Cable & TV networks load up on commercials- horribly!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 04, 2015 8:17 AM GMT
    I finally decided to watch some weekend movies or shows on ATT Uverse. I am absolutely shocked and appalled at the amount of cable and network commercials. I don't have any premium movie channels so I get stuck with, in my pay tier, USA, TNT, Spike, SyFy, Logo ...etc. I do have Netflix instead of those premium to help keep ISP cost down, even if they have crap for movies, at least their is no commercials when watching them. On-line Hulu, TV and movies is incredibly bombarded with tons of commercial too. Of course You Tube now has at least one commercial before watching video and some have multiple "stops" for several advertisements.

    The standard cable channel 90 minute run movie (1.5 hour) now takes 2 to 2.5 hours to watch and a solid 120 min movie (2 hour) now takes 2.5 to 3 hours to watch. 10 minutes of movie, 5 minutes of commercials, 10 minutes of movie, 5 minutes of commercials. It's beginning to feel like "we interrupt this commercial to bring you the show". I remember when channels like AMC and IFC ran movies with one or two commercials, half way in the movie. These are just as bad as the rest of them now, 45 minutes to an hour worth of commercials! The networks are having to extend the time slots or cut out huge portions of the movies!

    There doesn't seem to be anyway of getting around the bombardment of advertising and commercials in EVERY facet of media, including those dam internet banner and pop up ads. The networks charge the ISP's more and more, threaten blackouts and all the networks do now is pay for more commercials and pass that cost onto the subscriber.

    By now, I am sure everyone has heard about "subliminal messages" in TV commercials, horrible icon_evil.gif


    TV networks load up on commercials
    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-nielsen-advertising-study-20140510-story.html

    "Commercial Creep"—I Hate Commercials and You Should Too
    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-media-zone/201302/commercial-creep-i-hate-commercials-and-you-should-too


    Commercial Creep Strategies

    1. Bunching commercials in the last segment while you’re waiting for the climax or epilogue: One of the most brazen forms of holding the viewer hostage occurs, once again, on Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show. At the end of his nightly guest interview, Stewart says, “We’ll be right back.” Then he leans over and says some unheard words to the guest who has to lean in to catch Stewart’s words—whatever those secret, cool words are—as the visual moves to a 30 or 60 second commercial intrusion. Stewart returns and smiles, “That’s our show,” and signs off. Roll Credits. You hung in for what?

    2. To lard on even more commercial spots (after a four minute commercial break) and at the same time avoid audience rebellion, show hosts like Rachel Maddow, appear for 20 seconds, quickly re-repeat what’s coming up (it’s called a teaser). Then another round of commercials unspools. You’ve just watched five almost solid minutes of commercials but the 20 second teaser made it feel like it was just a really quick commercial break. Nifty, eh?

    3. The Mach 2 Trick, creating more commercial time by having the actors speed-talk: This trickery seemed to originate with creator/writer Aaron Sorkin on his popular political series, The West Wing. NBC wanted more commercials. Sorkin had two choices: write less or have the actors talk faster. Since Sorkin’s characters always have a lot to say, he chose the latter. The networks added several advertising minutes, no one’s the wiser… well, except for those whose word processing aptitude is shot because of age or infirmity: “What’s he saying, Martha? I can’t understand what they’re saying anymore. I’m buying a German hearing aid next time.”

    4. Castrating Content: Generally, movies have more ads than reruns of TV series. Why? In movies like The Matrix whole sections of a story line can be snipped without noticeable narrative damage. It is harder to make time for commercial breaks in short, plot-heavy reruns of The Good Wife because it is so easy to do noticeable damage to program coherence and continuity.




  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 04, 2015 1:18 PM GMT
    Where I dislike commercials most is during the evening network news programs. Out of a 27-minute newscast, about 10 minutes are commercials. And the news itself is further diminished by wordy intros from the anchor, and then more empty lead-in to the story by the reporter. Just give us the goddam news, not all this filler.

    Of course all this makes for more network revenue. Directly from the advertisers, naturally, but also indirectly by reducing their on-air production costs. The fewer stories they cover, and the shorter they are, the more they save in expensive field production costs. It's cheaper to have their on-air talent gabbing at the camera than to be trying to capture and then edit the actual live news from the scene.

    The other place commercials are a pain is the online news on my computer. I prefer to read the stories myself, not see the same kind of video I dislike from network TV. But increasingly video is all you're offered.

    A clip that starts with a 30-second commercial you often can't skip or mute, the controls being disabled. Fortunately my computer's own sound volume can be controlled conveniently from my keyboard with dedicated keys. With the result that if I find a story is video only I usually avoid the whole thing.

