Relocating from AZ to NY with my dog, any suggestions?

  • prototype

    Posts: 194

    Oct 07, 2015 3:41 AM GMT
    Well after a year of Phoenix, it's on to Syracuse, NY! Pretty excited to be moving a lot and seeing different parts of the country but now I'll need some help.

    I'll be driving with my dog (Chewy) to my destination and all I know is that I'm headed to Syracuse by Interstate 44, 90, etc East but don't much about the traveling part.

    So if anyone has tips on where to stay, in which city, or traveling with a dog, really anything it's all good advice. Thanks!

    Chris
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    Oct 07, 2015 3:52 AM GMT
    prototype saidWell after a year of Phoenix, it's on to Syracuse, NY! Pretty excited to be moving a lot and seeing different parts of the country but now I'll need some help.

    I'll be driving with my dog (Chewy) to my destination and all I know is that I'm headed to Syracuse by Interstate 44, 90, etc East but don't much about the traveling part.

    So if anyone has tips on where to stay, in which city, or traveling with a dog, really anything it's all good advice. Thanks!

    Chris


    There's a major hotel chain (I think it's Westin) whose properties almost without exception welcomes dogs under 40 pounds. Their Aloft brand is cool and has a special program for dogs, but there aren't that many of them.

    I would do that homework and figure out how far you expect to get each day and not leave to chance that you'll find a place that will welcome Chewy when you're exhausted and can't drive safely anymore. There are directories of pet-friendly hotels available, and the Google Maps app has come a long way with helping you anticipate what kind of traffic you'll encounter at different times of day, tolls ,etc. On our last wrong trip it redirected us onto an unfamiliar highway which we learned later helped us miss 90 minutes of traffic.

    I used to be more familiar with some of the cities you'll pass near/through but I haven't traveled for my job for a while. I Do remember that many city centers in the midwest (Indy, Columbus, etc.) are somewhat deserted at night with more activity around the perimeter highways, but I'm not sure from your OP if you intend to sightsee a bit or just sleep and keep driving.
  • prototype

    Posts: 194

    Oct 07, 2015 3:57 AM GMT
    Sadly no but I only have a few boxes and everything will fit in the trunk. My dog is elderly and the furthest I've traveled with her is 600 miles so not sure how she is gonna feel about traveling 4 days.

    She likes to travel and she has the whole backseat to herself.
  • prototype

    Posts: 194

    Oct 07, 2015 4:00 AM GMT
    ShiftyJK08 said
    prototype saidWell after a year of Phoenix, it's on to Syracuse, NY! Pretty excited to be moving a lot and seeing different parts of the country but now I'll need some help.

    I'll be driving with my dog (Chewy) to my destination and all I know is that I'm headed to Syracuse by Interstate 44, 90, etc East but don't much about the traveling part.

    So if anyone has tips on where to stay, in which city, or traveling with a dog, really anything it's all good advice. Thanks!

    Chris


    There's a major hotel chain (I think it's Westin) whose properties almost without exception welcomes dogs under 40 pounds. Their Aloft brand is cool and has a special program for dogs, but there aren't that many of them.

    I would do that homework and figure out how far you expect to get each day and not leave to chance that you'll find a place that will welcome Chewy when you're exhausted and can't drive safely anymore. There are directories of pet-friendly hotels available, and the Google Maps app has come a long way with helping you anticipate what kind of traffic you'll encounter at different times of day, tolls ,etc. On our last wrong trip it redirected us onto an unfamiliar highway which we learned later helped us miss 90 minutes of traffic.

    I used to be more familiar with some of the cities you'll pass near/through but I haven't traveled for my job for a while. I Do remember that many city centers in the midwest (Indy, Columbus, etc.) are somewhat deserted at night with more activity around the perimeter highways, but I'm not sure from your OP if you intend to sightsee a bit or just sleep and keep driving.



    Oh man thanks! Yeah I will check out Westin! And you're right I don't want to end up in a bad situation. I think i may because hey sometimes it happens but didn't think about it. Thank you.

    For the most part, just stopping at rest stops, I'm really just trying to get to here from there, but you never know I may wander a bit! Cheers!
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    Oct 07, 2015 7:11 PM GMT
    Although not as nice as the Westin, Red Roof Inns are very pet friendly.
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    Oct 07, 2015 7:40 PM GMT
    prototype saidWell after a year of Phoenix, it's on to Syracuse, NY! Pretty excited to be moving a lot and seeing different parts of the country but now I'll need some help.

    I'll be driving with my dog (Chewy) to my destination and all I know is that I'm headed to Syracuse by Interstate 44, 90, etc East but don't much about the traveling part.

    So if anyone has tips on where to stay, in which city, or traveling with a dog, really anything it's all good advice. Thanks!

    Chris


    I made some similar suggestions to Paul in

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/4114207

    Whatever you do avoid I-44. Talk about a boring drive!!!

