A $69 flight to Europe may be in your future

  • metta

    Posts: 39077

    Oct 07, 2015 10:28 PM GMT
    A $69 flight to Europe may be in your future


    "Bjørn Kjos, the chief executive of Norwegian Air Shuttle ASA — a budget European carrier — said that, as early as 2017, he hopes to sell one-way tickets from certain cities in the U.S. to Europe starting at just $69. Average prices for roundtrip fares would be around $300, Kjos said."

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/story?guid=9b28a1f4-6d1a-11e5-a581-ae86c7b7af5b&storyguid=9b28a1f4-6d1a-11e5-a581-ae86c7b7af5b&siteid=nwhpf
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    Oct 07, 2015 11:33 PM GMT
    The way these ultra-low fares usually work, is they charge you $50 to check a bag, another $50 to have a carry-on bag, another $25 to make a reservation, another $25 to get an assigned seat, and another $100 if you have to talk to a live person and can't do everything online. And the size of the seat would accomodate a 12 year old. Quickly adds up. RyanAir even proposed charging passengers to use the restroom, but abandoned the idea.
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1272

    Oct 08, 2015 1:39 AM GMT
    Norwegian Air is shameful. They are a carrier that originates in Norway, but has registry in Ireland to avoid strict labor laws in Norway. They outsource cheap labor from Thailand. That's how they plan on financing those low fares. Disgusting company. The U.S. government should block any attempt for them to start this service from U.S. Gateways. It will put U.S. carriers at a disadvantage and threaten U.S. based jobs.


    "Norwegian Airlines is trying to circumvent the aviation agreements between the U.S. and European Union to usher in a race to the bottom for cheap labor. While NAI is Norwegian in origin and ownership, the airline will operate as an Irish air carrier while hiring flight crews who will be based in Thailand and employed on individual employment contracts with a Singaporean hiring agency. All that, and the airline won’t even be flying into or out of Ireland. It’s just headquartered there to lower labor standards by avoiding Norway’s strong labor and social laws".
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    Oct 08, 2015 6:38 PM GMT
    You get what you pay for. Who's next, Spirit? Yuk!
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Oct 08, 2015 8:29 PM GMT
    Another way they could save $$ would be by using planes that don't have pressurized cabins.

    Pressurized cabins greatly increase costs. The plane has to be made extra strong to withstand the pressure; that increases costs. It also requires fuel to keep the cabin pressurized.

    Considering how much less it would cost to provide oxygen masks which passengers would wear at all times, the price of tickets could be considerably reduced if they did that. Windows also cost money; they could eliminate those too. And, if all that made passengers nervous, they could provide free Diazepam.

    Of course we get what we pay for (at least sometimes), but many people cannot afford to fly when planes are pressurized and have windows.
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    Oct 09, 2015 12:34 PM GMT
    ChicagoSteve saidNorwegian Air is shameful. They are a carrier that originates in Norway, but has registry in Ireland to avoid strict labor laws in Norway. They outsource cheap labor from Thailand. That's how they plan on financing those low fares. Disgusting company. The U.S. government should block any attempt for them to start this service from U.S. Gateways. It will put U.S. carriers at a disadvantage and threaten U.S. based jobs.


    "Norwegian Airlines is trying to circumvent the aviation agreements between the U.S. and European Union to usher in a race to the bottom for cheap labor. While NAI is Norwegian in origin and ownership, the airline will operate as an Irish air carrier while hiring flight crews who will be based in Thailand and employed on individual employment contracts with a Singaporean hiring agency. All that, and the airline won’t even be flying into or out of Ireland. It’s just headquartered there to lower labor standards by avoiding Norway’s strong labor and social laws".


    They already fly to the US, don't they?
  • mar0302

    Posts: 273

    Oct 09, 2015 7:25 PM GMT
    They already fly to the US...
  • monet

    Posts: 1093

    Oct 10, 2015 12:39 AM GMT
    It would be cheaper and more comfortable to seal yourself up in a cardboard box and FedEx yourself to Europe.
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    Oct 10, 2015 6:06 AM GMT
    monet saidIt would be cheaper and more comfortable to seal yourself up in a cardboard box and FedEx yourself to Europe.

    icon_lol.gif
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Oct 10, 2015 7:24 PM GMT
    monet saidIt would be cheaper and more comfortable to seal yourself up in a cardboard box and FedEx yourself to Europe.


    Actually, that has been tried.

    During the Cold War, the Russian embassy in the U.S. drugged someone, tied him to a chair which was fastened inside of a wood box, and tried to ship him to Russia. Fortunately, while he was being loaded, someone heard him groan, opened the box, and released him. It was quite a scandal.
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1272

    Oct 10, 2015 7:46 PM GMT
    mar0302 saidThey already fly to the US...
    Wow, I was totally out of the loop on this! They are trying to gain additional transatlantic routes from the U.S.and there is a movement to prevent this.
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    Oct 10, 2015 9:35 PM GMT
    MGINSD saidYou get what you pay for. Who's next, Spirit? Yuk!
    I know a Spirit captain who has two Lambo's, a private twin-engine airplane, and a small yacht. And he even says Spirit price-gouges the passengers. icon_lol.gif
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    Oct 11, 2015 11:27 AM GMT
    FRE0 said
    Actually, that has been tried.

    During the Cold War, the Russian embassy in the U.S. drugged someone, tied him to a chair which was fastened inside of a wood box, and tried to ship him to Russia. Fortunately, while he was being loaded, someone heard him groan, opened the box, and released him. It was quite a scandal.


    There have also been some successful (and willing) "postees":

    The man who posted himself to Australia

    In the mid-1960s, Australian athlete Reg Spiers found himself stranded in London with no money to buy a plane ticket home. Desperate to get back to Australia in time for his daughter's birthday, he decided to post himself in a wooden crate.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-31700049
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    Oct 15, 2015 12:46 PM GMT
    US' three remaining traditional airlines are getting it from all sides. The "ME3" (Emirates, Etihad and Qatar Airways) enjoy government subsidies and are investing heavily in European airlines and routes. Nimbler U.S. carriers like jetBlue and Frontier, who don't have decades of debt and retiree pensions, are able to adapt to changing markets faster. Plus they are all trying to recover from mergers, combining disparate fleets, worker contracts, systems and cultures with varying degrees of success.

    U.S. Airways will disappear this week, having been gobbled up by American. Northwest is now Delta, Continental is now United.

    Same thing is happening in Europe. It used to be that every country had its own airline (many of which were state-owned and operated in some cases by the post office) which was a national pride thing but kind of inefficient given the sizes of the countries. Now although many of the paint jobs remain, the companies are consolidating. KLM and Air France are one company, BA and Iberia are one company and are about to take over Aer Lingus, and Lufthansa operates the Swiss, Belgian and probably several other airlines.