LG Display Unveils Incredible New Flexible Televisions

  • metta

    Posts: 39089

    Aug 14, 2015 4:41 PM GMT
    LG Display Unveils Incredible New Flexible Televisions




    http://www.iflscience.com/technology/lg-display-unveil-new-flexible-technology
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    Aug 14, 2015 5:46 PM GMT
    It relies at present on OLED. But I understand Quantum Dots will be replacing OLED, for even better image quality. I wonder if Quantum Dot screens can also be made flexible?

    This technology should reach a plateau in a couple of years, and stabilize for a time. About when I'll want to replace our current HDTV, which was cutting edge 5 years ago, with one that's Ultra HD.

    Actually I read a study that indicates the human eye sees Ultra HD no more sharply than HD for the screen size and viewing distance we have in our bedroom, where we mostly watch TV. And unless we relocate, our current screen size & viewing distance will not change. But I would be interested in better color and contrast.

    I see no use for a flexible screen for us. A really large screen benefits from a curve, but those can be made fixed. Just possibly in our kitchen, to save more counter space with its super-thinness, allowing it to stick flush to the wall.
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    Aug 14, 2015 6:28 PM GMT
    This is about as useful as a gasoline powered turtleneck sweater. It looks cool as a demonstration but who would want their picture warped? icon_confused.gif
  • motivated

    Posts: 297

    Aug 14, 2015 7:10 PM GMT
    Why would this even be beneficial?? Plus there was a lot of glare....seems odd and unnecessary.
  • metta

    Posts: 39089

    Aug 14, 2015 7:15 PM GMT
    It would be good for mobile phones. The big ones may be used for corporate presentations....possibly replacing the old projector.
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    Aug 14, 2015 11:45 PM GMT
    Still, the technology of having a TV as thick & flexible as a piece of cardboard is kinds breathtaking. Our first family TV dates to 1949, same year I was born. That cabinet was very deep, and unseen here was a cone that extended out the back another 6 inches, to protect the picture tube neck, meaning you couldn't push it close to the wall.

    BTW, this cabinet was solid mahogany, not veneer, and weighed a ton with its heavy vacuum tube chassis, took several people to move it around. The 4 doors hinged back all the way flat against the sides.

    And now I watch some TV on my iPad that I can hold in one hand, and carry around in a shoulder bag. That's why all these new things simply astonish me, even If I probably won't need to roll up a TV like a newspaper.

    1949-RCA-9TC275-12in_zps7efgwjzn.jpg
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    Aug 15, 2015 1:07 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said... That's why these new things simply astonish me, even If I probably won't need to roll up a TV like a newspaper.
    Wouldn't it be nice to have an iPad and iPhone (or any other brand of tablet/phone) that you can fold up and stick in your shirt pocket? icon_wink.gif
  • Oceans_of_Flo...

    Posts: 393

    Aug 15, 2015 1:32 AM GMT

    They are on the way to whacking it and it turn hard, then whacking it again and it turn back to its roll up form, can you say the worst part of moving, made snappier? And then there is the eventual belt sword.

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    Aug 15, 2015 1:40 AM GMT
    Oceans_of_Flowers said
    They are on the way to whacking it and it turn hard, then whacking it again and it turn back to its roll up form, can you say the worst part of moving, made snappier? And then there is the eventual belt sword.

    I already have a device that turns hard when you whack it.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Aug 15, 2015 3:03 PM GMT
    I can see this being useful for fitting public monitor displays to curved walls and columns for things like information, advertising, etc.
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    Aug 15, 2015 4:07 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    Art_Deco said... That's why these new things simply astonish me, even If I probably won't need to roll up a TV like a newspaper.
    Wouldn't it be nice to have an iPad and iPhone (or any other brand of tablet/phone) that you can fold up and stick in your shirt pocket? icon_wink.gif

    Did the article say if this thin technology could be used for touch screens? And even if it could, wouldn't it need some rigidity to handle finger taps & swipes, and a stylus as I sometimes also use? That rigidity would prevent folding into pocket size.

    And my iPhone 6 (not the Plus) already fits in my pocket. To me anything larger is silly as a phone, it's like talking into a book. When I need a bigger screen for non-phone mobile tasks I've got the iPad.

    Nevertheless I'm not an opponent of new technology, which should be obvious, having 6 of the latest devices (3 for me and a matching 3 for him). I just need to see it in actual use, and be convinced it offers me practical advantages, not just gimmickry.

    I got the cheapest Palm PDA in the 1990s, to see if it would really be better than my current paper solution to organizing, not end up in a junk drawer. It proved itself and I upgraded to Palm's best, abandoning paper calendars & phone number lists. I had a cellphone in 1990 (how many of YOU did?), but resisted a smartphone until they became a bit more refined & capable.

    So I'll wait until I see the real-world benefits to me of a roll-up, foldable phone and tablet, should they happen. Not that there couldn't be, Paul, and I know how clever you are about these things.

    For myself I always remain technology accepting, but skeptical until proven. And also to make sure the concept, and specific products, have any market staying power, or if I'm buying into a dead-end. You know, avoiding the Edsel effect.
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    Aug 15, 2015 5:06 PM GMT
    OLED displays

    good:
    -improved color saturation from LCD. The OLED displays i have seen really could display bright colors if needed.
    -relies on a screen printing process so could achieve in the long run lower cost and surface dosnt need to be flat or rigid.
    bad:
    -seems in the OLED displays blue was difficult. They had to over drive the blue component to get a balanced performance
    -OLED technology not as stable over time compared to LCD, expect current crop of OLED displays to last about 3 years.

    I would suspect OLED technology to have moved on for the better so google is your friend if your booming to go out and buy...
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    Aug 15, 2015 6:14 PM GMT
    I never cease to smile when I see an ultra thin tv on top of a bureau at least twice as large as any of the old school models.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Aug 15, 2015 7:23 PM GMT
    It would make it easier to transport a large screen TV set. An 80 inch screen could fit into a cardboard mailing tube.

    Think about how nice it would be for traveling. You could take your 80 inch TV with you.