PrEP Myths Even Your Doctor Believes

  • metta

    Posts: 39090

    Aug 14, 2015 9:30 PM GMT
    PrEP Myths Even Your Doctor Believes


    http://feastoffun.com/podcast/2015/08/11/fof-2201-prep-myths-even-your-doctor-believes/
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    Aug 15, 2015 4:46 PM GMT
    Are card carrying gays blocked from looking at the Truveda site?

    IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
    What is the most important information I should know about TRUVADA?
    TRUVADA can cause serious side effects:
    Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious medical emergency. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, nausea, vomiting, stomach-area pain, cold or blue hands and feet, feeling dizzy or lightheaded, and/or fast or abnormal heartbeats.

    Serious liver problems. Your liver may become large and tender, and you may develop fat in your liver. Symptoms of liver problems include your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, and/or stomach-area pain.
    You may be more likely to get lactic acidosis or serious liver problems if you are female, very overweight (obese), or have been taking TRUVADA for a long time. In some cases, these serious conditions have led to death. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any symptoms of these conditions.
    Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. If you also have HBV and take TRUVADA, your hepatitis may become worse if you stop taking TRUVADA. Do not stop taking TRUVADA without first talking to your healthcare provider. If your healthcare provider tells you to stop taking TRUVADA, they will need to watch you closely for several months to monitor your health. TRUVADA is not approved for the treatment of HBV.
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    Aug 16, 2015 7:20 PM GMT
    ^ Most srong meds, specially new ones, will cause side effects. Its still good to take them if youre gay and sexually active with different partners as long as you dont get strong side effects. Because even mild side effects are better than to become poz.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4433

    Aug 16, 2015 10:26 PM GMT
    These side effects sound very much like the side effects of some statins which are universally acknowledged to be close to miracle drugs. All it means is that you should also have certain blood tests done after starting.

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    Aug 17, 2015 4:31 AM GMT
    Destinharbor saidThese side effects sound very much like the side effects of some statins which are universally acknowledged to be close to miracle drugs. All it means is that you should also have certain blood tests done after starting.



    Well, I knew the guys that died of the side effects hoping to
    the end that science was going to save them with miracle drugs. It was not a miracle , it was "marketing" .
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    Aug 18, 2015 12:45 AM GMT
    David666k said^ Most srong meds, specially new ones, will cause side effects. Its still good to take them if youre gay and sexually active with different partners as long as you dont get strong side effects. Because even mild side effects are better than to become poz.


    The newer drugs are easier to tolerate.

    High doses of AZT were horrible. Crixivan was known for 'crix-shits' and Sustiva is known for "vivid dreams".....more like dropping acid to me!

    Once considered part of the gold standard of HIV treatment, alternative regimens can now alleviate concerns about birth defects, psychiatric problems, and even suicide caused by the drug efavirenz.

    New drugs, dosages, combinations and usages are being developed all the time. They are much easier to take now.



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    Aug 18, 2015 12:48 AM GMT
    Alpha13 said
    Destinharbor saidThese side effects sound very much like the side effects of some statins which are universally acknowledged to be close to miracle drugs. All it means is that you should also have certain blood tests done after starting.



    Well, I knew the guys that died of the side effects hoping to
    the end that science was going to save them with miracle drugs. It was not a miracle , it was "marketing" .


    And do you know the MILLIONS of lives it has saved? Including me?

    Distrust pharmaceutical companies all you want (healthy attitude IMHO) but don't dismiss the science and medicine behind it.
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    Aug 18, 2015 12:58 AM GMT
    Alpha13 saidAre card carrying gays blocked from looking at the Truveda site?



    Everything you posted is true except for this ^^^^


    Every drug can be dangerous if not followed as prescribed. HIV drugs are no exception.

    Have you read the warnings for aspirin?

    Do NOT use aspirin if:

    you are allergic to any ingredient in aspirin
    you are a child or teenager with influenza (flu) or chickenpox
    you have bleeding problems such as hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, or low blood platelets
    you have active severe bleeding
    you have had a severe allergic reaction (eg, severe rash, hives, breathing difficulties, dizziness), to aspirin, salicylates (eg, salsalate), tartrazine, or an NSAID (eg, ibuprofen, naproxen, celecoxib)
    you are taking citrate salts (eg, calcium citrate) or mycophenolate

    Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

    Before using aspirin:

    Some medical conditions may interact with aspirin. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

    if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding
    if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement
    if you have allergies to medicines or other substances
    if you have alcoholism or if you consume 3 or more alcohol containing drinks every day
    if you have asthma, bleeding or clotting problems, growths in the nose (nasal polyps), hives, kidney or liver problems, heart problems, high blood pressure, stomach or intestinal problems (eg, ulcer, inflammation), heartburn, upset stomach, stomach pain, the flu, chickenpox, or vitamin K deficiency
    if you have high levels of calcium, aluminum, or magnesium in your blood
    if you are a child with a stroke, a weakened blood vessel (cerebral aneurysm) or bleeding in the brain, arthritis (rheumatic disease), or Kawasaki syndrome (a rare inflammation causing heart problems in children)
    if you have had your tonsils out or you have had oral (eg, mouth) surgery within the past 7 days

    Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with aspirin. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (eg, acetazolamide) because they may decrease aspirin's effectiveness
    Anticoagulants (eg, heparin, warfarin), clopidogrel, dicumarol, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (eg, ibuprofen, celecoxib) because the risk of their side effects, including risk of bleeding, may be increased by aspirin
    Insulin and oral antidiabetics (eg, glyburide, nateglinide) because the risk of their side effects, including low blood sugar (eg, hunger, shakiness or weakness, dizziness, headache, sweating), may be increased by aspirin
    Citrate salts (eg, calcium citrate) because the risk of toxicity may be increased
    Methotrexate or valproic acid because the risk of their actions and side effects may be increased by aspirin
    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (eg, enalapril), diuretics (eg, furosemide), mycophenolate, penicillamine, probenecid, sulfinpyrazone, or thyroid hormones (eg, levothyroxine) because their effectiveness may be decreased by aspirin

    This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if aspirin may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

    How to use aspirin:

    Use aspirin as directed by your doctor. Check the label on the medicine for exact dosing instructions.

    Take aspirin by mouth with or without food. If stomach upset occurs, take with food to reduce stomach irritation.
    Take aspirin with a full glass of water (8 oz/240 mL).
    Use aspirin exactly as directed on the package, unless instructed differently by your doctor. If you are taking aspirin without a prescription, follow any warnings and precautions on the label.
    If you take bisphosphonates (eg, alendronate), cation exchange resins (eg, sodium polystyrene), cephalosporins (eg, cefpodoxime), imidazole antifungals (eg, ketoconazole), penicillamine, quinolone antibiotics (eg, ciprofloxacin), or tetracycline antibiotics (eg, doxycycline), do not take them at the same time you take aspirin. Talk with your doctor about how you should take these other medicines along with aspirin.
    If you miss a dose of aspirin and you are taking it regularly, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

    Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use aspirin.
    Important safety information:

    Do not take aspirin for more than 10 days for pain or for more than 3 days for fever unless directed to do so by your health care provider.
    Check with your doctor if fever or pain worsens, redness or swelling is present, or new symptoms occur. If you have a sore throat that is severe, lasts for more than 2 days, or is accompanied or followed by fever, headache, rash, nausea, or vomiting, check with your doctor.
    Aspirin has aspirin in it. Before you start any new medicine, check the label to see if it has aspirin in it too. If it does or if you are not sure, check with your doctor or pharmacist.
    Aspirin may have calcium, aluminum, or magnesium in it. Ask your pharmacist which of these ingredients is in aspirin.
    Talk to your doctor before you take aspirin or other pain relievers/fever reducers if you drink more than 3 drinks with alcohol per day. Serious stomach ulcers or bleeding can occur with the use of aspirin. Taking it in high doses or for a long time, smoking, or drinking alcohol increases the risk of these side effects. Taking aspirin with food will NOT reduce the risk of these effects. Contact your doctor or emergency room at once if you develop severe stomach or back pain; black, tarry stools; vomit that looks like blood or coffee grounds; or unusual weight gain or swelling.
    Aspirin may reduce the number of clot-forming cells (platelets) in your blood. Avoid activities that may cause bruising or injury. Tell your doctor if you have unusual bruising or bleeding. Tell your doctor if you have dark, tarry, or bloody stools.
    Aspirin has been linked to a serious illness called Reye syndrome. Do not give aspirin to a child or teenager who has the flu, chickenpox, or a viral infection. Contact your doctor with any questions or concerns.
    Tell your doctor or dentist that you take aspirin before you receive any medical or dental care, emergency care, or surgery.
    If aspirin has a strong vinegar-like smell upon opening, do not use. It means the medicine is breaking down. Throw the bottle away safely and out of the reach of children; contact your pharmacist and replace.
    Use aspirin with caution in the ELDERLY; they may be more sensitive to its effects, especially those with a blood coagulation disorder.
    Aspirin should not be used in CHILDREN younger than 12 years old; safety and effectiveness in these children have not been confirmed.
    PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant, contact your doctor. You will need to discuss the benefits and risks of using aspirin while you are pregnant. Aspirin is not recommended during the last 3 months (third trimester) of pregnancy because it may cause harm to the fetus. Aspirin is found in breast milk. If you are or will be breast-feeding while you use aspirin, check with your doctor. Discuss any possible risks to your baby.