    In fact, get off of the interstates until you get east of the Continental Divide where there's nothing to see anyway.

    Head north on I-17 to Fagstaff and then Grand Canyon then st rt 64 over to Cameron and then st rt 89 north to Zion NP and then on to Bryce.

    I was through there many many times with my dog, Prince. He loved Sunrise Point in Bryce when he was a pup, so appropriately, after he passed, his ashes were spread at Sunset Point in Bryce. He loved that place and so do I.

    Stay at Ruby's Best Western in Bryce at the entrance to the park.

    You might add a day to your trip, but it's hugely worth it, and if you won't do it for yourself, do it for your dog. It's a stunning trip at this time of the year. And besides, while traveling long distances with dogs, they need to get out and get exercise. What wonderful places to do it.

    This is what you'll miss if you go interstates.



    However, this was going east to west. You'd see this backwards.
  • prototype

    Posts: 194

    Oct 07, 2015 8:28 PM GMT
    Radd saidAlthough not as nice as the Westin, Red Roof Inns are very pet friendly.


    Yeah the westin is very nice but red roof is more my budget. Also I won't be in my room a long time just to sleep so yeah red roof it is!
  • prototype

    Posts: 194

    Oct 07, 2015 8:29 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    prototype saidWell after a year of Phoenix, it's on to Syracuse, NY! Pretty excited to be moving a lot and seeing different parts of the country but now I'll need some help.

    I'll be driving with my dog (Chewy) to my destination and all I know is that I'm headed to Syracuse by Interstate 44, 90, etc East but don't much about the traveling part.

    So if anyone has tips on where to stay, in which city, or traveling with a dog, really anything it's all good advice. Thanks!

    Chris


    I made some similar suggestions to Paul in

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/4114207

    Whatever you do avoid I-44. Talk about a boring drive!!!

    In fact, get off of the interstates until you get east of the Continental Divide where there's nothing to see anyway.

    Head north on I-17 to Fagstaff and then Grand Canyon then st rt 64 over to Cameron and then st rt 89 north to Zion NP and then on to Bryce.

    I was through there many many times with my dog, Prince. He loved Sunrise Point in Bryce when he was a pup, so appropriately, after he passed, his ashes were spread at Sunset Point in Bryce. He loved that place and so do I.

    Stay at Ruby's Best Western in Bryce at the entrance to the park.

    You might add a day to your trip, but it's hugely worth it, and if you won't do it for yourself, do it for your dog. It's a stunning trip at this time of the year. And besides, while traveling long distances with dogs, they need to get out and get exercise. What wonderful places to do it.

    This is what you'll miss if you go interstates.



    However, this was going east to west. You'd see this backwards.


    Yeah I'll actually be leaving from flagstaff after visiting my family so possibility. I can't wait to watch the video.
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    Oct 07, 2015 8:55 PM GMT
    prototype said
    freedomisntfree said
    prototype saidWell after a year of Phoenix, it's on to Syracuse, NY! Pretty excited to be moving a lot and seeing different parts of the country but now I'll need some help.

    I'll be driving with my dog (Chewy) to my destination and all I know is that I'm headed to Syracuse by Interstate 44, 90, etc East but don't much about the traveling part.

    So if anyone has tips on where to stay, in which city, or traveling with a dog, really anything it's all good advice. Thanks!

    Chris


    I made some similar suggestions to Paul in

    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/4114207

    Whatever you do avoid I-44. Talk about a boring drive!!!

    In fact, get off of the interstates until you get east of the Continental Divide where there's nothing to see anyway.

    Head north on I-17 to Fagstaff and then Grand Canyon then st rt 64 over to Cameron and then st rt 89 north to Zion NP and then on to Bryce.

    I was through there many many times with my dog, Prince. He loved Sunrise Point in Bryce when he was a pup, so appropriately, after he passed, his ashes were spread at Sunset Point in Bryce. He loved that place and so do I.

    Stay at Ruby's Best Western in Bryce at the entrance to the park.

    You might add a day to your trip, but it's hugely worth it, and if you won't do it for yourself, do it for your dog. It's a stunning trip at this time of the year. And besides, while traveling long distances with dogs, they need to get out and get exercise. What wonderful places to do it.

    This is what you'll miss if you go interstates.



    However, this was going east to west. You'd see this backwards.


    Yeah I'll actually be leaving from flagstaff after visiting my family so possibility. I can't wait to watch the video.


    Go to my youtube page to watch in HD.

    I've long lost count, but I've done 45+ of these trips starting in 1971. I think I know exactly where to send you.

    The two lanes are in much better shape than the interstates, and in areas, you can REALLY go fast if you're into that sort of thing. No cops, no traffic at this time of year. Just you and your dog.

