Adobe Premier Pro

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 23, 2015 2:26 AM GMT
    I've been using Photoshop for almost a decade, and have been editing video for nearly that long using Vegas.

    I just upgraded to Adobe Premier Pro a couple hours ago and found the learning curve to be less than I'd expected (quite easy to find 'most' of the stuff I'm used to).

    However, I still consider myself a newb at this and would love some insight from anyone else here who's got more experience with this amazing piece of technology. Finding the stuff I'm used to isn't all that hard, but I wanna delve deep and learn all the in's and out's of it.

    BTW I got the entire Creative Suite, which includes programs I've never used (Illustrator, etc) so any info on how to get started with those would be appreciated as well. Looks like I just found a new nighttime hobby (after working and/or riding bikes all day).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2015 1:32 AM GMT
    Update: Thanks to instructional videos on YouTube, I've found almost every feature I was already familiar with in Vegas...putting together a sick edit now. icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2015 2:21 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidUpdate: Thanks to instructional videos on YouTube, I've found almost every feature I was already familiar with in Vegas...putting together a sick edit now. icon_cool.gif

    Perhaps you mean "slick" edit?

    But I'm not criticizing your accomplishment. I found Photoshop too daunting for me, and not intuitive to learn. At least not for MY intuition. I would need an instructor to get me started.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2015 3:11 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidUpdate: Thanks to instructional videos on YouTube, I've found almost every feature I was already familiar with in Vegas...putting together a sick edit now. icon_cool.gif


    I assume you're probably using this one, but if not, Howard Pinsky has been a big help

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC48fSJKMFBka3Zl0u7DGf0A

  • mstone18

    Posts: 84

    Aug 24, 2015 4:57 AM GMT
    An interesting topic.

    I looked over Windows vs OSX programs

    Windows MovieMaker vs iMovie

    Windows Premier vs FinalCut

    And I use Sony Vegas and Camtasia semiregular, as an amatuer, nothing professional.

    The things I wrestled with were first the "Linear Editor" versus "Storyboard or Clips" approach to editing.

    The "pros" use linear editors, the "amateurs" usually use storyboarding.. basically because the "pros" like to go back and forth switching and swapping clips.. and the amateurs just want to point and shoot and never look back.

    The "defining" difference between a Linear Editor and a Storyboard is layers or "tracks". A storyboard essential has one track for everything, video, sound, title, end credits.. its one single "thing" and very straight forward for amateurs to think about. A linear editor has many tracks, which can be sequenced and brought in or out, faded in or out, or rearranged and blended together like the elements in a multi-level drawing or photograph. Keeping track of all those possible elements can be confusing and time consuming for an amateur and complete over kill for their purpose. I've heard some people say Linear Editing is like "Painting with your mind" and the "Final Cut" is only one possible rendition.. which is why Linear Editors always "Save as a project" and have to be purposefully told to "Publish or Render" a movie.

    Vegas is very much a Linear Editor.. it demands setup, and finishing touches be explicitly done by the human editing.

    Camtasia "used to be" firmly a storyboard program, which teachers and coaches loved.. but they changed focus and have been trying to become a Linear editor since version 8.. which has confused their user population a lot. Perhaps for this reason.. they are perfectly okay with owners of version 8 downgrading to using version 7.. as long as they remain customers.

    Premiere and FinalCut are also very much linear editors, and there is a fascinating Wikipedia article on the origins of Linear Editing.. basically it comes from the VHS or Video Tape era which was made to mimick the old Cellulose Film approach.

    MovieMaker came from PhotoStory and took the Storyboard approach, pick a few clips and let the program string them together and bookend with a title and closing credit and done.. very little human intervention required.

    iMovie was somewhat like MovieMaker, and the later iOS version

    I guess its only fair to also mention Apple dumbed down FinalCut in version 10 (or 'X') to be more storyboard "like" which is really odd since Camtasia seemed to be going in the other direction. Apple is a confusing company. The hardware keeps escalating in quality, the software keeps regressing.. together I guess they balance out.. but I never expect a lot of predictability from Apple products.. just a premium price.

    Integration between Adobe programs came about mostly like Windows Office in that they strung them together with a metalanguage that allowed an extended workflow between the programs. PhotoShop was especially good at color correction.. and could render.. but took a long time. Aftereffects was good at tweening.. Illustrator was also good at vector graphics, which are great when your trying to do overlays to fit on top of a pixelated background where the resolution can change, with vector graphics you don't have to redo your artwork.

    Dividing up the workload between programs that specialized in one feature or another.. is not unlike the Office Suites of old.. Lotus, Microsoft, Wordperfect, Corel.. ect.. you gather a cluster of programs and sell them as an ensemble.. or as Adobe has done.. rent it with promises of upgrades.

    The key to Microsofts success was arguably their "hard disk is a file" with OLE2. Office documents became proprietary "virtual hard disks" such that .doc files could contain a seperate file for every kind of program in the Office suite arsenal. But the .doc file was a compound document, which most competitors didn't understand. This was around the time pkzip and Arc files and Tarballs were coming into use.. but no one else seized upon it to support "workflows". Creating a virtual name space.. simplified everything for users and every Office document became a "project".

    I will be the first to admit its overwhelming.. but what I have done is try to focus on those tools I already know or am best at using.. and nibbling on the more advanced ones if a need arises. In the meantime.. studying their history on Wikipedia helps to put them into perspective.. so I don't waste too much time trying to use the best tool in every case.

    The best tool is the one you already know how to use.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2015 5:33 AM GMT
    It gets even crazier with After Effects.

    Did you do the subscription thing where you pay a monthly or whatever fee?

    I used to have fun with Illustrator making tiles / tessellations. The tricky part is finding good color combinations.

    tumblr_ntkn7zTbs21u21poao1_400.gif tumblr_ntkn8cGCdz1u21poao1_400.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 24, 2015 2:03 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidIt gets even crazier with After Effects.

    Did you do the subscription thing where you pay a monthly or whatever fee?

    I used to have fun with Illustrator making tiles / tessellations. The tricky part is finding good color combinations.

    tumblr_ntkn7zTbs21u21poao1_400.gif tumblr_ntkn8cGCdz1u21poao1_400.gif
    Yeah, I got the entire package...Illustrator, After Effects, etc. Not sure how often I'll use Illustrator, but I'll definitely start playing with After Effects later this week when I get the new video close to finished.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 25, 2015 2:40 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    paulflexes saidUpdate: Thanks to instructional videos on YouTube, I've found almost every feature I was already familiar with in Vegas...putting together a sick edit now. icon_cool.gif

    Perhaps you mean "slick" edit?

    But I'm not criticizing your accomplishment. I found Photoshop too daunting for me, and not intuitive to learn. At least not for MY intuition. I would need an instructor to get me started.
    Nope, I actually meant "sick" edit. Then again, I do usually hang out with a younger crowd and stay informed on the latest slang.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 25, 2015 4:16 AM GMT
    I used Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 Classroom in a Book and found it excellent. I looked at the table of contents for the newer version for CC (2014) and it looks the same. The 2015 version is to be available September 16.