Riding in bad weather, best story. . .

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2009 10:02 AM GMT
    You're not a serious cyclist until you have been caught unprepared in the rain or snow, I say. I once was on a century ride, and I faced sun, rain, snow, sun, snow, and more rain on the all same day. Your best worst day ever was?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2009 3:54 PM GMT
    I almost dislocated my shoulder when riding to class in ice. The bike literally slipped out from under me as I was turning and my shoulder wrenched up. I was wet cold and crying from pain when I got to class. My professor called me an idiot. I went to the hospital, got a sling, couldn't ride for a week. Which was good, because the pills they gave me seriously fucked me up. My boyfriend was visiting me for the weekend. He thought I was hysterical.
  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    Feb 01, 2009 4:04 PM GMT
    Training for the AIDSLifeCycle last year, it was a long ride and very, very warm. I hadn't been doing enough smaller rides and jumped into doing a long ride. I had a couple of intense dizzy spells and then...woke up in an ambulance with a broken arm.
    Somewhat surprising since being safe and trying to remain injury free is always one of my top goals. Broke it again (undid the surgery) not being patient enough to let it heal and needed a second operation with a bone graft. Doh!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2009 4:06 PM GMT
    I presume this cycling is with bicycles, not motorcycles? I've had countless bad weather misadventures with motorcycles, none with bicycles.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2009 5:43 PM GMT
    sorry, this thread is for human power. maybe next time. . . .
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2009 6:56 PM GMT
    Worst rides both took place in the same 5 day adventure race.

    The first was a section of course that was supposed to take 3-4 hours. We missed a turn and decided to hike-a-bike straight up a mountain for 6 hours only to intersect with the actual course and realize we had lost all that time for no reason. Oh and I dropped my helmet part way up and didn't notice so I had to run down the mountain, find the helmet, and then run back up the mountain to catch up to my racing mates again. We lost a LOT of time on that section of the course.

    Second was having to cross a snowy mountaintop by dragging our bikes through the snow with us while wearing our biking shoes for hours. They are NOT good snow shoes! VERY uncomfortable and cold.

    Oddly, these are also great memories. Something to do with "you remember the adventure and forget the pain part."
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2009 7:59 PM GMT
    I hate it when the cold gets into your toes, you feel like they don't exist anymore.


    On a related human power kinetic movement story, last sunday i did a 90min run and came home looking like a snowman, damn blizzard.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 01, 2009 10:32 PM GMT
    Try kayaking - and standing in water doing a rescue - and theres ice on the edge of the river - the toes just dissappear and are replaced by pain!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 02, 2009 4:40 AM GMT
    Oh yeah, I do find it ironic that glacier-fed streams and rivers can set your limbs ablaze with the most intense fiery pain known to man (especially if you jam your foot into a rock after said fiery pain has set in). . However:
    1. this is a discussion about your most painful ride.
    2. however harsh the pain may be, the two situations are not equivalent.

    3. Therefore, although I acknowledge that it is intense and painful to get dumped when rafting or kayaking, I think we should try to keep it to stories most of us cyclists can relate too.
    Its like comparing apples to oranges though, and not really relevant to the discussion. I will now open a thread for: what sort of stupid/painful things have you done in the name of fun?

    --J
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 02, 2009 4:41 AM GMT
    Let's keep this going though, in the sense that I like cycling and relate to these stories the best!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 02, 2009 4:53 AM GMT
    I am usually smart enough to check the weather before taking off for a long ride. When I err, it's usually in going out when it's too hot.

    The worst one that I can remember was a 50 mile ride in about 95 degree heat. No biggie, except the seat post bolt snapped at about the 20 mile point. I managed to pedal it home with no seat (veeeerrrry carefully), but called in sick the next day.

    On my motorcycle... I've been caught out in the snow numerous times and a few times in floodwaters up to the footpegs. (Made the mistake of going to grad school in the flat lands. Damned uncivilized states with no drainage.)

    EDIT
    Oh yeah, forgot! One time I was out riding in the Columbia Basin and a dust devil picked me up and threw me into the ditch. Fortunately, the ditch was full of tumbleweeds, so it was only a million tiny cuts, and nothing big.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 02, 2009 6:05 AM GMT
    awesome!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 02, 2009 4:21 PM GMT
    DarkMatters saidYou're not a serious cyclist until you have been caught unprepared in the rain or snow, I say. I once was on a century ride, and I faced sun, rain, snow, sun, snow, and more rain on the all same day. Your best worst day ever was?


