Bircidis/chronic inflamation of both shoulders,and elbo's

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 06, 2007 1:30 AM GMT
    I take a very strong anti-inflamatory medication but it only keeps the pain at bay if I don't use the affected joints (shoulders/elbos) For decades I did butterflies with weights, pullups, pushups, weight lifting for my bicepts/tricepts, and etc. now if I do any of the above in any consistent pattern I pay dearly for it. DAMN !!! LOL !!! It gets bad enough that it become painfull even to type at the computer keyboard, put a shirt on, or open a car door. HELP !!! Isn't there something that will permanently end this inflamation? Any ideas? Known cures that I may have missed? I have tried fish oil capsules, glucosamine/congroiten, currently on anti-inflamatories, but nothing has brought about an end to the problem. I would appreciate your responses !!! icon_confused.gif
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    Oct 06, 2007 3:46 AM GMT
    See your doctor about testosterone, and nandralone. Both will keep your joints from getting to dry and aching, and will have a wide variety of positive benefits.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Oct 06, 2007 5:54 AM GMT
    It is spelled Bursitus- In case you want to google it. I know someone who has a severe case and the only relief they get is from prescription adhesive Lidocane patches. They are expensive, but the will stop the pain. For a treatment approach you should see a good Board Certified Rheumatologist. For cure- research Glucosamine Chondroitin omega3 MSM white willow bark combinations. Remember all medication including supplements have side effects.

    Good Luck

    Mike3
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    Oct 06, 2007 7:09 AM GMT
    Sorry to be the spelling snob, but it's actually spelled bursitis.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Oct 06, 2007 5:49 PM GMT
    Actually it is spelled both ways:

    Treatment for Bursitis (Bursitus Treatments):

    In some people gentle stroking of the muscles near and around the affected joint eases bursitis. A popular folk remedy used for arthritis, black cherry juice may also work to relieve bursitis.

    Taking up medications such as ibuprofen or aspirin may be helpful to reduce pain and inflammation caused by Bursits. However do consult your doctor before taking any of these if you have a history of stomach ulcers or are on any type of blood thinning medications.

    In case your bursitis is not infectious, the health care provider may inject the bursa with a corticosteroid in order to reduce inflammation. However, the results last for varying length of time with different individuals. On account of potential complications, injections are usually given in no more than three times per year and at least 30 days apart from each dose in treatment for bursitus.

    Bursitis which is caused by infection is treated with antibiotic medications. In some cases the infected bursa must be drained surgically to help healing.

    In the quest to treat bursitis which results from overuse of body parts, as opposed to arthritis, the following steps would help:

    The body part with the problem should be provided with maximum rest. Temporary rest and immobilization of the affected body part or joint is a must.
    Apply ice on the affected part for the first two days. It should be applied 4 times a day for at least twenty minutes. After that apply moist heat to get relieve from pain, this will also stimulate blood flow to the affected part.
    Do not resume exercise until the pain has completely ceased.
    If the conditions persist, you must visit a physician who may give cortisone injections which will help to get the problem treated.
    Prevention of Bursitis:

    To counter the adverse effects of excessive exercise which results in bursits, gradually build up the frequency and intensity of the activity and always make sure to warm up and then cool down before and after every exercise schedule.

    Always change body position frequently. This point is very important if you sit at your desk for long hours. This frequent change in your position and posture will go a long way to minimize stress on specific tendons. Short breaks will only add to the benefit.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Oct 06, 2007 5:54 PM GMT
    some more info haditwantit:

    Bursitus
    Bursae are closed sacs, lined with a cellular membrane resembling synovium. They serve to facilitate motion of tendons and muscles over bony prominences. There are over 80 bursae on each side of the body. Excessive frictional forces or direct trauma may result in an inflammatory process in the bursal wall, with excessive vascularity.

    Only small numbers of inflammatory cells are found in bursal fluid in traumatic bursitus, but there may be a greater leukocyte response in bursitus secondary to other rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout. Septic bursitus is usually caused by organisms introduced through punctures, wounds, or cellulitis in the overlying skin.

    With modification of occupations and habits, many of the classic forms of bursitis are encountered less frequently, e.g., "housemaid's knee," "weaver's bottom," and "policeman's heel." Sports-related bursitis (e.g., "wrestler's knee," a prepatellar bursitus found in 10% of college wrestlers) is receiving greater emphasis.

    TROCHANTERIC BURSITUS
    Trochanteric bursitus is an inflammation of one or more of the bursae about the gluteal insertion on the femoral trochanter. This condition is most common in females and usually has insidious onset, preceded by apparent trauma in only about one-fourth of the cases. Aching pain on the lateral aspect of the hip and thigh is aggravated by lying on the affected side. The patient experiences tenderness posterior to the

    OLECRANON BURSITUS
    An inflammation with effusion at the point of the elbow occurs frequently with rheumatoid arthritis and gout as well as after trauma. Pain is usually minimal, except when pressure is applied to the swollen bursa. Elbow motion is unimpaired and usually painless. Fluid from the bursa is often serosanguineous

    PREPATELLAR BURSITUS
    This type of bursitus is a swelling between the skin and lower patella or patellar tendon, resulting from frequent kneeling. Pain is usually slight unless there is direct pressure on the swollen area.