    Possible side effects of aspirin:
    All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become
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    Aug 18, 2015 6:52 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Alpha13 said
    Destinharbor saidThese side effects sound very much like the side effects of some statins which are universally acknowledged to be close to miracle drugs. All it means is that you should also have certain blood tests done after starting.



    Well, I knew the guys that died of the side effects hoping to
    the end that science was going to save them with miracle drugs. It was not a miracle , it was "marketing" .


    Bullshit. Side effects from what? Truvada?

    You truly are an anomaly. You live in one of the most progressive cities in the US yet your anti-HIV comments would make me think you're from some small hicksville town somewhere in the judgmental Midwest. How many gay men in SF are so closeted that they can't show their face?

    I bet you're a staunch Republican too.

    The funny thing is, I know dozens of people who have taken HIV meds for over two decades. I don't know one of them who has had any serious side effects from the meds. Yet you seem to know all it, really? I didn't tthese people that have died from the side effects of drugs. That's really interesting.


    Holy shit, I didn't read his profile LOL.

    I suppose it's possible to live in SF and not know what's going on. They have taken the lead in HIV prevention. Last year there were only 302 new infections. They fast track new HIV cases to immediate care. They are planning on getting to ZERO by 2020 and will probably make it.

    One of the councilmen has publicly told his story of why he went on PrEP.

    I doubt he listened to the podcast. That was one of the myths.
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    Aug 25, 2015 8:08 PM GMT
    So we're supposed to believe Marc Felion (a self-described PrEP-warrior) from a site called feastforfun (which BTW took a really long time to load) over an internist? Although it's not exactly shocking that PCPs aren't totally up on all the new ways to help us bareback "safely".

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    Aug 25, 2015 8:12 PM GMT
    Alpha13 saidAre card carrying gays blocked from looking at the Truveda site?


    Those side effects don't sound fun, but how about the part that states they don't really know what the long-term effects of the drug are? That's basically letting folks know they're guinea pigs. And then there's the part about how condoms should still be used....
  • metta

    Posts: 39090

    Aug 25, 2015 8:33 PM GMT
    The advice came from "Marriage and Family Therapist Damon L Jacobs, who for the past 24 years, has been working to inform and educate the public about HIV Prevention."
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    Aug 25, 2015 8:36 PM GMT
    CODY4U said
    Alpha13 saidAre card carrying gays blocked from looking at the Truveda site?


    Those side effects don't sound fun, but how about the part that states they don't really know what the long-term effects of the drug are? That's basically letting folks know they're guinea pigs. And then there's the part about how condoms should still be used....


    Oh for Christsakes! It's the same ingredients HIV patients have been taking for 25 years. WE'VE been your guinea pigs! OK? We've refined the meds for you.

    Give the POZ community a little credit. We've knowingly been taking experimental medications since 1985. All in the hopes that science will do us....and you.....ultimately good. Some of the old drugs were too strong, not effective enough and could kill you in their own right. Those worries are, for the vast majority, long gone.
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    Aug 26, 2015 11:00 PM GMT
    timmm55 said
    CODY4U said
    Alpha13 saidAre card carrying gays blocked from looking at the Truveda site?


    Those side effects don't sound fun, but how about the part that states they don't really know what the long-term effects of the drug are? That's basically letting folks know they're guinea pigs. And then there's the part about how condoms should still be used....


    Oh for Christsakes! It's the same ingredients HIV patients have been taking for 25 years. WE'VE been your guinea pigs! OK? We've refined the meds for you.

    Give the POZ community a little credit. We've knowingly been taking experimental medications since 1985. All in the hopes that science will do us....and you.....ultimately good. Some of the old drugs were too strong, not effective enough and could kill you in their own right. Those worries are, for the vast majority, long gone.


    Sorry. Thanks for being a guinea pig for a drug I will never use. Appreciate it! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Aug 27, 2015 12:31 AM GMT
    CODY4U said
    timmm55 said
    CODY4U said
    Alpha13 saidAre card carrying gays blocked from looking at the Truveda site?


    Those side effects don't sound fun, but how about the part that states they don't really know what the long-term effects of the drug are? That's basically letting folks know they're guinea pigs. And then there's the part about how condoms should still be used....


    Oh for Christsakes! It's the same ingredients HIV patients have been taking for 25 years. WE'VE been your guinea pigs! OK? We've refined the meds for you.

    Give the POZ community a little credit. We've knowingly been taking experimental medications since 1985. All in the hopes that science will do us....and you.....ultimately good. Some of the old drugs were too strong, not effective enough and could kill you in their own right. Those worries are, for the vast majority, long gone.


    Sorry. Thanks for being a guinea pig for a drug I will never use. Appreciate it! icon_biggrin.gif


    Are you sure you will never use it? Or your friends?

    Kind of selfish don't ya think?