France's Grocery Stores Banned From Wasting Food Under New Law

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    Oct 14, 2015 5:25 AM GMT
    I applaud this France law, our own LA Haggen grocery chain failure could take a lesson from France, in contrast though, I took my tea party religious sister, the one who defriended me, her comment is straight off FB, just shows how selfish and unkind her people are, she is more worried about the "business" profits rather than, feeding people, typical, unfortunately I am finding my sisters views more and more disturbing as the right wing climbs closer to the fringe, letting people starve is no "act of christianity", I suppose because the video mentions "socialism", the pro capitalists, anti government like my sister are all over this in a very mean spirited way, please watch the embedded video in the link. The differences in our mind sets are like night and day, I don't know who she is anymore icon_confused.gif



    """The unintended consequences of such a law will be the supermarkets will carry fewer and fewer groceries in their stores which will cause prices to rise . The unintended consequences for this will be food shortages. Every law enacted hurts real people. Terrible law with a terrible outcome on the horizon"""




    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/05/22/france-food-waste-grocery-stores_n_7422090.html


    The global fight against hunger is less about food and more about waste with one-third of the world's food going uneaten every year. Now France has a new weapon with a law forcing grocery stores to give away — rather than throw away — their unsold food.

    "It's scandalous to see bleach being poured into supermarket dustbins along with edible foods," said Socialist deputy Guillaume Garot, according to The Guardian. The former food minister proposed the new law banning the disposal of unspoiled food which passed unanimously on Thursday.

    The law also makes larger supermarkets sign food donation contracts with charities or risk fines of up to $100,000 or two years in jail. Unsold groceries that aren't safe for human consumption can be used for animal feed or farm compost.

    CBC reports that France is in the midst of a push to cut their food waste in half by 2025, from the current level of 20-30 kg per person, or as much as $27 billion per year total. Other efforts include targeting school cafeteria waste, educating students about reducing waste at home and eliminating best-before dates on non-perishable items.

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    Oct 14, 2015 5:54 AM GMT
    Why would a grocery store throw out unspoiled food in the first place? I worked in a grocery store when in high school. Produce that was ripe was discounted. I remember an elderly gentlemen coming by every morning as we opened the store so he could have first pick of the over ripe produce. He said he fed it to his animals. Meat approaching it's sell by date was also discounted. Most other items with expired sell by dates were thrown out. I can't see giving away expired foods. The first person to get sick would sue. The liability is too high.
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    Oct 14, 2015 6:28 AM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidWhy would a grocery store throw out unspoiled food in the first place? I worked in a grocery store when in high school. Produce that was ripe was discounted. I remember an elderly gentlemen coming by every morning as we opened the store so he could have first pick of the over ripe produce. He said he fed it to his animals. Meat approaching it's sell by date was also discounted. Most other items with expired sell by dates were thrown out. I can't see giving away expired foods. The first person to get sick would sue. The liability is too high.



    "eliminating best-before dates on non-perishable items" many of the non perishable foods don't sell


    List of Unperishable Foods
    http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/list-unperishable-foods-10624.html


    Nonperishable food items are considered shelf-stable. These foods will be able to withstand months of unrefrigerated storage without spoiling or decaying. When donating food to a food pantry, make sure that all the foods are nonperishable. In addition, keep a supply of nonperishable foods in your home in the event of an emergency. When buying such food items, choose a variety of nutritious foods, like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy, meats, beans and nuts, in order to meet nutrient requirements.


    Fruits and Vegetables

    Nonperishable fruits and vegetables are available as canned goods. Fruits and vegetable are important components of a healthy diet, as they contain many essential vitamins and minerals. When selecting canned vegetables, choose low-sodium varieties whenever possible. Green beans, peas, carrots and tomatoes are all healthy options to choose from. Look for fruits that are packed in water or their own juice to cut down on added sugar. Oranges, applesauce, pineapple and peaches are some examples of nutritious nonperishable fruits. Dried fruits, like raisins, apricots and prunes, are also shelf-stable and can provide energy and lots of nutrients.


    Whole Grains

    Grains in your diet give the body energy. When it comes to nonperishable grains, choose whole grains because they contain more vitamins, minerals, fiber and protein than their refined counterparts. Whole-grain cold cereals, oatmeal, whole-wheat pasta, brown rice, barley, quinoa and whole-grain crackers are some nutrient-packed options to pick from.


    Meat, Beans and Nuts

    Your body depends on meat, beans or nuts for muscle-building protein. There are many options when looking for protein-packed nonperishable foods. Canned tuna, salmon and chicken each provide lean protein. In addition, canned fish, like sardines and salmon, can be a good source of calcium and vitamin D when the bones are eaten as well. Calcium and vitamin D are necessary because they help to build strong bones and teeth. Canned or dried beans, like black beans, kidney beans and chickpeas, are not only packed with protein, but they are also an excellent source of fiber. Nuts and nut butter, like almonds, peanuts and peanut butter, contain heart-healthy fats, fiber and plenty of protein.


    Nutrient-Packed Dairy

    Dairy products are an excellent source of bone-building nutrients calcium and vitamin D. Although there are not many options when it comes to nonperishable dairy products, a few do exist. Low-fat evaporated, canned or dry milk are some available options to help meet dairy needs. In addition, low-fat, low-sugar pudding cups will provide much-needed calcium.


    Other Nonperishable Items

    Other foods to consider when it comes to nonperishable items are ready-to-eat meal and snack foods. Low-sodium soups provide vegetables and protein and require little preparation. Jarred pasta sauces can be paired with whole-wheat noodles for a quick, healthy meal. Also, trail mixes, whole-grain cereal or granola bars and protein bars make for energizing shelf-stable snacks.
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    Oct 14, 2015 8:38 AM GMT
    Sometimes One is not impressed with the amount of food that gets to see out in our home. Buy things with intention to use, and unexpected things happen, and when you think you'll cook this tonight or make this just doesn't happen; it's a fact of life.

    Should one feel galley about the fruit and vegetables from the garden, that go in the compost? it goes back to father earth.

    Yet at the sametime, we are not responsible for other people's poor lifestyle choices either. Albeit I dedicate time helping the less fortunate.

    This just seems something off centre Left to me.
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    Oct 14, 2015 3:43 PM GMT
    It seems to me that sale-by date on groceries (boxed and canned items) is a late development and-in-many cases-ridiculous. But they will throw it away if it's past the arbitrary date.

    Also I read that high-end grocery stores throw out tons of prepared foods which they stock knowing this will occur as a means of differentiating themselves.
  • metta

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    Oct 14, 2015 9:33 PM GMT
    Grocery stores have to throw out a lot of food. They normally throw them out a little before the sell by dates. I think that grocery stores should be required to donate non-expired goods in fair condition to food banks.