    Therefore missing the advertiser's expensive commercial, while I look for the story elsewhere in print form. No loss, the video was probably done by an airhead reporter and gives me less info than if I read it myself from text. My only regret is that I probably gave the news organization a "hit" count increase they can use to entice advertisers to air even more commercials with them at higher rates for more revenue.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14354

    Oct 04, 2015 1:38 PM GMT
    Unfortunately advertising is a necessary evil and becoming much more necessary as operating costs rapidly skyrocket in network television and in all other forms of media. Advertising is operating revenue and the pressure is on to squeeze even higher profit margins .
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    Oct 04, 2015 2:15 PM GMT
    I'm with you. I stopped watching TV altogether and I have ad block pro in all my browsers, which helps a bit. It's getting so every surface that will hold one has a print ad, too. The sides of buses, inside bathroom stalls... somewhere I was recently had displays showing ads on the gas pump since you're a captive audience.

    I said half-kiddingly they're going to figure out a way to project a hologram between the blinds of your bedroom and show ads on your ceiling when you're trying to sleep... hopefully nobody heard me or they'd be busily trying to invent it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 04, 2015 4:33 PM GMT
    Info-mmercials...commercial's...advertisements, sell the Networks free programming. Allows the subscriber to get better rates and cheaper viewing. Live with it!
  • Muscmasmat

    Posts: 124

    Oct 04, 2015 7:19 PM GMT
    That amount of commercials, even in football games now, has greatly increased over the last few years and gets worse each year. I now record almost everything I watch, so I can zoom through the commercials. For live TV, I just record a show and watch it later. For series I watch all the time, I set them up for recording, and never watch them live. Even for football games, I now start the recording, postpone my viewing by about 30 minutes, and then start watching the recorded game, zooming through the commercials. You just have to make sure you extend the recording time in case the game goes long.

    This process works especially well with movies on TV.

    I do pay extra per month for the HD recorder, but it comes with the HD upgrade, so it is not that much more and saves my sanity.

    I have noticed lately that when I zoom through the commercials on the recorded TV, it has become more difficult to stop at the exact point you want. I think the cable company has made it so it resets back a bit so you have to watch the last commercial.
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Oct 04, 2015 8:49 PM GMT
    Advertisements are the bane of modern life.
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    Oct 04, 2015 9:14 PM GMT




    How the fuck do you "speed up" The Wizard Of Oz without ruining it?

    Hollywood's greatest movie gets chopped during holidays? I prefer the "old" DVD rental at Blockbuster, at least you get the whole movie when you rented, oh but wait, I cant get DVD's anymore because network technology put these people out of business. I am sure glad I have seen Wizard Of Oz, commercial free many times and on the big screen before squeezing these advertisements in. Networks must have a chopping field day with really long movies like James Cameron's Titanic icon_evil.gif



    Cable networks are speeding up TV shows to cram in ads
    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/cable-networks-are-speeding-up-tv-shows-to-cram-in-ads/


    The networks that are using compression technology to speed up their shows include Time Warner's (TWX) TBS, which sped up "The Wizard of Oz" last November and used the technology on repeats of "Seinfeld," according to the Journal (To see a comparison of two "Seinfeld" clips, one normal speed and the other at the faster rate, click here.) Viacom's (VIA) TV Land has also used the same strategy with "Friends" repeats.

    Cable networks are also using strategies such as cutting down opening credits to make more time for ads.

    The sped-up TV shows are emerging as cable-advertising sales encountered headwinds last year, thanks to lower ratings. With cable networks trying to squeeze more money out of every hour, that's caused a sharp ramp-up in commercial minutes.

    Five years ago, the average commercial time on cable TV was 14.5 minutes, but that reached 15.8 minutes last year, according to data from Nielsen cited by The Journal.

    Viewers are also seeing more ads because cable networks are selling more shorter spots, with a surge in the number of 15-second commercials at the expense of 30-second ads. That switch in the mix of ad lengths and longer commercial breaks overall means that cable networks are reaping more in advertising revenue, even though the cost of a 30-second spot in primetime declined from 2009 to 2013

    What that boils down to is that consumers, many of whom are suffering from stagnant wages, are paying much more for cable service than ever before. At the same time, they are effectively being asked to sit through the indignities of sped-up dialogue and increasingly long ad breaks.

    It's no wonder that "cord-cutting" is now a verb. With the pay TV industry shedding about 179,000 customers in the third quarter alone, it's now become what should be a worrying trend for the cable networks and providers


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    Oct 04, 2015 10:37 PM GMT
    I agree that they are frustrating. The worst is when you want to show someone a quick youtube clip of a video for a song, or a funny clip and you have to sit through a 30 second ad just to see the clip. However, I will say that there are several products where I saw an ad and then purchased it. Axe White underarm deodorant spray Whataburger's Honey Chicken Biscuit and Silk's Almond milk are examples. So while it's annoying, it is kind of a necessary evil for those of us who are employed by those companies who rely on customers to buy products.