    Had several including being hit twice. But all in all my worst was several years ago. Mind you I am a very experienced rider (former racer) and ride well north of 7000 miles a year, so I am no stranger to adverse conditions and riding in driving rain storms and even snow and ice.

    But several years ago, in mid december, temps in the low 20s, I set out for my ride planing to do a moderate paced high mileage ride. One of my longer loops in the direction I was headed for the day. When I left home it was cold but sunny and still air.

    On the return side of my ride, the skies started to cloud up so I knew it would be getting darker sooner than planned, so I up'd the pace a bit to get home. Well I am about 40 miles still from home and I started to bonk. I handn't been hydrating or eating properly mainly due to the cold but more due to the easier pace I was originally keeping. I got extremely disoriented and in retrospect, started to panic. This was actually getting dangerous as I was now loosing my way...You get off the main road onto some side State routes, and you have no idea where you are going or how to get back. You resist the urge to backtrack, just thinking the next turn is up the road a bit...well it doesn't come and you have a couple extra miles under your belt so you keep forging on...you get the idea. Of course the smart thing would have been to get off the bike and get oriented and hydrated, and then back track. But when the above happens you are not thinking clear and your judgment gets impaired.

    Well luckily I eventually did stop and hydrated and ate an energy bar. (Funny the really weird thing I remember about that day was while I was stopped, another roadie passed me on his ride, and didn't even acknowledge that I was sitting on a guardrail in the middle of nowhere with my bike leaning up against me.) In a way that guy got me going, and back on the bike, I sort of rode through my distress, but still had no idea where I was. I was already backtracking and came upon a sign I recognized, and all was good shortly thereafter.

    As I said, I have been hit 2x and once seriously, but getting disoriented miles from home in the cold with daylight waning is not a fun experience.

    Safe travels

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 05, 2009 6:24 AM GMT
    One day, I set out without much in the way of supplies as I intended on just scouting out a quick 20mi loop. I left behind my bike computer, and I have notoriously bad bike feel. I found the main leg of the new loop I was checking out and it was delightfully smooth, with a wide shoulder and almost no traffic. Stupidly, I wondered how far I could go before these prime biking conditions would give out to either a dirt road or too much traffic. I started down the road for a "little bit".

    I began to wonder just how far I had gone when the open countryside began to sprout houses and shopping centers. I stopped at a gas station for a minute to get my bearings and realized I had been riding an incredible tail wind. My quick dash down the road had taken me almost 40 miles out of the way! I managed to scrape together five dollars for a granola bar and soda, then put my head down and began to grind out the long and painful miles back home.

    I figure I covered the first 40 miles in about 2 hours with the help of strong tailwind, and it took me about 3 to get back. Fortunately I was training for an ironman so the extra hours just helped me out.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 09, 2009 11:34 AM GMT
    I ran into a freakish down pour during the summer while on a 42 mile ride. It was so thick, I could not see and am sure that the drivers could not see me, however luck was on my side and a fire station was near by.
    Who does not like fire men ...right?
    Those guys were very polite and gave me some coffee and a towel. They offered to drive me home, but I realized that the shower would be a short one. After about 30 minutes the down pour was over. I thanked the fire men, hopped back on the bike and finished my ride.
  • junknemesis

    Posts: 682

    Feb 09, 2009 11:56 AM GMT
    I have one!!! I was riding my bike around town doing errands, and it was a warm day in January... during the day anyway. The mist was beautiful and visibility was crud. I visited a friend out of town and stayed much of the day. Since it had been warm all I had was my black zip up hoodie, and blue jeans. (Thank goodness for the jeans... you'll find out why)

    I left their house and went back to town (about a 5 mile trip) It was dark out... and cold. Sooo cold! (I later found out it was 5 degrees w/o windchill)

    I came into town, my hair was frozen, cause the heat from my body had melted the snow that had fallen on me, and then froze sort of. I had flakes comming off my hoodie, and the front of the legs of my jeans were damp from sweat and freezing rain. However that wasnt the worst of it.

    Entering town there is a hill by a major church building. I was going down that hill on my bike and had not taken into account that the mist and rain had made a layer of ice on the road. I hit a bump, and down I went, down the hill.

    I smashed onto my side, and the bike went flying, spinning on the ice down the road. I followed, since I had been going full tilt in speed cause I wanted to get home. I bounced, bounded, rolled, and flailed down this fairly steep hill on the ice.