    You won't see anything like this on I-44

    photo b1a04baf-1e10-4a04-b35f-89f5fce138a8.jpg

    And you can't drive like this on the interstates

    photo f733d4eb-580f-49f8-bdaa-6002719f85e3.jpg
  • FitBlackCuddl...

    Posts: 803

    Oct 07, 2015 9:57 PM GMT
    "Relocating from AZ to NY with my dog, any suggestions?"

    Hold up a few AZ liquor stores and convenience stores before you leave. New York is going to cost you!!
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14395

    Oct 07, 2015 10:03 PM GMT
    prototype saidWell after a year of Phoenix, it's on to Syracuse, NY! Pretty excited to be moving a lot and seeing different parts of the country but now I'll need some help.

    I'll be driving with my dog (Chewy) to my destination and all I know is that I'm headed to Syracuse by Interstate 44, 90, etc East but don't much about the traveling part.

    So if anyone has tips on where to stay, in which city, or traveling with a dog, really anything it's all good advice. Thanks!

    Chris
    Your best bet is to follow I-40 east all the way to Knoxville and just east of Knoxville pick up I-81 and you are on your way to Syracuse. I-81 is the north south artery through Syracuse.
  • Guido4real69

    Posts: 87

    Oct 07, 2015 10:07 PM GMT
    FitBlackCuddler said"Relocating from AZ to NY with my dog, any suggestions?"

    Hold up a few AZ liquor stores and convenience stores before you leave. New York is going to cost you!!
    the truth ! New York really does suck .
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    Oct 07, 2015 10:14 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    prototype saidWell after a year of Phoenix, it's on to Syracuse, NY! Pretty excited to be moving a lot and seeing different parts of the country but now I'll need some help.

    I'll be driving with my dog (Chewy) to my destination and all I know is that I'm headed to Syracuse by Interstate 44, 90, etc East but don't much about the traveling part.

    So if anyone has tips on where to stay, in which city, or traveling with a dog, really anything it's all good advice. Thanks!

    Chris
    Your best bet is to follow I-40 east all the way to Knoxville and just east of Knoxville pick up I-81 and you are on your way to Syracuse. I-81 is the north south artery through Syracuse.


    "Your best bet is to follow I-40 east all the way to Knoxville "

    Absolute worst way to go. 40 is in abysmal shape due to truck traffic and nothing to see except right around flagstaff. Stay OFF the interstates until you're east of the Rockies and then it doesn't much matter.

    After Rocky Mountain NP, I'd pick up I-76 east of Denver up to I-80 and take I-80 the rest of the way across.
  • Flrunner

    Posts: 26

    Oct 08, 2015 12:56 AM GMT
    prototype saidSadly no but I only have a few boxes and everything will fit in the trunk. My dog is elderly and the furthest I've traveled with her is 600 miles so not sure how she is gonna feel about traveling 4 days.

    She likes to travel and she has the whole backseat to herself.

    You and the dog will be fine. I have moved a lot with my dog and he is 12 now. Just make sure he has plenty of room in the back seat and stop every 2 to 3 hours and walk around. I have traveled through a lot of that region and this time of year is very beautiful.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14395

    Oct 08, 2015 1:40 AM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob said
    prototype saidWell after a year of Phoenix, it's on to Syracuse, NY! Pretty excited to be moving a lot and seeing different parts of the country but now I'll need some help.

    I'll be driving with my dog (Chewy) to my destination and all I know is that I'm headed to Syracuse by Interstate 44, 90, etc East but don't much about the traveling part.

    So if anyone has tips on where to stay, in which city, or traveling with a dog, really anything it's all good advice. Thanks!

    Chris
    Your best bet is to follow I-40 east all the way to Knoxville and just east of Knoxville pick up I-81 and you are on your way to Syracuse. I-81 is the north south artery through Syracuse.


    "Your best bet is to follow I-40 east all the way to Knoxville "

    Absolute worst way to go. 40 is in abysmal shape due to truck traffic and nothing to see except right around flagstaff. Stay OFF the interstates until you're east of the Rockies and then it doesn't much matter.

    After Rocky Mountain NP, I'd pick up I-76 east of Denver up to I-80 and take I-80 the rest of the way across.
    I-40 through Western Arkansas is beautiful and hilly. Eastern Arkansas is flat rice country. I-40 in Tennessee is pretty scenic and in good pavement condition. Both Little Rock and Nashville are beautiful, southern cities. Knoxville is also a nice place overall. I-81 from I-40 east of Knoxville is a wonderful, scenic route that goes through the rugged, jagged mountains of Western Virginia and across the Shanendoah Valley up into West Virginia, Maryland, and into Pennsylvania. North of Harrisburg, I-81 will start to get very hilly especially near Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, and Binghamton. US Highway Route 11 runs closely parallel to I-81 for most of its length. From Binghamton north to Syracuse, I-81 will be somewhat hilly but not rugged like in Pennsylvania and Western Virginia.