    What frustrates me is the length of the commercials as well as the repetition of the same commercial. Sometimes when I'm watching a show, the same commercial will come on 3 times in a row. That's not doing that advertiser any good.

  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1277

    Oct 05, 2015 3:14 AM GMT
    Lincsbear saidAdvertisements are the bane of modern life.


    I watch very little TV anymore. My pet peeve is how movie theaters show television commercials before the previews. Even the movie going experience has been ruined.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Oct 05, 2015 6:21 AM GMT
    ELNathB saidI finally decided to watch some weekend movies or shows on ATT Uverse. I am absolutely shocked and appalled at the amount of cable and network commercials. I don't have any premium movie channels so I get stuck with, in my pay tier, USA, TNT, Spike, SyFy, Logo ...etc. I do have Netflix instead of those premium to help keep ISP cost down, even if they have crap for movies, at least their is no commercials when watching them. On-line Hulu, TV and movies is incredibly bombarded with tons of commercial too. Of course You Tube now has at least one commercial before watching video and some have multiple "stops" for several advertisements.

    The standard cable channel 90 minute run movie (1.5 hour) now takes 2 to 2.5 hours to watch and a solid 120 min movie (2 hour) now takes 2.5 to 3 hours to watch. 10 minutes of movie, 5 minutes of commercials, 10 minutes of movie, 5 minutes of commercials. It's beginning to feel like "we interrupt this commercial to bring you the show". I remember when channels like AMC and IFC ran movies with one or two commercials, half way in the movie. These are just as bad as the rest of them now, 45 minutes to an hour worth of commercials! The networks are having to extend the time slots or cut out huge portions of the movies!

    There doesn't seem to be anyway of getting around the bombardment of advertising and commercials in EVERY facet of media, including those dam internet banner and pop up ads. The networks charge the ISP's more and more, threaten blackouts and all the networks do now is pay for more commercials and pass that cost onto the subscriber.

    By now, I am sure everyone has heard about "subliminal messages" in TV commercials, horrible icon_evil.gif


    TV networks load up on commercials
    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-nielsen-advertising-study-20140510-story.html

    "Commercial Creep"—I Hate Commercials and You Should Too
    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-media-zone/201302/commercial-creep-i-hate-commercials-and-you-should-too


    Commercial Creep Strategies

    1. Bunching commercials in the last segment while you’re waiting for the climax or epilogue: One of the most brazen forms of holding the viewer hostage occurs, once again, on Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show. At the end of his nightly guest interview, Stewart says, “We’ll be right back.” Then he leans over and says some unheard words to the guest who has to lean in to catch Stewart’s words—whatever those secret, cool words are—as the visual moves to a 30 or 60 second commercial intrusion. Stewart returns and smiles, “That’s our show,” and signs off. Roll Credits. You hung in for what?

    2. To lard on even more commercial spots (after a four minute commercial break) and at the same time avoid audience rebellion, show hosts like Rachel Maddow, appear for 20 seconds, quickly re-repeat what’s coming up (it’s called a teaser). Then another round of commercials unspools. You’ve just watched five almost solid minutes of commercials but the 20 second teaser made it feel like it was just a really quick commercial break. Nifty, eh?

    3. The Mach 2 Trick, creating more commercial time by having the actors speed-talk: This trickery seemed to originate with creator/writer Aaron Sorkin on his popular political series, The West Wing. NBC wanted more commercials. Sorkin had two choices: write less or have the actors talk faster. Since Sorkin’s characters always have a lot to say, he chose the latter. The networks added several advertising minutes, no one’s the wiser… well, except for those whose word processing aptitude is shot because of age or infirmity: “What’s he saying, Martha? I can’t understand what they’re saying anymore. I’m buying a German hearing aid next time.”

    4. Castrating Content: Generally, movies have more ads than reruns of TV series. Why? In movies like The Matrix whole sections of a story line can be snipped without noticeable narrative damage. It is harder to make time for commercial breaks in short, plot-heavy reruns of The Good Wife because it is so easy to do noticeable damage to program coherence and continuity.



    It seems to me that since one has to pay for cable TV there should be NO commercials. I don't have cable; my roof-top antenna provides perfect reception and enough channels. However, I sometimes turn off the TV when I become disgusted with having to waste time watching senseless commercials.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Oct 05, 2015 6:29 AM GMT
    Art_Deco saidWhere I dislike commercials most is during the evening network news programs. Out of a 27-minute newscast, about 10 minutes are commercials. And the news itself is further diminished by wordy intros from the anchor, and then more empty lead-in to the story by the reporter. Just give us the goddam news, not all this filler.

