GMT
    We have to keep our Soylent Green production going somehow.
  • Oceans_of_Flo...

    Posts: 393

    Aug 12, 2015 12:08 PM GMT
    bleach.
  • oldfart

    Posts: 328

    Aug 12, 2015 1:05 PM GMT
    Go in alive, come out broke.
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    Aug 12, 2015 1:49 PM GMT
    oldfart saidGo in alive, come out broke.

    Broke = slow death

    For one of my husband's hospital stays (12 days) the total bill was almost $400,000. The pharmacy portion alone was $87,000. Fortunately with his excellent health coverage plan it actually cost us only a few hundred dollars. His hip replacement was around $50,000, of which we paid very little.

    It's thanks to a Medicare supplement that costs him nothing, zero, nadda, no monthly premium at all. I have the same plan, in addition to my VA medical coverage.

    Which I abandoned using here in Florida because the local VA is so terrible, even dangerous. The Miami VA is one of those that gave veterans HIV by reusing dirty instruments for colonoscopies. I was scheduled to have one there during the very time this incident was occurring, but fortunately I canceled because I already didn't trust them, having seen what a dump that hospital is. That decision may have saved my life, certainly my health.

    Another stay of only 6 days cost my husband nearly $300,000. Again, our out-of-pocket costs were only a few hundred. His cheapest hospital stay was 7 days, under $200,000, for his double stroke. That time the ambulance charge was as great as the hospital bill we paid, since his plan has a rather high fixed deductible for emergency EMS/EMT service.

    So in the last few years he's accrued nearly a million dollars in hospital costs. My cancer treatment cost a lot, too, I'm not sure what, but my co-pay was over $4000, that I had to pay in cash up front, before the treatment. Without adequate coverage we'd be really hurting. I don't know how some people manage - I guess they just remain sick and die.
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    Aug 12, 2015 11:29 PM GMT
    2Bnaked saidBest practices to clean hospital rooms may not be enough to control infections

    http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/story/best-practices-clean-hospital-rooms-may-not-be-enough-control-infections/2015-08-11

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/12/business/dealbook/how-hackers-made-1-million-by-stealing-one-news-release.html


    How is the ny times article related to the hospital infections?
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    Aug 13, 2015 4:01 AM GMT
    I work at a hospital and am surprised at how many people go into isolation rooms with no gloves or gown and touch everything and then only use hand sanitizer on their hands when they leave. I'm so paranoid when it comes to being clean, if I'm doing patient care then I'll double glove just in case one of them rip and I wash my hands with soap and water for 20 seconds afterwards.
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    Aug 13, 2015 7:50 AM GMT
    ^^ That would depend on why they're in isolation. If it's MRSA of the nares, don't bother gowning up since the infection is local and not systemic. But if it's C Diff, yeah wear your gown and gloves. That's something no one should ever catch.
  • NursePractiti...

    Posts: 232

    Aug 14, 2015 11:38 AM GMT
    Erik101 said^^ That would depend on why they're in isolation. If it's MRSA of the nares, don't bother gowning up since the infection is local and not systemic. But if it's C Diff, yeah wear your gown and gloves. That's something no one should ever catch.


    Actually that's incorrect. Per CDC guidelines gowns and gloves should be worn by healthcare staff when entering a room with a MRSA positive patient. It can be passed on to other patients, bedding, etc. C-diff requires you to wash your hands, not the alcohol scrub. I currently work in an ER. We have less than five seconds to wipe down a bed and get a new sheet on it. I wouldn't call it clean by any means. And most ER's are like that. Oh, there are guidelines and standards. Good luck on getting hospitals to pay for that extra staff that's needed to follow them. Some have said staff enter rooms that are isolation without gowns or gloves. This has been true in places I have worked from time to time. It's usually the same one or two people who do it. They should be reported to their supervisor and stopped at the door when they do this.

    http://www.cdc.gov/mrsa/pdf/SHEA-mrsa_tagged.pdf
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    Aug 16, 2015 6:58 AM GMT
    ^^ Show me the statistics that proves nosocomial infections via MRSA of the nares (not a systemic infection) is very common and runs rampant. Do you know how many healthcare workers are MRSA + in the nares? Test the staff you work with and all over the hospital. I bet more than 1/2 of them are positive.