    ILIOPECTINEAL OR ILIOPSOAS BURSITUS
    With this inflammation of a bursa between the iliopsoas and inguinal ligament, the patient complains of groin pain radiating to the knee, and often adopts a shortened stride to prevent hyperextension of the hip

    OBTURATOR INTERNUS BURSITUS
    This may result in low back pain. There is local buttock tenderness just below the posterior inferior iliac

    Treatment
    In general, therapy includes protection from irritation and trauma, either by modifying the patient's activities or by using appropriate padding. Anti-inflammatory drugs, heat, and ultrasound.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 06, 2007 5:58 PM GMT
    My new personal trainer said that he got into his field because of an extremely painful shoulder that drs were unable to take care of. I will ask him what he did to cure the pain. I see him next Wed. Oct 10.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Oct 06, 2007 5:59 PM GMT
    How is bursitis treated?

    The treatment of any form of bursitis depends on whether or not it involves infection. Bursitis that is not infected (from injury or underlying rheumatic disease) can be treated with ice compresses, rest, and antiinflammatory and pain medications. Occasionally, it requires aspiration of the bursa fluid. This procedure involves removal of the fluid with a needle and syringe under sterile conditions. It can be performed in the doctor's office. Sometimes the fluid is sent to the laboratory for further analysis. Noninfectious bursitis can also be treated with a cortisone injection into the swollen bursa. This is sometimes done at the same time as the aspiration procedure and typically rapidly reduces the inflammation of the swollen bursa.

    Infectious (septic) bursitis requires even further evaluation and aggressive treatment. The bursal fluid can be examined in the laboratory for the microbes causing the infection. Septic bursitis requires antibiotic therapy, sometimes intravenously. Repeated aspiration of the inflamed fluid may be required. Surgical drainage and removal of the infected bursa sac (bursectomy) may also be necessary. Generally, the adjacent joint functions normally after the surgical wound heals.

    Good Luck-Peace Mike3
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    Oct 06, 2007 6:12 PM GMT
    I agree that you see 'bursitus' all over the internet, but I have yet to find it in a dictionary, and one of the online medical ones listed 'bursitus' as a common misspelling of 'bursitis'.
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    Oct 06, 2007 6:33 PM GMT
    Hadit..., thanks for bringing this up, and MIKE...and others, thanks for the great answers. Think I have the elbow version. Dr never really looked at it but says it's probably arthritis.

    I believe the correct spelling is "bursitis". My dad had it some years ago.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Oct 06, 2007 7:09 PM GMT
    Both are derived form the bursa or bursae, knowledge is power- Look up both and try to work with a Dr. to find the type you have and review your tretment options. All too many times after the age of 30 many Dr.'s are all too quick to say it is just arthritis, and they just might be wrong. Ask questions advocate for yourself.

    You say tomato I say tamato, that part is not as relevant.

    A family member had burstis of the hip, I bought them the sleep number bed, and they said the have had the best sleep in years. I though it was funny, but would the original bionic woman lie?? I stayed at a Raddison recently for work, man it was great sleep. Mine is on order as we speak. I am told I am a very active sleeper, but I found myself in the same position I fell asleep in. I can't drive 55, but it's my sleep number. I am in no way making light of physical pain, but a little levity helps too now and then.

    Hey whatever works. If it can get you back to your optimun performance, I'm all for it!

    Peace-

    Mike3
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    Oct 06, 2007 7:45 PM GMT
    What has helped me most with my shoulder pain are dietary changes (no red meat, refined sugar, potato etc.) Also glucoamine/condroiton w/msn, vit.C , alpha lipoic acid
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    Oct 06, 2007 7:50 PM GMT
    Spelling War! Everyone run for cover.
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    Oct 07, 2007 3:01 AM GMT
    Hi men !!! I couldn't spell it, but I got it !!! LOL !!! I had tried several ways and just settled on the spelling you read above. Don't mind the clarification at all, I really appreciate the responses !!! Mike, thanks so much for taking the time to go into its causes and different treatments. I have had many cortizone shots in my shoulder/elbo, I tri to go 3 to 6 months between them, but a few times had to give in and go begging for the needle in my shoulder joint. thank god my doctor is great at giving them with minimul pain. I'll be trying the cold and hot compresses. I'll check with my Dr at my appt: this wed. the 10th re: the testosterone and the other suppliment mentioned. (thanks also to the responder for asking for information at his appt: on the 10th) (stil_lifting) As for Dietary changes, the ones listed would be hard for me to do without, but certainly worth a try, do you recall how long it took for the dietary changes to start showing positive results? Thanks again everyone for sharing your knowledge with me, I'll be taking the advise !!! Dennis
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    Jul 30, 2008 1:29 PM GMT
    It took about 3 weeks to a month before I started to notice the pain in my shoulders had subsided.