Humid Southern California? 100 degrees in Oct? WTF? El Nino 2015 Winter Rains Expected

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    Sep 22, 2015 6:18 AM GMT
    Along with the ongoing drought, the last two summers, 2014, 2015 have been extremely humid for our southern California region. Last year there were at least 7-8 pacific coast hurricanes and this year there has been I think 4-5 already. These don't make it up north, past Baja California because the water temps in the southern most part are cooler than the minimum temp, to sustain a hurricane, of 80 degrees. The storms are big enough though to bring humid air when they fizzle out and drench Arizona with down pours. We don't get the storms rain, we get its air. icon_confused.gif

    At least two of the hurricanes this year became tropical storms that hit the Hawaiian islands

    I am certainly used to <10% humidity when the outside temp gets into the summer degrees of 80-90, but as I know from the Midwest, you start getting what's called a "heat index" when you factor in humidity + temperature.

    We have been averaging 50%-70% humidity during the past two summers because of all these hurricanes. This years pacific coast beach water temperature was the highest on record between 71-75 degrees. Huge wave swells with some of these storms too.

    The last hurricane-tropical storm Linda, brought SoCal, summer days of 90%-100% humidity! icon_eek.gif

    Crazy, I hate humidity, you cant dry off, even fresh out of the shower! We are not used to this, at all, my AC has been getting a work out this summer icon_mad.gif







  • metta

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    Sep 22, 2015 6:32 AM GMT
    I agree. I hate this weather. I feel like I'm in some place like Florida, Georgia, India, Hawaii, etc. We have also had too many days with temperatures over 90 degrees. It has made me realize that I want to eventually move a little farther North...still in California, but closer to the coast. I can't do it right now. I have to wait for 2 people to pass away first because I have to help take care of them. They are both elderly and have health issues. Real Estate is too expensive but I'm sure if I give my self enough time, I can find something nice that I can afford.

    The other option would be along the coast in San Diego but prices have gotten too high over there as well.

    I actually have some friends that love the humidity.
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    Sep 22, 2015 6:48 AM GMT
    metta saidI agree. I hate this weather. I feel like I'm in some place like Florida, Georgia, India, Hawaii, etc. We have also had too many days with temperatures over 90 degrees. It has made me realize that I want to eventually move a little farther North...still in California, but closer to the coast. I can't do it right now. I have to wait for 2 people to pass away first because I have to help take care of them. They are both elderly and have health issues. Real Estate is too expensive but I'm sure if I give my self enough time, I can find something nice that I can afford.

    The other option would be along the coast in San Diego but prices have gotten too high over there as well.

    I actually have some friends that love the humidity.




    I know, do you think its changing, permanently? Ive been in SoCal for 14 years now and I don't remember this many pacific coast hurricanes, and this much humidity that we have had last couple of years. Some are predicting that an El Niño winter is coming this year, bringing rain, rain, rain to SoCal. We need it though, maybe these past two years have been a precursor to this winter.

    I don't mind the winter rain though, temps stay in the 60's for highs, don't matter with 100% humidity except its like Seattle minus the snow then.

    These sticky summers do bring back Midwest memories, especially those dam mosquitos. No wonder SoCal has had a rise in the number of west nile cases.

    The humidity will be over soon, sometimes I cant sleep at night without AC on, fans pushing humid air around my apartment are useless icon_mad.gif




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    Sep 22, 2015 7:05 AM GMT
    We haven't had a real el nino in years. With climate change I expect more extremes.

    In PS it's been dry then humid. But the rain is needed and welcome.....all across the state.
  • metta

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    Sep 22, 2015 7:15 AM GMT
    So PS has been getting humid. People like PS because it is dry heat. I don't know if this will become a regular thing or not. I know that historically, this is not normally. I just know that I don't like it. Year after year we are breaking record temperatures.
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    Sep 22, 2015 7:57 AM GMT
    metta saidSo PS has been getting humid. People like PS because it is dry heat. I don't know if this will become a regular thing or not. I know that historically, this is not normally. I just know that I don't like it. Year after year we are breaking record temperatures.