    You talk about roads that are deteriorated and loaded with heavy trucks, I-80 is the absolute worst of them all especially across Northern Illinois and Northwest Indiana. Omaha NE is also a major choke point for trucks, congestion, and rough pavement on I-80. Avoid I-80 entirely.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14395

    Oct 08, 2015 2:12 AM GMT
    robbaker saidavoid the ghetto at all cost. it's like the walking dead but 10xworst!icon_mad.gif
    Hey meathead, he is moving to Syracuse not to New York City.
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    Oct 08, 2015 3:56 AM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob said
    prototype saidWell after a year of Phoenix, it's on to Syracuse, NY! Pretty excited to be moving a lot and seeing different parts of the country but now I'll need some help.

    I'll be driving with my dog (Chewy) to my destination and all I know is that I'm headed to Syracuse by Interstate 44, 90, etc East but don't much about the traveling part.

    So if anyone has tips on where to stay, in which city, or traveling with a dog, really anything it's all good advice. Thanks!

    Chris
    Your best bet is to follow I-40 east all the way to Knoxville and just east of Knoxville pick up I-81 and you are on your way to Syracuse. I-81 is the north south artery through Syracuse.


    "Your best bet is to follow I-40 east all the way to Knoxville "

    Absolute worst way to go. 40 is in abysmal shape due to truck traffic and nothing to see except right around flagstaff. Stay OFF the interstates until you're east of the Rockies and then it doesn't much matter.

    After Rocky Mountain NP, I'd pick up I-76 east of Denver up to I-80 and take I-80 the rest of the way across.
    I-40 through Western Arkansas is beautiful and hilly. Eastern Arkansas is flat rice country. I-40 in Tennessee is pretty scenic and in good pavement condition. Both Little Rock and Nashville are beautiful, southern cities. Knoxville is also a nice place overall. I-81 from I-40 east of Knoxville is a wonderful, scenic route that goes through the rugged, jagged mountains of Western Virginia and across the Shanendoah Valley up into West Virginia, Maryland, and into Pennsylvania. North of Harrisburg, I-81 will start to get very hilly especially near Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, and Binghamton. US Highway Route 11 runs closely parallel to I-81 for most of its length. From Binghamton north to Syracuse, I-81 will be somewhat hilly but not rugged like in Pennsylvania and Western Virginia.

    You talk about roads that are deteriorated and loaded with heavy trucks, I-80 is the absolute worst of them all especially across Northern Illinois and Northwest Indiana. Omaha NE is also a major choke point for trucks, congestion, and rough pavement on I-80. Avoid I-80 entirely.


    I'm talking about from the front range west or sorta I-25 and west. East of that it doesn't matter much to me. Heading east I have gone I-40 to I-44 to I-70 to Columbus. Not a great drive.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14395

    Oct 09, 2015 3:33 AM GMT
    Yeah but he is heading east not west. I am trying to suggest a major route with the least heavy traffic and least stress. I-40 seems to fill the bill in that regard. With the exception of Albuquerque and Memphis, most of I-40 will be relatively free of nerve wracking rush hours and traffic tie ups. Oklahoma City, Little Rock, Nashville, and Knoxville are not overly large so their traffic shouldn't pose much of a problem. I-81 north all the way from I-40 east of Knoxville to Syracuse is primarily small town and rural for almost all of its length. Hagerstown, Harrisburg, Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, and Binghamton are all good sized cities but not big enough to create nerve wracking rush hours which makes traveling I-81 a real pleasure. I-81 also traverses scenic mountain areas and valleys for most of its length.
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    Oct 09, 2015 3:42 AM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidYeah but he is heading east not west. I am trying to suggest a major route with the least heavy traffic and least stress. I-40 seems to fill the bill in that regard. With the exception of Albuquerque and Memphis, most of I-40 will be relatively free of nerve wracking rush hours and traffic tie ups. Oklahoma City, Little Rock, Nashville, and Knoxville are not overly large so their traffic shouldn't pose much of a problem. I-81 north all the way from I-40 east of Knoxville to Syracuse is primarily small town and rural for almost all of its length. Hagerstown, Harrisburg, Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, and Binghamton are all good sized cities but not big enough to create nerve wracking rush hours which makes traveling I-81 a real pleasure. I-81 also traverses scenic mountain areas and valleys for most of its length.


    "Yeah but he is heading east not west"

    Understood.

    I'm trying to get him to visit color country in southern Utah (Zion, Bryce, Escalate, Capital Reef, rt. 95 between Hanksville and Blanding, Natural Bridges, Canyonlands, Arches, Moab, rt. 128 between Moab and I-70, and then whatever for east of the Rockies on back to NY.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14395

    Oct 09, 2015 1:31 PM GMT
    whitewater said
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob saidYeah but he is heading east not west. I am trying to suggest a major route with the least heavy traffic and least stress. I-40 seems to fill the bill in that regard. With the exception of Albuquerque and Memphis, most of I-40 will be relatively free of nerve wracking rush hours and traffic tie ups. Oklahoma City, Little Rock, Nashville, and Knoxville are not overly large so their traffic shouldn't pose much of a problem. I-81 north all the way from I-40 east of Knoxville to Syracuse is primarily small town and rural for almost all of its length. Hagerstown, Harrisburg, Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, and Binghamton are all good sized cities but not big enough to create nerve wracking rush hours which makes traveling I-81 a real pleasure. I-81 also traverses scenic mountain areas and valleys for most of its length.


