calculate a restrurant tip

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 6:16 AM GMT
    to impress
    use Siri to calculate the next tipage
    with the iPhone off and locked
    press the home button while saying:
    "calculate the tip on 45.53 dollars"
    let go the button
    the iPhone will display a few options and speak the 18% dollar value

    use the calculator with Siri:
    "multiply 2 times 99"
    it speaks "the answer is 198"

    reference:
    http://osxdaily.com/2012/10/04/7-good-uses-of-siri/
  • AMoonHawk

    Posts: 11406

    Aug 16, 2015 6:45 AM GMT
    198????
    That doesn't sound right.

    All you have to do is take 10% of 45.53, which is just remove the last number:
    4.55
    then take half of that and add it to the 4.55 and you have 15% or just round up to even numbers:
    4.55 + 2.30 = 6.85 ... and depending on the place and service you could just as easily calculate 20%: 9.10
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 7:14 AM GMT
    It's hilarious how many people use their phones to calculate tips instead of using their brain.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 9:45 AM GMT
    my bad; apple Siri, when it first came out, got on my ignore list years ago. Last night i read the link and the calculate multiply whole key words thing looked useful. the tip thing in dollars is quaint essential geek.

    Erik101 saidIt's hilarious how many people use their phones to calculate tips instead of using their brain
    The same thingy was said about the slide rule. soon ill start reading south beach posts.
  • NealJohn

    Posts: 187

    Aug 16, 2015 1:38 PM GMT
    I calculate based on the service. 2$ is a base and it builds from there. In my opinion a server is lucky to even get a tip; I go out to eat to spend money on food not on people. The restaurants should pay servers more , not pass the buck to their customers
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Aug 16, 2015 2:47 PM GMT
    NealJohn saidI calculate based on the service. 2$ is a base and it builds from there. In my opinion a server is lucky to even get a tip; I go out to eat to spend money on food not on people. The restaurants should pay servers more , not pass the buck to their customers


    But the reality is, they don't, which means that you're punishing servers for poor restaurant policies and labor laws. Service is a hard job and I say that as a former server when I was in university. Consider the tip what the restaurant should be paying their servers (as you said above) or would be charging if service was included, like in Europe and Asia. Since most servers make well below minimum wage, not tipping because one "doesn't agree with the practice" is like not stopping at a stop sign because one doesn't like the color red.

    In terms of the original topic, it's a shame that basic math skills like simple addition are being forgotten thanks to the powerful computers we carry fused to our hands. Calculate it in your head or on paper, it'll be a good brain teaser.
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Aug 16, 2015 2:48 PM GMT
    Erik101 saidIt's hilarious how many people use their phones to calculate tips instead of using their brain.


    I always do 20% tip

    So check says $14.25 => 1.425*2 => $2.85 tip So the total is $17.10
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 3:02 PM GMT
    I always live at least a 20% tip to my server , this is a minimum , if you want your server to be able to have a roof above his head and food in his plate .
    Don't be cheap to your server !!!!!!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 3:02 PM GMT
    For 15% that's $3 for every $20 spent or for really good service (20%) $4 for every $20.

    If the bill is $65, then 3 x 3 + (3/4) = $9.75 tip. [$5 is 1/4 of $20 so 1/4 of $3]. In this case, I'd just round the tip to $10.00.

    What I refuse to do is tip for counter service where I'm not dining in or am expected to bus my own table. Tip jars at counters are tacky. To me it's like begging.
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    Aug 16, 2015 3:12 PM GMT
    neffa saidI always live at least a 20% tip to my server , this is a minimum , if you want your server to be able to have a roof above his head and food in his plate .
    Don't be cheap to your server !!!!!!!


    That depends. If it is a very expensive restaurant where you get tiny portions for big bucks and leave the restaurant hungry, I tip the standard 15%.

    If it's a moderately priced restaurant with good value for the amount food you get and the bill is reasonable then I'll tip 20%. It's usually in these types of restaurants the servers are working their asses off and more than likely to be stiffed by other customers.

    If it's a coffee shop where I'm drinking coffee and eating a Danish or piece of pie at the counter, the tip can be as high as 50%.

    An old friend of mine used to look for any infraction on the part of the server to leave a poor tip. I hated going out to eat with her. Every meal was an unpleasant experience as she bitched and complained about everything in her attempts to justify a lousy tip. As we would get up from the table to leave, I'd always slip extra money to the tip when she wasn't looking.
  • starboard5

    Posts: 969

    Aug 16, 2015 3:17 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk said198????
    That doesn't sound right.

    All you have to do is take 10% of 45.53, which is just remove the last number:
    4.55
    then take half of that and add it to the 4.55 and you have 15% or just round up to even numbers:
    4.55 + 2.30 = 6.85 ... and depending on the place and service you could just as easily calculate 20%: 9.10


    Yes. I just move the decimal one place to the left and double that. Typically, I round up.

    I agree with Bunjamon; service is hard, taxing work. And I disagree with NealJohn: I do not go out to eat just for the food. If it were just about food, I'd stay home. Dining out is about the total experience, which includes service. So why not just pay servers a living wage? That would be decent, but also, in a sense, service is performance, and why reward mediocre performance as you would excellence?

    Go to decent restaurants and you will rarely find poor service; customers would complain, management would notice, and it wouldn't be tolerated. The worst service I've ever had? At a Hooters (don't ask; it wasn't my call lol.)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 3:38 PM GMT
    If ever I should need a calculator for that, what I'd pull out of my pocket instead is a revolver to head off further dementia.

    In as quickly as it took to glance at the number 45 I came up with a $9 tip or a tenner if the guy was nice.