    Of course all this makes for more network revenue. Directly from the advertisers, naturally, but also indirectly by reducing their on-air production costs. The fewer stories they cover, and the shorter they are, the more they save in expensive field production costs. It's cheaper to have their on-air talent gabbing at the camera than to be trying to capture and then edit the actual live news from the scene.

    The other place commercials are a pain is the online news on my computer. I prefer to read the stories myself, not see the same kind of video I dislike from network TV. But increasingly video is all you're offered.

    A clip that starts with a 30-second commercial you often can't skip or mute, the controls being disabled. Fortunately my computer's own sound volume can be controlled conveniently from my keyboard with dedicated keys. With the result that if I find a story is video only I usually avoid the whole thing.

    Therefore missing the advertiser's expensive commercial, while I look for the story elsewhere in print form. No loss, the video was probably done by an airhead reporter and gives me less info than if I read it myself from text. My only regret is that I probably gave the news organization a "hit" count increase they can use to entice advertisers to air even more commercials with them at higher rates for more revenue.


    On the Internet, CNN articles almost always include a video which I do not want to watch. It's a real problem if one loads several pages before reading them. All I can do is turn off the sound. AlJazera, when it has videos, makes them optional; you don't have to click to see the video if you don't want to.

    The news also includes too much trivia. They repeat the same story, with very minor additions, over and over ad nauseam. Channels also spend considerable time advertising themselves and talk about how great they are and how many prizes their stories have got for them.

    I guess the solution is to accept being less well-informed and read books instead.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Oct 05, 2015 6:31 AM GMT
    ShiftyJK08 saidI'm with you. I stopped watching TV altogether and I have ad block pro in all my browsers, which helps a bit. It's getting so every surface that will hold one has a print ad, too. The sides of buses, inside bathroom stalls... somewhere I was recently had displays showing ads on the gas pump since you're a captive audience.

    I said half-kiddingly they're going to figure out a way to project a hologram between the blinds of your bedroom and show ads on your ceiling when you're trying to sleep... hopefully nobody heard me or they'd be busily trying to invent it.


    I know several people who don't have TV at all. It seems to be a growing trend.

    TV used to be called the boob tube but now that a picture tube is no longer used we'll have to find something else to call it.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Oct 05, 2015 6:39 AM GMT
    woodfordr saidI agree that they are frustrating. The worst is when you want to show someone a quick youtube clip of a video for a song, or a funny clip and you have to sit through a 30 second ad just to see the clip. However, I will say that there are several products where I saw an ad and then purchased it. Axe White underarm deodorant spray Whataburger's Honey Chicken Biscuit and Silk's Almond milk are examples. So while it's annoying, it is kind of a necessary evil for those of us who are employed by those companies who rely on customers to buy products.

    What frustrates me is the length of the commercials as well as the repetition of the same commercial. Sometimes when I'm watching a show, the same commercial will come on 3 times in a row. That's not doing that advertiser any good.



    I can't think of a single thing I've purchased as the result of a TV ad. I'm more likely to avoid purchasing something if the ad is stupid or annoying. For example, I surely will not by insurance from a company that uses a talking lizard in ads. When I changed insurance companies about a year ago I didn't not even get quotations from the company that has the talking lizard ads.

    The ads for car insurance are stupid anyway. One can get lower rates by bundling insurance, i.e., by having one's home and vehicles insured by the same company. When visiting an insurance agent, it can easily take half an hour for them to process a quotation yet the TV ads would have one think that they can get all the information in a couple minutes. But when you include a house, they need the roof type, square footage, distance from the fire station, whether you have a fireplace, etc. etc. etc., plus your credit rating, and it takes time to process all that information.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Oct 05, 2015 6:42 AM GMT
    ChicagoSteve said
    Lincsbear saidAdvertisements are the bane of modern life.


    I watch very little TV anymore. My pet peeve is how movie theaters show television commercials before the previews. Even the movie going experience has been ruined.


    It's been a few years since I've seen a movie. In the last 10 years I may have seen as many as three movies.
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Oct 05, 2015 2:42 PM GMT
    when I was a kid in New Jersey (New York TV) we had channels 2 (CBS), 4 (NBC), 5 (local), 7 (ABC), 9 (local/Mets), 11 (local/Yankees) and 13 (PBS) of relatively sorta decent stuff

    then came cable with MTV, CNN and the Rangers and Knicks on cable

    now we have 500 channels of mostly crap
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14354

    Oct 05, 2015 11:52 PM GMT
    I haven't owned a television set for almost ten years and evidently I am not missing anything.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 06, 2015 12:16 AM GMT
    I have one for mostly Velocity and tornado warnings.

    I'd much prefer to listen to music. And we all know how 'pure as the driven snow' those old lyrics are.