    "Yeah but he is heading east not west"

    Understood.

    I'm trying to get him to visit color country in southern Utah (Zion, Bryce, Escalate, Capital Reef, rt. 95 between Hanksville and Blanding, Natural Bridges, Canyonlands, Arches, Moab, rt. 128 between Moab and I-70, and then whatever for east of the Rockies on back to NY.


    If there is no snow for when he is leaving then he can go from SE Utah and then over the high passes of Western Colorado before heading down to Denver. With the fall colours that would be an awesome tripicon_biggrin.gif
    Sorry guys but he is not looking for a scenic tour through the Rockies, he is looking for a direct, stress free highway route from Phoenix to Syracuse and the best route would be I-40 east to Knoxville and than I-81 north to Syracuse. He is moving to a different city and state and he has an elderly dog going with him. Long distance car trips can become quite stressful for animals especially when the animal is older. So he has to keep the well being of his furry friend in serious consideration at all times. There is a lot of beautiful, rugged mountain scenery along I-81 in Virginia and Pennsylvania. Trust me on this guys.
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    Oct 09, 2015 3:04 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    whitewater said
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob saidYeah but he is heading east not west. I am trying to suggest a major route with the least heavy traffic and least stress. I-40 seems to fill the bill in that regard. With the exception of Albuquerque and Memphis, most of I-40 will be relatively free of nerve wracking rush hours and traffic tie ups. Oklahoma City, Little Rock, Nashville, and Knoxville are not overly large so their traffic shouldn't pose much of a problem. I-81 north all the way from I-40 east of Knoxville to Syracuse is primarily small town and rural for almost all of its length. Hagerstown, Harrisburg, Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, and Binghamton are all good sized cities but not big enough to create nerve wracking rush hours which makes traveling I-81 a real pleasure. I-81 also traverses scenic mountain areas and valleys for most of its length.


    "Yeah but he is heading east not west"

    Understood.

    I'm trying to get him to visit color country in southern Utah (Zion, Bryce, Escalate, Capital Reef, rt. 95 between Hanksville and Blanding, Natural Bridges, Canyonlands, Arches, Moab, rt. 128 between Moab and I-70, and then whatever for east of the Rockies on back to NY.


    If there is no snow for when he is leaving then he can go from SE Utah and then over the high passes of Western Colorado before heading down to Denver. With the fall colours that would be an awesome tripicon_biggrin.gif
    Sorry guys but he is not looking for a scenic tour through the Rockies, he is looking for a direct, stress free highway route from Phoenix to Syracuse and the best route would be I-40 east to Knoxville and than I-81 north to Syracuse. He is moving to a different city and state and he has an elderly dog going with him. Long distance car trips can become quite stressful for animals especially when the animal is older. So he has to keep the well being of his furry friend in serious consideration at all times. There is a lot of beautiful, rugged mountain scenery along I-81 in Virginia and Pennsylvania. Trust me on this guys.


    "Sorry guys but he is not looking for a scenic tour through the Rockies,"

    He may not be looking for a scenic tour through the Appalachians either.

    And I'm suggestion an alternative.

    However, IMO, the best thing to do is

    1) enjoy the trip as much as possible since you have to do it anyway.

    2) and since he's going to be in Flagstaff anyway, avoid the gawd awful I-40 by heading a few hundred miles north and take in the sights in Southern Utah at this time of year. Who knows, you may not ever get this opportunity again.

    True, you'll miss RBR's favorite I-40 spot in the world, Amarillo TX.

    3) given that your dog is elderly, there's plenty of places to stop to get the dog out and around a bit. Hell, even in the middle of the road since you'll be the only one there. I did it with my dog from the time he was a pup up until he was 16 yrs old. Smell the pine forests instead of diesel.

    There is a lot of beautiful, rugged mountain scenery in southern Utah and wherever you care to go in western Colorado and it still makes for a pretty direct trip. Eastern US has nothing to compare.

    Trust me on this guys. I've made 45 +/- cross country trips by car using every possible route to get there and back.
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    Oct 10, 2015 9:15 AM GMT
    whitewater said^^^^^^^^^ Robb and Freedomisher,

    Please stop hijacking the thread and speaking for the OP and just let the OP Come back
    and state his attentions. Please stop dominating these forums pretending you know the intentions of the posters. Let them speak for themselves. Freedom tells me he is heterosexual and he doesn't belong here anyway. He could give advice of some route that goes through a homophobic town, i.e. above I mentioned to above Cortez and Mancos in Colorado as hotel stops, don't stay there, stay in the nearby liberal Durango.


