Spam texts??

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 01, 2009 7:27 PM GMT
    I just got a text on my cell phone from "Marla@kingcity.com (textfame.com) steven You've been selected"..So naturally I texted back "I'm not Steven and what is this for?" and no reply. I looked up kingcity.com which is a webpage for King City, Calif...the kicker is I looked up textfame.com and it is a webpage for a free trial for Viagra! Like I need it!! Does anyone else receive these spamtexts? Isn't there a law?
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    Feb 01, 2009 7:49 PM GMT
    Er... you replied? No!

    Anything claiming you won something you didn't join is a hoax. That includes emails, phone numbers, supposedly 'random' lotteries etc. Even if their headers sound official (like the infamous Yahoo Lottery or the UK National Lottery, etc.)

    I got one last night too. Claiming my cell number won a price from a lottery hosted by a local governor. YEAH RIGHT! Dunno about your place, but you can report the number of those spammers here to the police.

    Just DON'T REPLY.
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    Feb 01, 2009 7:50 PM GMT
    Read more about them here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phishing
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    Feb 01, 2009 7:50 PM GMT
    why do people reply to these messages. They are so obviously spam....
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    Feb 01, 2009 7:51 PM GMT
    Well I dont think I really was selected for anything..I think it accomplished what it sent out to do...get the recipient to go to the web site out of pure curiosity. I think I am quite some ways away from needing Viagra or Cialis.
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    Feb 01, 2009 7:54 PM GMT
    Just don't get your computer destroyed by this sort of thing... Kay

    icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 01, 2009 7:59 PM GMT
    If you're lucky it was simply an 'ad' form of phishing.

    If not, you could probably already be infected by something called a 'Drive By Download' where simply visiting their website will infect your computer (or phone) with spyware that can monitor your activity.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spyware

    A third way of distributing spyware involves tricking users by manipulating security features designed to prevent unwanted installations. Internet Explorer prevents websites from initiating an unwanted download. Instead, it requires a user action, such as clicking on a link. However, links can prove deceptive: for instance, a pop-up ad may appear like a standard Windows dialog box. The box contains a message such as "Would you like to optimize your Internet access?" with links which look like buttons reading Yes and No. No matter which "button" the user presses, a download starts, placing the spyware on the user's system. Later versions of Internet Explorer offer fewer avenues for this attack.

    Some spyware authors infect a system through security holes in the Web browser or in other software. When the user navigates to a Web page controlled by the spyware author, the page contains code which attacks the browser and forces the download and installation of spyware. The spyware author would also have some extensive knowledge of commercially-available anti-virus and firewall software. This has become known as a "drive-by download", which leaves the user a hapless bystander to the attack. Common browser exploits target security vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer and in the Sun Microsystems Java runtime.

    The installation of spyware frequently involves Internet Explorer. Its popularity and history of security issues have made it the most frequent target. Its deep integration with the Windows environment and scriptability make it an obvious point of attack into Windows. Internet Explorer also serves as a point of attachment for spyware in the form of Browser Helper Objects, which modify the browser's behaviour to add toolbars or to redirect traffic.

    In a few cases, a worm or virus has delivered a spyware payload. Some attackers used the Spybot worm to install spyware that put pornographic pop-ups on the infected system's screen. By directing traffic to ads set up to channel funds to the spyware authors, they profit personally.


    So I repeat:

    DO NOT VISIT LINKS FROM OBVIOUS SPAM
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    Feb 01, 2009 8:04 PM GMT
    Thx Sed...I hope my Norton is working!!
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    Feb 01, 2009 8:15 PM GMT
    np, man. Though I don't particularly like Norton meself. icon_razz.gif Still if it's up-to-date, it should protect you.
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    Feb 01, 2009 8:30 PM GMT
    Maybe you can catch a flight from Manila and work on my hard drive icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 01, 2009 8:38 PM GMT
    NJDewd saidMaybe you can catch a flight from Manila and work on my hard drive icon_smile.gif


    You heard the man, Sed... go jump his bones, I mean, the next flight to NJ. icon_wink.gificon_lol.gif