    I agree, Palm Springs 114 degrees and humid? Not normal at all, sounds rather deadly icon_confused.gif



    This is PS

    Dry-Wood-Sauna.jpg


    This is not PS

    steam-room.png

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    Sep 22, 2015 3:33 PM GMT
    When I did a major remodel of my house about 5 years ago, I considered not adding AC, but decided to anyway, and boy am I glad I did, especially now. Ceiling fans and ice water can only do so much! As for PS, it's been getting more humid there since the '90s due, some say, to the proliferation of golf courses and development that add moisture thru lawns and expanses of grass. Whatever the cause, it's noticeable and one more reason to go there only between late October and early April. And when things get too hot here in SD, I head north, waaaay up north to BC or the UP.icon_cool.gif
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    Sep 22, 2015 9:19 PM GMT
    We never got the rain! But it's less humid 28% dew pt 53, 91 feels like 89 lol.

    I've had friends in from Miami, Ft Lauderdale and Galveston, our humidity is nothing in comparison. Even if it does rain it dries out VERY quickly. There is usually one good rain during the summer. Monsoons in the AZ desert are common.

    My ideal is 105 and 12% humidity. I love it. 90 at night with the top down icon_smile.gif

    I don't consider it hot till it's 111. Generally the hotter the less humidity.




  • metta

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    Sep 23, 2015 1:14 AM GMT
    ^
    that sounds horrid. Hot and humid is not a good combination for me. I feel like the air is thicker/heavier.
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    Oct 13, 2015 2:49 AM GMT
    This is just cray cray, this current heat wave in Oct. 100 degrees downtown Los Angeles.
    Even more bizarre, beach temps are 90 degrees! Not even a Santa Ana wind event! I am going outdoor swimming tonight!

    Been running my AC for 4 straight days, mid October! icon_evil.gif



    Los Angeles has worst heat wave in 25 years
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/10/12/los-angeles-has-worst-heat-wave-in-25-years/

    Record-breaking heat has suffocated Southern California since last Thursday and will finally ease Tuesday.

    From Friday to Sunday, downtown Los Angeles hit 100 degrees on back-to-back-back days. The sweltering 100-degree stretch was the longest in 25 years and matched the longest ever recorded in October.

    Los Angeles’ last streak at least this hot occurred in April 1989 when there were four straight days at or above 100. Its longest 100-degree stretch on record occurred in 1955 when the mercury topped the century mark for 8 straight days August 31 to September 7.
  • metta

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    Oct 13, 2015 4:45 AM GMT
    9:30pm and 86 degrees out icon_neutral.gif
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    Oct 13, 2015 6:14 AM GMT
    metta said9:30pm and 86 degrees out icon_neutral.gif




    last night @ 11pm, it was 90 degrees, it finally got to 70 by 5am icon_eek.gif

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    Oct 13, 2015 10:18 PM GMT
    Right now it's 95 (fell like 95) and 29% humidity in Palm Springs. LA is 87 but feels like 90 with 52% humidity 9yuck!).

    I'll take PS! 29% is humid for us during the day. But OK. It should be in the 80s by now.
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    Oct 13, 2015 11:54 PM GMT
    We actually had a little wisp of fog moving up through the trees, just after sunrise yesterday. I almost shit a brick, thinking it was another damned fire!

    If the el niño thing comes off, it will be a disaster for us... all of our rain goes to California and the draught just drags on and on. icon_mad.gif
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    Oct 15, 2015 1:39 AM GMT
    I suppose with higher than normal coastal Pacific Ocean temps, that is bringing the humidity, will also contribute to the EL Nino rains this winter. Florida Atlantic/Gulf waters are still warmer though @ 80 degree hurricane weather





    Monstrous El Nino expected to hit Southern California
    http://abc7.com/weather/monstrous-el-nino-expected-to-hit-southern-california/1032185/



    Big storms are expected this winter, prompting warnings of El Nino in Southern California.