    "Freedomisher"

    Was this supposed to be some sort of insult and I just missed it?

    "Freedom tells me he is heterosexual"

    Lie

    And why are you lying about your former screen names when it's so very easy to prove otherwise?

    photo TomSOCAL_1.jpg

    And please quit telling RJers what threads they can and cannot post in.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14395

    Oct 10, 2015 1:53 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob said
    whitewater said
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob saidYeah but he is heading east not west. I am trying to suggest a major route with the least heavy traffic and least stress. I-40 seems to fill the bill in that regard. With the exception of Albuquerque and Memphis, most of I-40 will be relatively free of nerve wracking rush hours and traffic tie ups. Oklahoma City, Little Rock, Nashville, and Knoxville are not overly large so their traffic shouldn't pose much of a problem. I-81 north all the way from I-40 east of Knoxville to Syracuse is primarily small town and rural for almost all of its length. Hagerstown, Harrisburg, Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, and Binghamton are all good sized cities but not big enough to create nerve wracking rush hours which makes traveling I-81 a real pleasure. I-81 also traverses scenic mountain areas and valleys for most of its length.


    "Yeah but he is heading east not west"

    Understood.

    I'm trying to get him to visit color country in southern Utah (Zion, Bryce, Escalate, Capital Reef, rt. 95 between Hanksville and Blanding, Natural Bridges, Canyonlands, Arches, Moab, rt. 128 between Moab and I-70, and then whatever for east of the Rockies on back to NY.


    If there is no snow for when he is leaving then he can go from SE Utah and then over the high passes of Western Colorado before heading down to Denver. With the fall colours that would be an awesome tripicon_biggrin.gif
    Sorry guys but he is not looking for a scenic tour through the Rockies, he is looking for a direct, stress free highway route from Phoenix to Syracuse and the best route would be I-40 east to Knoxville and than I-81 north to Syracuse. He is moving to a different city and state and he has an elderly dog going with him. Long distance car trips can become quite stressful for animals especially when the animal is older. So he has to keep the well being of his furry friend in serious consideration at all times. There is a lot of beautiful, rugged mountain scenery along I-81 in Virginia and Pennsylvania. Trust me on this guys.


    "Sorry guys but he is not looking for a scenic tour through the Rockies,"

    He may not be looking for a scenic tour through the Appalachians either.

    And I'm suggestion an alternative.

    However, IMO, the best thing to do is

    1) enjoy the trip as much as possible since you have to do it anyway.

    2) and since he's going to be in Flagstaff anyway, avoid the gawd awful I-40 by heading a few hundred miles north and take in the sights in Southern Utah at this time of year. Who knows, you may not ever get this opportunity again.

    True, you'll miss RBR's favorite I-40 spot in the world, Amarillo TX.

    3) given that your dog is elderly, there's plenty of places to stop to get the dog out and around a bit. Hell, even in the middle of the road since you'll be the only one there. I did it with my dog from the time he was a pup up until he was 16 yrs old. Smell the pine forests instead of diesel.

    There is a lot of beautiful, rugged mountain scenery in southern Utah and wherever you care to go in western Colorado and it still makes for a pretty direct trip. Eastern US has nothing to compare.

    Trust me on this guys. I've made 45 +/- cross country trips by car using every possible route to get there and back.
    Since the OP and his dog are making a major move from Phoenix to Syracuse and the OP probably has a large number of important obligations to take care of once he arrives in Syracuse the best and most stress free route would be I-17 north to Flagstaff, I-40 east to Knoxville and than I-81 north to Syracuse. Not the long roundabout route through the desolate sand and sagebrush country of Southern Utah looking at ubiquitous red rocks and giant holes in the ground. The OP doesn't have that kind of time to spare since he is facing obligations and uncertainty in his new home in Syracuse. Moving can be very worrisome. Hey I did it a few times and it is no picnic.

    FYI, Mr. Freedom, my favorite I-40 stop is Nashville, Tennessee "the Athens of the South" not anyplace in the redneck republic of Texas.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 10, 2015 2:25 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob said
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob said
    whitewater said
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob saidYeah but he is heading east not west. I am trying to suggest a major route with the least heavy traffic and least stress. I-40 seems to fill the bill in that regard. With the exception of Albuquerque and Memphis, most of I-40 will be relatively free of nerve wracking rush hours and traffic tie ups. Oklahoma City, Little Rock, Nashville, and Knoxville are not overly large so their traffic shouldn't pose much of a problem. I-81 north all the way from I-40 east of Knoxville to Syracuse is primarily small town and rural for almost all of its length. Hagerstown, Harrisburg, Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, and Binghamton are all good sized cities but not big enough to create nerve wracking rush hours which makes traveling I-81 a real pleasure. I-81 also traverses scenic mountain areas and valleys for most of its length.