    Keep the change; that's change I wouldn't want.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 4:24 PM GMT
    NealJohn said... In my opinion a server is lucky to even get a tip; I go out to eat to spend money on food not on people. The restaurants should pay servers more...

    bet this one dosnt get out of the house much anymore
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    Aug 16, 2015 4:53 PM GMT
    Figuring a tip is the easiest thing to do when you leave them 20% (which is normal for good service in a good place in these times). So - for every $10.00, just leave $2.00. A $50.00 tab = a $10.00 tip. The only time I would consider leaving less, is if the server was showing a poor attitude or ignoring us. That rarely ever happens though. Most servers are great people who work very hard and deserve 20%. When the server is really trying, I leave more than 20%.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 4:59 PM GMT
    I gotta admit, when the bill goes over $100 into 3 digits I will take out the iPhone to use the calculator. It's late, I'm sleepy with a full stomach, I wanna get it right.

    Most of the time I just mentally multiply by 2, which is simple if we're not into 3 digits. And increasingly the check itself has a range of suggested tips printed at the bottom.

    When that first started I was surprised that in some places the top amount was only 18%. Then more became 20. But the other day I got a check that showed 22%. I still gave 20. Only bartenders get more from me. Or servers who arrange special meal items for me.
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    Aug 16, 2015 5:35 PM GMT
    Jockbod48 saidFiguring a tip is the easiest thing to do when you leave them 20% (which is normal for good service in a good place in these times). So - for every $10.00, just leave $2.00. A $50.00 tab = a $10.00 tip. The only time I would consider leaving less, is if the server was showing a poor attitude or ignoring us. That rarely ever happens though. Most servers are great people who work very hard and deserve 20%. When the server is really trying, I leave more than 20%.

    Do you know we've invited some of our regular servers over to our home for dinner? Which of course WE served to THEM. LOL! And we've been to some of their homes.

    As soon as we sit at the table of a new eatery where we haven't been before, or at a regular place but with a new server, or a new bartender, we introduce ourselves, often with a handshake and always a big smile. I know I come across here as just the opposite, but in person, in real life, I treat everyone with warm respect.

    With the result that most of the other servers on duty but who are not at our table, will nevertheless come over and say hello. I'll always stand up to greet them, unless it's a really "ritzy" place where I know the management frowns upon those displays.

    We'll hug, usually kiss (man or woman), talk about stuff since we last met. Someone who serves me, who waits on me, deserves my respect & appreciation, not my disdain. My parents, bless them, drilled that into me.

    If my Mother ever caught me as a kid being disrespectful to a server (waiter/waitress back then), or any kind of blue-collar worker, she'd snap at me: "Robert, you're not better than anyone else. Everyone is equal to you. Apologize and behave yourself!" Her words still echo in my ears.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 6:29 PM GMT
    When I go out to eat, I am tipping for the service, not the quality of the food.
    The establishment is charging for the food.
    The server is there to do the "leg work" of setup, conversation and pleasantries, presentation, cleanup, checking-in for refills or requests...

    Generally, I only tip in whole dollars, not change and will normally round up to a whole dollar. I start at $2 and will add 10% for "basic service", 15% for pleasant/friendly service, 20% for great service, not being rushed, not being overly checked on or ignored, and 25% or more, for very personalized attention or if there was an issue with the food and the server was unable to have the kitchen fix it after various attempts, or the server got the meal removed from the bill... these are food issues not service issues and I don't penalize the server for that...but the restaurant will likely not have my business again.

    If the service was really poor, I leave loose change in a drinking glass....with or without the drink in it... icon_rolleyes.gif
  • ASHDOD

    Posts: 1057

    Aug 16, 2015 9:08 PM GMT
    Erik101 saidIt's hilarious how many people use their phones to calculate tips instead of using their brain.



    not only tips........icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 9:11 PM GMT
    AMoonHawk said198????
    That doesn't sound right.

    All you have to do is take 10% of 45.53, which is just remove the last number:
    4.55
    then take half of that and add it to the 4.55 and you have 15% or just round up to even numbers:
    4.55 + 2.30 = 6.85 ... and depending on the place and service you could just as easily calculate 20%: 9.10


    A lot of people don't view numbers this way. I always associate numbers with their half, quarter and double, then the halfs, quarters and doubles of those numbers. It makes me quick with tips and calculating sale prices
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Aug 16, 2015 10:06 PM GMT
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 16, 2015 10:16 PM GMT
    just grab the total, divide it by 10, times 2 -> 20%
    Add it all up.
    Done.
  • TheBaise

    Posts: 363

    Aug 16, 2015 11:17 PM GMT
    No need to pay a tip unless you caused some problem, like spilling your soup or something / where your server had to do extra work. If you have to reward her, just leave a buck. That's enough. She gets paid, and gets free food. We'd go broke tipping everybody who worked.
  • ChilaxinJOCK0...

    Posts: 1513

    Aug 17, 2015 3:07 AM GMT
    Does no one slide the decimal!?
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    Aug 17, 2015 3:55 AM GMT
    Lol. Why do people make tipping so complicated? The math is already done for you on the bill. Look at how much local tax was charged. So let's say your sales tax is 10%. Look at the dollar amount on the sales tax line. Just double that amount if you want leave a 20% tip. Or subtract a few bucks, and adjust according to the level of service you got.
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    Aug 17, 2015 4:06 AM GMT
    xrichx saidLol. Why do people make tipping so complicated? The math is already done for you on the bill. Look at how much local tax was charged. So let's say your sales tax is 10%. Look at the dollar amount on the sales tax line. Just double that amount if you want leave a 20% tip. Or subtract a few bucks, and adjust according to the level of service you got.


    Because so many people suck at math. Give them fractions, square roots or any two lines forming an angle and watch their heads explode.