How Sitcoms Handled Homos in the 70s and 80s

  • metta

    Posts: 39079

    Aug 16, 2015 3:42 AM GMT
    How Sitcoms Handled Homos in the 70s and 80s

  • metta

    Posts: 39079

    Aug 16, 2015 3:51 AM GMT
  • metta

    Posts: 39079

    Aug 16, 2015 4:22 AM GMT
  • metta

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    Aug 16, 2015 4:22 AM GMT
  • metta

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    Aug 16, 2015 4:26 AM GMT
  • metta

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    Aug 16, 2015 4:32 AM GMT



    WKRP

    Les on a Ledge
    When a local athlete overhears other reporters refer to Les as a "Queer Little Guy", Les gets banned from the locker room at the stadium for being gay. Whether true or not, the rumors prompt Les to contemplate suicide by jumping off the building. Meanwhile, Jennifer asks Johnny to get Herb off her back. Johnny does it by telling Herb that Jennifer used to be a man!
  • metta

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    Aug 16, 2015 4:39 AM GMT
  • metta

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    Aug 16, 2015 4:43 AM GMT
  • metta

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    Aug 16, 2015 4:58 AM GMT



  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 3:53 PM GMT

    You forgot one. In February 1971, All in the Family became the first sitcom to bring a gay man into America’s wallpapered, shag-carpeted, plaid-couched living rooms.

    And he turned out to be a former linebacker.

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    Aug 16, 2015 4:15 PM GMT
    The Corner bar in 1972, staring Ann Meara was the first to have recurring Gay character, by Vincent Schiavelli.
  • hebrewman

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    Aug 17, 2015 6:45 AM GMT
    metta8 said


    OH HOW I LOVE JULIA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • mar0302

    Posts: 273

    Aug 17, 2015 6:49 AM GMT
    We've come a long way.. from when President Reagan wouldn't even talk about HIV to equal marriage.. things have progressed really quickly.. we shouldn't forget that.. and here in the UK it's been the same journey, from the anti-buggery act that outlawed "being gay" to limited legality of gay sex in 1967, gays in the military, civil unions and then to marriage.. and more recently to apologising for Alan Turing's suicide.. the man that decoded German code in WW2 and helped save us, but who committed suicide because he was gay..
  • hebrewman

    Posts: 1367

    Aug 17, 2015 6:53 AM GMT
    metta8 said


    AND AGNES MOOREHEAD AS ENDORA (POOF)

    "SO DARRIN. YOU WANT ME TO VACATE THE PREMISES?" LOL

    CLASSIC.... THANKS.

  • hebrewman

    Posts: 1367

    Aug 17, 2015 6:54 AM GMT
    you forgot billy crystal in SOAP. a very cutting edge sitcom.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2015 4:05 PM GMT
    mar0302 saidWe've come a long way.. from when President Reagan wouldn't even talk about HIV to equal marriage.. things have progressed really quickly.. we shouldn't forget that.. and here in the UK it's been the same journey, from the anti-buggery act that outlawed "being gay" to limited legality of gay sex in 1967, gays in the military, civil unions and then to marriage.. and more recently to apologising for Alan Turing's suicide.. the man that decoded German code in WW2 and helped save us, but who committed suicide because he was gay..


    Who has seen "The Imitation Game":

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2015 4:18 PM GMT
    “All In The Family” had many groundbreaking gay episodes.

    Lest we not forget proof that “Archie Bunker” was actually nice, there’s the recurring gay drag character "Beverly LaSalle."

    When first introduced, “Beverly” was played for laughs, the "big broad" Archie had performed mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on.

    In “her” last episode, “Beverly” was tragic – beaten to death for being “different.” “Edith” was so traumatized that she questioned the existence of God – something she never even did in the episode in with “Edith” was raped.

    Consider how groundbreaking that was - not only was a fatal gay bashing treated as serious fodder on a 40 year old sitcom with its most lovable character questioning her faith but a TV bigot continued to evolve on gay issues, from bedrudgingly accepting gay flirtations to the implication that he may have accompanied Edith at Beverly's drag shows to being shaken himself over the fag bashing!
  • metta

    Posts: 39079

    Aug 17, 2015 4:23 PM GMT
    All in the Family S6 E04 - Archie the Hero

    Beverly Lasalle




    great episode! icon_smile.gif
  • metta

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    Aug 17, 2015 4:52 PM GMT
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2015 5:07 PM GMT
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 17, 2015 6:15 PM GMT
    mar0302 saidWe've come a long way.. from when President Reagan wouldn't even talk about HIV to equal marriage.. things have progressed really quickly.. we shouldn't forget that.. and here in the UK it's been the same journey, from the anti-buggery act that outlawed "being gay" to limited legality of gay sex in 1967, gays in the military, civil unions and then to marriage.. and more recently to apologising for Alan Turing's suicide.. the man that decoded German code in WW2 and helped save us, but who committed suicide because he was gay..


    I think it would be fairer to say that Turing committed suicide because of how he was treated as a result of being gay.
  • metta

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    Aug 17, 2015 6:38 PM GMT
    ^
    not to mention the damage done from the drugs they forced him to take.
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    Aug 17, 2015 8:12 PM GMT
    Aside from the sitcoms, there were some made-for-tv movies that addressed the issue. I was too young to understand exactly what was going on in "That Certain Summer" (1972) with Hal Holbrook and Martin Sheen but I always remembered the reaction of the son played by Scott Jacoby. He was so pissed!

    Another was "Making Love" (1982) with Kate Jackson, Michael Ontkean and Harry Hamlin.

    Whoever gave the greenlight for these movies was either gay or brave or both! icon_wink.gif

    And then there was Mary McCarthy's "The Group." Not made for television. Homosexuality was just a small part but I'll never forget the character played by Larry Hagman's vitriol...



    Lillian Hellman. What becomes a legend most? Indeed.

  • metta

    Posts: 39079

    Aug 17, 2015 8:23 PM GMT
    ^
    Interesting stuff...I have not seen any of those.

    https://www.facebook.com/sam.kalidi/videos/10153309963101622/


    Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), director Howard Hawks. Audiences of the time thought these virile young men were...straight
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    Aug 17, 2015 8:31 PM GMT
    Def missed John Ritter in Threes Company. Basically 'played gay' so that his straight landlord, Stanley Roper, wouldn't think living with two girls was any big deal. Many references to Jack Tripper's sexual orientation. And John Ritter was some nice eye candy on the show icon_razz.gif




    Jack Tripper: Was He Good for the Gays?
    http://soref.tv/jack-tripper-good-for-the-gays/


    Of course, Jack Tripper was pointedly not gay, that was the premise of the show. But Jack was comfortable pretending to be gay, and even when he was being his hetero, skirt-chasing self, he had a sensitive demeanor: He cooked, he spoke in a high-register, he had a baby face, and he seemed very comfortable being one of the girls with Chrissy and Janet. Jack Tripper was TV’s first metrosexual.

    Jack was a closeted straight man, and he was the much beloved star of one of TV’s top-rated shows for many seasons. He was TV royalty, and for those of us old enough to remember the show and young enough to have been shaped by it, Jack Tripper made gay okay.

    They say that acceptance of gay equality is sharply delineated along age lines. Statistically speaking, the younger you are, the more accepting you are. I’ll bet that for a lot of Boomers and Gen-Xers, the weekly allotment of Tripper vs. Roper laid more of the groundwork for their acceptance than they are aware of.


    ThreesCompany1.jpg