    No helmet, pads, or anything. (This is where the jeans came in) Luckilly my light clothing was enough to save me from the majority of lacerations from ice shards, and aside from agonizing horrific pain from smashing every part of my body on ice I was only lightly damaged.

    My body hit the shoulder of the road and I slid back towards my now slowing bike. Since it was nearly midnight, there was sparse traffic,thank goodness!

    I slid to a stop and lay there stunned from a few hardy blows to the head. I had bruised severa ribs, and got a nasty cut on my right shin. (I still have the mark) There was a small trail of blood from where I got cut, and it was flowing nicely... and hurt.

    Headlights prompted me to grab my bike and move to the curb. The guy had plenty of time to see me down and hurting, but he didnt stop. (grrr)

    I got home, bandaged my leg, and went to the medical center the next day to discover I was reasonably uninjured.

    (In hindsight a warm bath would have felt good. Oh well. I'll take one later after I get home tomorow morning.)
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Feb 09, 2009 1:44 PM GMT
    OFF TOPIC,


    "I presume this cycling is with bicycles, not motorcycles? I've had countless bad weather misadventures with motorcycles, none with bicycles."

    Hey Red Vespa,

    Since this is a thread on bicycles, why not create a new topic on motorcycle. I would love to hear some of your amazing adventure.
    zak
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14354

    Feb 09, 2009 11:28 PM GMT
    I have some riding experience in rainy weather and it was the most unpleasant part of the bike ride. The worst part of cycling in the rain is dealing with puddles and streets that flood because of poor storm drainage. Another negative factor is when the wind picks up and you are riding against it and the rain is hitting you in the face. Not to forget about some of the rude, belligerant motorists and even some of the other cyclists who don't mind the wind and rain and they try to cut you off. I try to avoid cycling in inclement weather. As for snow and ice forget about it, the roadbike remains in hibernation.
  • gumbosolo

    Posts: 382

    Feb 10, 2009 3:13 AM GMT
    I took a long ride down the backroads and was out later than I meant to be, biking on a stormy night-- the rain was over, but the streets were still wet and the clouds were still thick. I was under tree cover far from any streetlights or houses. So everything was black, except the street, which was a little less black.

    I know this road, but wasn't really ready for the sharp downhill I hit. I took a bad skid, my breathing completely stopped, I hit my brakes for an instant, jerked the handlebars and found myself back on track, going down this curvy hill into the dark. I managed to stay on the road. No pain, but terror. Does that count?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 12, 2009 7:32 AM GMT
    Terror counts, did you end up carrying a light with you later?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 16, 2009 2:49 AM GMT
    Last summer was my first summer to try out mountain biking. I got a new bike, and after getting used to a few small, non-technical trails, I was ready for something more challenging. The ride started great. Nice and sunny out, a trail that was challenging enough for a beginner, but nothing too technical, temperature was about 70 degrees. After making it about halfway up the trail, it starting raining. I just kept riding, thinking "What's a little mud gonna hurt?" Due to my inexperience, I never thought of the rocks I was maneuvering my bike up getting slippery. I hopped my front wheel onto a rock maybe only 1.5 feet high, hopped my back tire onto it, and gave a nice push to climb it. Low and behold, water + moss on a wet rock make my bike tires slip and slide. I slid back down the rock, falling off my bike backward. So now I'm covered in mud, halfway up this frickin trail, my knee now nice and bloody from the rocks I landed on below, and I still have to make it all the way back home (only about 7 miles away, not very far). So I get up and hike my bike all the way up this hill. Once I got to the top of the trail, the rain had stopped, and there was a beautiful view. I enjoyed it for a bit, sat down to give my leg a small break, and drank some water. As soon as I got back on my bike ready to go down the other side of the mountain to start heading back home, it starts raining again. The trail is all muddy, covered in huge rocks that my tires just couldn't grip on, and more technical than I would have liked. After falling a 3rd time trying to go down the trail, I got off my bike and walked it down the rest of the trail. By the time I left, I was covered in mud, dripping from rain, my knee looked like I'd been stabbed, and damn did it sting. After a long ride back home, I had decided that maybe mountain biking in Vermont just wasn't for me.

    That all changed the next week when I gave it a shot during dry weather. I had a lot of fun, and didn't fall. Still haven't tried that trail again yet. This summer I plan to tackle it.