    A Jet Propulsion Laboratory expert who is sounding the alarm of the potential hazardous conditions made an appearance in Santa Monica Tuesday.

    JPL climatologist Bill Patzert has been tracking El Nino activity on satellites for months and he's convinced Southern California will be slammed with what he's calling a "Godzilla" storm this winter.

    "As we move into winter looking ahead to January, February and March, this El Nino is a monster and I guarantee you it's going to deliver," he said.

    The last two major El Ninos happened in 1997 to 1998 and 1982 to 1983.

    "If this behaves like the last two really large El Ninos, you're looking at double our normal rainfall and hopefully, double our normal snowpack in the Sierras," said Patzert.
  • metta

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    Oct 15, 2015 1:51 AM GMT
    ^
    Yep. I'm a little concerned being that my mom's home (steep hillside) and my home (steep cliff by the one road we can get in and out of our community in the canyon) are in burned areas. However, I will say that the guy who manages CalTrans in our area lives in my development. It is CalTrans that is responsible for keeping the main road clear. In storms, they normally have tractors sitting on the street ready to clear it.

    I'm also kind of excited to see the river. We had a 100 year flood in 2004 and nature was just amazing. Huge boulders the size of cars and huge tree trunks going down the river like they were toothpicks. Hopefully our bridges will survive it.

    "The last two major El Ninos happened in 1997 to 1998 and 1982 to 1983."

    The development that I live in was not built until 2002 so it will be interesting to see if we can pull this one off.
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    Oct 15, 2015 1:58 AM GMT
    ELNathB saidI suppose with higher than normal coastal Pacific Ocean temps, that is bringing the humidity, will also contribute to the EL Nino rains this winter. Florida Atlantic/Gulf waters are still warmer though @ 80 degree hurricane weather





    Monstrous El Nino expected to hit Southern California
    http://abc7.com/weather/monstrous-el-nino-expected-to-hit-southern-california/1032185/



    Big storms are expected this winter, prompting warnings of El Nino in Southern California.

    A Jet Propulsion Laboratory expert who is sounding the alarm of the potential hazardous conditions made an appearance in Santa Monica Tuesday.

    JPL climatologist Bill Patzert has been tracking El Nino activity on satellites for months and he's convinced Southern California will be slammed with what he's calling a "Godzilla" storm this winter.

    "As we move into winter looking ahead to January, February and March, this El Nino is a monster and I guarantee you it's going to deliver," he said.

    The last two major El Ninos happened in 1997 to 1998 and 1982 to 1983.

    "If this behaves like the last two really large El Ninos, you're looking at double our normal rainfall and hopefully, double our normal snowpack in the Sierras," said Patzert.


    I wonder if this will have any impact on all of the plans to 'naturalize' the LA River? I think we forget how raging that can get in a really big storm.
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    Oct 15, 2015 1:58 AM GMT
    metta said^
    Yep. I'm a little concerned being that my mom's home (steep hillside) and my home (steep cliff by the one road we can get in and out of our community in the canyon) are in burned areas.





    Well if biblical floods come this winter, it wont be a surprise since climatologists are expecting it, at least the crazy ass right wing nuts cant blame the gays, again, when sink hole and low lying flooding tragedy strikes icon_rolleyes.gif

    Clear the drains!

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    Oct 15, 2015 2:07 AM GMT
    ELNathB said
    metta said^
    Yep. I'm a little concerned being that my mom's home (steep hillside) and my home (steep cliff by the one road we can get in and out of our community in the canyon) are in burned areas.





    Well if biblical floods come this winter, it wont be a surprise since climatologists are expecting it, at least the crazy ass right wing nuts cant blame the gays, again, when sink hole and low lying flooding tragedy strikes icon_rolleyes.gif

    Clear the drains!