    "Yeah but he is heading east not west"

    Understood.

    I'm trying to get him to visit color country in southern Utah (Zion, Bryce, Escalate, Capital Reef, rt. 95 between Hanksville and Blanding, Natural Bridges, Canyonlands, Arches, Moab, rt. 128 between Moab and I-70, and then whatever for east of the Rockies on back to NY.


    If there is no snow for when he is leaving then he can go from SE Utah and then over the high passes of Western Colorado before heading down to Denver. With the fall colours that would be an awesome tripicon_biggrin.gif
    Sorry guys but he is not looking for a scenic tour through the Rockies, he is looking for a direct, stress free highway route from Phoenix to Syracuse and the best route would be I-40 east to Knoxville and than I-81 north to Syracuse. He is moving to a different city and state and he has an elderly dog going with him. Long distance car trips can become quite stressful for animals especially when the animal is older. So he has to keep the well being of his furry friend in serious consideration at all times. There is a lot of beautiful, rugged mountain scenery along I-81 in Virginia and Pennsylvania. Trust me on this guys.


    "Sorry guys but he is not looking for a scenic tour through the Rockies,"

    He may not be looking for a scenic tour through the Appalachians either.

    And I'm suggestion an alternative.

    However, IMO, the best thing to do is

    1) enjoy the trip as much as possible since you have to do it anyway.

    2) and since he's going to be in Flagstaff anyway, avoid the gawd awful I-40 by heading a few hundred miles north and take in the sights in Southern Utah at this time of year. Who knows, you may not ever get this opportunity again.

    True, you'll miss RBR's favorite I-40 spot in the world, Amarillo TX.

    3) given that your dog is elderly, there's plenty of places to stop to get the dog out and around a bit. Hell, even in the middle of the road since you'll be the only one there. I did it with my dog from the time he was a pup up until he was 16 yrs old. Smell the pine forests instead of diesel.

    There is a lot of beautiful, rugged mountain scenery in southern Utah and wherever you care to go in western Colorado and it still makes for a pretty direct trip. Eastern US has nothing to compare.

    Trust me on this guys. I've made 45 +/- cross country trips by car using every possible route to get there and back.
    Since the OP and his dog are making a major move from Phoenix to Syracuse and the OP probably has a large number of important obligations to take care of once he arrives in Syracuse the best and most stress free route would be I-17 north to Flagstaff, I-40 east to Knoxville and than I-81 north to Syracuse. Not the long roundabout route through the desolate sand and sagebrush country of Southern Utah looking at ubiquitous red rocks and giant holes in the ground. The OP doesn't have that kind of time to spare since he is facing obligations and uncertainty in his new home in Syracuse. Moving can be very worrisome. Hey I did it a few times and it is no picnic.

    FYI, Mr. Freedom, my favorite I-40 stop is Nashville, Tennessee "the Athens of the South" not anyplace in the redneck republic of Texas.


    "sand and sagebrush country of Southern Utah looking at ubiquitous red rocks and giant holes in the ground."

    That's right, the US National Park Service has been known for sticking all those national parks in the ugliest possible locations /sarc

    No question, as one who has done this drive many many times, the worst possible drive is I-40 from Flagstaff at least until I-44 and really until Little Rock.

    True, I've done that drive many times if I was under big time constraints getting from LA back to Ohio just before Holidays, but I'd do just about anything to avoid it. All I can think of is the smell of diesel when I think about going that direction. Even I-10 and I-20 through west Texas is better, much better really.

    Much better, again, if you have the time, is to take an extra day or so (you might decided to stay a little longer) to tour that unbelievably gorgeous part of Utah and see Zion, Bryce, Grand Staircase, Capital Reef, Canyonlands, Arches National Parks and of course the Grand Canyon on your way to Utah. And Moab of course then follow the Colorado River on rt 128 up to Cisco. Then you have Rocky Mountain National Park just north of I-70 on your way to Denver.

    Then after Denver heading east, who cares, not anything to see until you get to the Appalachians, and since you'll be living back there, you see that anything you have a long weekend.

    "I-17 north to Flagstaff"

    Oh, btw, we agree on that.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14395

    Oct 10, 2015 2:38 PM GMT
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob said
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob said
    whitewater said
    freedomisntfree said
    roadbikeRob saidYeah but he is heading east not west. I am trying to suggest a major route with the least heavy traffic and least stress. I-40 seems to fill the bill in that regard. With the exception of Albuquerque and Memphis, most of I-40 will be relatively free of nerve wracking rush hours and traffic tie ups. Oklahoma City, Little Rock, Nashville, and Knoxville are not overly large so their traffic shouldn't pose much of a problem. I-81 north all the way from I-40 east of Knoxville to Syracuse is primarily small town and rural for almost all of its length. Hagerstown, Harrisburg, Wilkes-Barre, Scranton, and Binghamton are all good sized cities but not big enough to create nerve wracking rush hours which makes traveling I-81 a real pleasure. I-81 also traverses scenic mountain areas and valleys for most of its length.