    "sink hole"

    Given how low the water table has fallen I wonder if we're going to have a bunch more of that?
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    Oct 15, 2015 2:09 AM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    ELNathB saidI suppose with higher than normal coastal Pacific Ocean temps, that is bringing the humidity, will also contribute to the EL Nino rains this winter. Florida Atlantic/Gulf waters are still warmer though @ 80 degree hurricane weather





    Monstrous El Nino expected to hit Southern California
    http://abc7.com/weather/monstrous-el-nino-expected-to-hit-southern-california/1032185/



    Big storms are expected this winter, prompting warnings of El Nino in Southern California.

    A Jet Propulsion Laboratory expert who is sounding the alarm of the potential hazardous conditions made an appearance in Santa Monica Tuesday.

    JPL climatologist Bill Patzert has been tracking El Nino activity on satellites for months and he's convinced Southern California will be slammed with what he's calling a "Godzilla" storm this winter.

    "As we move into winter looking ahead to January, February and March, this El Nino is a monster and I guarantee you it's going to deliver," he said.

    The last two major El Ninos happened in 1997 to 1998 and 1982 to 1983.

    "If this behaves like the last two really large El Ninos, you're looking at double our normal rainfall and hopefully, double our normal snowpack in the Sierras," said Patzert.


    I wonder if this will have any impact on all of the plans to 'naturalize' the LA River? I think we forget how raging that can get in a really big storm.




    The LA river channel is not very deep at all, with much, continued rain, it would certainly flood surrounding areas before the water gets to the ocean drains. The river could easily overflow its banks. Any naturalization plans would probably be on hold until after this event, there could be significant damage if there is too much water.



    L.A. River's Homeless Will Try to Beat the 45 MPH El Nino Torrent
    http://www.laweekly.com/news/la-rivers-homeless-will-try-to-beat-the-45-mph-el-nino-torrent-6148696


    Survivors like Hart challenge perceptions about homeless people. He also helps answer an important question that is now bubbling to the surface. What effect might a Godzilla El Niño have on the riverbed’s homeless encampments? Although El Niño isn't here yet, thunderstorms are predicted for Wednesday and Thursday, and the river may be in for some action.

    The weather pattern was on the minds of members of the Los Angeles City Council on Sept. 22, when they directed the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority to open its emergency winter shelter program early this year, and to keep it open until the rainy season’s end.

    Pineapple Express–driven torrents can reach the same killing speeds as a car, up to 45 miles per hour. When they pose a challenge to river residents, history shows that the people who live in the watercourse will survive. Most also prefer to cope without any shelter’s help, thank you.

    image
    Screen%20Shot%202015-02-13%20at%201.34.2


  • metta

    Posts: 39133

    Oct 15, 2015 2:22 AM GMT
    I have drains all over my property. It was a required for landscaping. This means the seasonal creek behind my home will be like a river. I <3 that. I'm asking the HOA to look into seeing if we need to do something to protect the pillars that hold up the bridges. They are made out of steel and cement and go down to the bedrock so hopefully they will make it. In 2004 we lost 15-25 feet of soil in the riverbed. It was incredible to see what nature can do. What was a level riverbed turned into a cliff in the riverbed.
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    Oct 15, 2015 2:26 AM GMT
    ELNathB said
    freedomisntfree said
    ELNathB saidI suppose with higher than normal coastal Pacific Ocean temps, that is bringing the humidity, will also contribute to the EL Nino rains this winter. Florida Atlantic/Gulf waters are still warmer though @ 80 degree hurricane weather





    Monstrous El Nino expected to hit Southern California
    http://abc7.com/weather/monstrous-el-nino-expected-to-hit-southern-california/1032185/



    Big storms are expected this winter, prompting warnings of El Nino in Southern California.

    A Jet Propulsion Laboratory expert who is sounding the alarm of the potential hazardous conditions made an appearance in Santa Monica Tuesday.

    JPL climatologist Bill Patzert has been tracking El Nino activity on satellites for months and he's convinced Southern California will be slammed with what he's calling a "Godzilla" storm this winter.

    "As we move into winter looking ahead to January, February and March, this El Nino is a monster and I guarantee you it's going to deliver," he said.

    The last two major El Ninos happened in 1997 to 1998 and 1982 to 1983.