    "Yeah but he is heading east not west"

    Understood.

    I'm trying to get him to visit color country in southern Utah (Zion, Bryce, Escalate, Capital Reef, rt. 95 between Hanksville and Blanding, Natural Bridges, Canyonlands, Arches, Moab, rt. 128 between Moab and I-70, and then whatever for east of the Rockies on back to NY.


    If there is no snow for when he is leaving then he can go from SE Utah and then over the high passes of Western Colorado before heading down to Denver. With the fall colours that would be an awesome tripicon_biggrin.gif
    Sorry guys but he is not looking for a scenic tour through the Rockies, he is looking for a direct, stress free highway route from Phoenix to Syracuse and the best route would be I-40 east to Knoxville and than I-81 north to Syracuse. He is moving to a different city and state and he has an elderly dog going with him. Long distance car trips can become quite stressful for animals especially when the animal is older. So he has to keep the well being of his furry friend in serious consideration at all times. There is a lot of beautiful, rugged mountain scenery along I-81 in Virginia and Pennsylvania. Trust me on this guys.


    "Sorry guys but he is not looking for a scenic tour through the Rockies,"

    He may not be looking for a scenic tour through the Appalachians either.

    And I'm suggestion an alternative.

    However, IMO, the best thing to do is

    1) enjoy the trip as much as possible since you have to do it anyway.

    2) and since he's going to be in Flagstaff anyway, avoid the gawd awful I-40 by heading a few hundred miles north and take in the sights in Southern Utah at this time of year. Who knows, you may not ever get this opportunity again.

    True, you'll miss RBR's favorite I-40 spot in the world, Amarillo TX.

    3) given that your dog is elderly, there's plenty of places to stop to get the dog out and around a bit. Hell, even in the middle of the road since you'll be the only one there. I did it with my dog from the time he was a pup up until he was 16 yrs old. Smell the pine forests instead of diesel.

    There is a lot of beautiful, rugged mountain scenery in southern Utah and wherever you care to go in western Colorado and it still makes for a pretty direct trip. Eastern US has nothing to compare.

    Trust me on this guys. I've made 45 +/- cross country trips by car using every possible route to get there and back.
    Since the OP and his dog are making a major move from Phoenix to Syracuse and the OP probably has a large number of important obligations to take care of once he arrives in Syracuse the best and most stress free route would be I-17 north to Flagstaff, I-40 east to Knoxville and than I-81 north to Syracuse. Not the long roundabout route through the desolate sand and sagebrush country of Southern Utah looking at ubiquitous red rocks and giant holes in the ground. The OP doesn't have that kind of time to spare since he is facing obligations and uncertainty in his new home in Syracuse. Moving can be very worrisome. Hey I did it a few times and it is no picnic.

    FYI, Mr. Freedom, my favorite I-40 stop is Nashville, Tennessee "the Athens of the South" not anyplace in the redneck republic of Texas.


    "sand and sagebrush country of Southern Utah looking at ubiquitous red rocks and giant holes in the ground."

    That's right, the US National Park Service has been known for sticking all those national parks in the ugliest possible locations /sarc

    No question, as one who has done this drive many many times, the worst possible drive is I-40 from Flagstaff at least until I-44 and really until Little Rock.

    True, I've done that drive many times if I was under big time constraints getting from LA back to Ohio just before Holidays, but I'd do just about anything to avoid it. All I can think of is the smell of diesel when I think about going that direction. Even I-10 and I-20 through west Texas is better, much better really.

    Much better, again, if you have the time, is to take an extra day or so (you might decided to stay a little longer) to tour that unbelievably gorgeous part of Utah and see Zion, Bryce, Grand Staircase, Capital Reef, Canyonlands, Arches National Parks and of course the Grand Canyon on your way to Utah. And Moab of course then follow the Colorado River on rt 128 up to Cisco. Then you have Rocky Mountain National Park just north of I-70 on your way to Denver.

    Then after Denver heading east, who cares, not anything to see until you get to the Appalachians, and since you'll be living back there, you see that anything you have a long weekend.

    "I-17 north to Flagstaff"

    Oh, btw, we agree on that.
    Since he is facing possible time constraints, the best route for him from Flagstaff is I-40 east to Knoxville and than I-81 north to Syracuse.

    FYI, I-40 through Western Arkansas is very beautiful and scenic with the heavily wooded Ozark Mountains which will now be bursting with bright fall colors. Fall color is a very rare, virtually non existant phenomenon in the desolate sand and sagebrush country of Arizona, Southern Utah, and most of Nevada.