    "If this behaves like the last two really large El Ninos, you're looking at double our normal rainfall and hopefully, double our normal snowpack in the Sierras," said Patzert.


    I wonder if this will have any impact on all of the plans to 'naturalize' the LA River? I think we forget how raging that can get in a really big storm.




    The LA river channel is not very deep at all, with much, continued rain, it would certainly flood surrounding areas before the water gets to the ocean drains. The river could easily overflow its banks. Any naturalization plans would probably be on hold until after this event, there could be significant damage if there is too much water.



    L.A. River's Homeless Will Try to Beat the 45 MPH El Nino Torrent
    http://www.laweekly.com/news/la-rivers-homeless-will-try-to-beat-the-45-mph-el-nino-torrent-6148696


    Survivors like Hart challenge perceptions about homeless people. He also helps answer an important question that is now bubbling to the surface. What effect might a Godzilla El Niño have on the riverbed’s homeless encampments? Although El Niño isn't here yet, thunderstorms are predicted for Wednesday and Thursday, and the river may be in for some action.

    The weather pattern was on the minds of members of the Los Angeles City Council on Sept. 22, when they directed the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority to open its emergency winter shelter program early this year, and to keep it open until the rainy season’s end.

    Pineapple Express–driven torrents can reach the same killing speeds as a car, up to 45 miles per hour. When they pose a challenge to river residents, history shows that the people who live in the watercourse will survive. Most also prefer to cope without any shelter’s help, thank you.

    image
    Screen%20Shot%202015-02-13%20at%201.34.2




    Big plans, which could be hugely altered by a monster storm(s)

    http://la.curbed.com/archives/2014/12/army_corps_now_reevaluating_billiondollar_la_river_rehab.php

    http://la.curbed.com/archives/2015/08/frank_gehry_la_river_plans.php

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-gehry-river-plans-20150828-story.html

    http://la.curbed.com/archives/2015/08/los_angeles_2024_olympics_bid.php[/url]
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    Oct 15, 2015 2:30 AM GMT
    metta saidI have drains all over my property. It was a required for landscaping. This means the seasonal creek behind my home will be like a river. I <3 that. I'm asking the HOA to look into seeing if we need to do something to protect the pillars that hold up the bridges. They are made out of steel and cement and go down to the bedrock so hopefully they will make it. In 2004 we lost 15-25 feet of soil in the riverbed. It was incredible to see what nature can do. What was a level riverbed turned into a cliff in the riverbed.


    Look at some of the pics of the 1938 flood in google images.
  • metta

    Posts: 39133

    Oct 17, 2015 5:22 AM GMT
    California Mudslides and Freeze and Frost Warnings in the Midwest



    http://abcnews.go.com/WNT/video/california-mudslides-freeze-frost-warnings-midwest-34534137

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-5-freeway-remains-closed-more-thunderstorms-expected-20151016-story.html
  • metta

    Posts: 39133

    Oct 17, 2015 5:26 AM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    metta saidI have drains all over my property. It was a required for landscaping. This means the seasonal creek behind my home will be like a river. I <3 that. I'm asking the HOA to look into seeing if we need to do something to protect the pillars that hold up the bridges. They are made out of steel and cement and go down to the bedrock so hopefully they will make it. In 2004 we lost 15-25 feet of soil in the riverbed. It was incredible to see what nature can do. What was a level riverbed turned into a cliff in the riverbed.


    Look at some of the pics of the 1938 flood in google images.


    I don't have to look that far. The area where my mom's home was built had a huge flood in 1969. My parent's home was not built yet but the street behind her home had several deaths. There was a forest fire and then heavy rains. We had a huge fire in the exact same area last year and we are getting heavy rains coming. It is a very dangerous situation, especially for the street behind my mom's home. They required a debris basin to be built next to my mom's home before they allowed her house to be built. So hopefully it does not get filled up too fast. Her street is much safer than the streets without a basin. The city and police say they are ready for it. There is the potential for a mountain of dirt to come down, possibly a few homes with it.