Best 'Apocolyptic' themed movies - what's yours?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 19, 2015 6:51 AM GMT
    I can't remember all of my favourite Apocolyptic themed movies. But of those I can, here are a few: Crimson Tide, War Games, Deep Impact, 2012 (not so good but had great special effects), The Philadelphia Experiment and of course Armageddon. What's your's?
  • tictactoe

    Posts: 29

    Oct 19, 2015 7:24 AM GMT
    Armageddon? Seriously??

  • leanandclean

    Posts: 270

    Oct 19, 2015 11:02 AM GMT
    Melancholia. "The Earth is evil. We don't need to grieve for it. ... Nobody will miss it."
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 19, 2015 11:19 AM GMT
    tictactoe saidArmageddon? Seriously??

    If you can't post sensible replies, why bother? Seriously!
  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Oct 19, 2015 5:49 PM GMT
    The Terminator movies with Arnold are fun, always some goofy humor somewhere along the way
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 19, 2015 10:20 PM GMT
    Here are some of my favorites:

    * Hunger Games
    *Oblivion
    * Maze Runner
    * Insurgent
    * Attack on Titan (Anime Movie)
    * Matrix
    * The Book of Eli
    * I am Legend
    * Resident Evil

  • BuddhaLing

    Posts: 107

    Oct 19, 2015 10:59 PM GMT
    Fine_Young_Cannibal saidI can't remember all of my favourite Apocolyptic based movies. But of those I can, here are a few: Crimson Tide, War Games, Deep Impact, 2012 (not so good but had great special effects), The Philadelphia Experiment and of course Armageddon. What's your's?


    Apocalypse Now
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 19, 2015 11:03 PM GMT
    Not a movie but the Walking Dead tv show. My favorite television series!
  • Yatsufusa

    Posts: 23

    Oct 19, 2015 11:50 PM GMT
    Uhm, The Mad Max series, DUH. Loved all four movies, including the new one.

    Also, another great movie is 28 Days Later.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 20, 2015 12:19 AM GMT
    Testament. The most devastating movie about a family, lead by Jane Alexander, who have to grapple w/ the aftereffects of a surprise nuclear holocaust. I'd give details, but if you've never experienced it for yourself, it's best to go in fresh. It's not what you think.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 20, 2015 2:15 AM GMT
    I think the recent film "Interstellar" falls into this category. The "earth" scenes were far more gripping and thought provoking to me than the space scenes.

    Also, "Children of Men".

    And an old classic -- " On the Beach".

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 20, 2015 2:18 AM GMT
    p6o00xgvz0rgn8ss0rvq.jpg

    Tank_girl_poster.jpg

    kaboom-movie-poster-2010-1010695315.jpg

    11189423_ori.jpg

    Oh I don't know... there are so many.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 20, 2015 3:39 AM GMT
    tj85016 saidThe Terminator movies with Arnold are fun, always some goofy humor somewhere along the way
    I forgot 'The Terminator' also a fav' of mine. Thanks for reminding me. Oh, yes 'Buddhaling' - FYI, 'Apocolypse Now' is about Vietnam...'I love the smell of Napalm in the morning!'
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 20, 2015 5:06 AM GMT
    In no particular order:

    The Terminator
    2012
    The Day after Tomorrow
    Dr. Strangelove...
    28 Days
    Reign of Fire
    The Darkest Hour


    I'm sure there are more I liked, but those are what comes immediately to mind.



  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Oct 20, 2015 5:17 AM GMT
    Given your question, I would only note that "apocalyptic" and "post-apocalyptic" movies are entirely different genres:

    Apocalyptic:
    Dr. Strange Love: or How I learned To Stop Worrying & Love the Bomb
    28 Days Later
    Night of the Living Dead (Romero original and remake)
    Dawn of the Dead (Love Romero)
    Interstellar
    The Invasion of the body snatchers (1950s, 70s and 90s)
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    Deep Impact (sooooo much better than Armageddon)
    The Matrix
    Roots
    Gone With The Wind (in NO way an ascension to its hetero-normative and racist worldview & mores)
    B-LIST: The Happening
    B-LIST: The Sum of All Fears
    B-List: Cloverfield



    Post-Apocalyptic:
    Day of the Dead (still Love Romero, but after the dust settles)
    28 Weeks Later
    Roots (yes again, the mini-series (and book) were so long it qualifies as properly both)
    Europa Report ("apocalyptic" for Mars)
    I am Legend (hat tip commentator above reminding me)
    The Omega Man (could be "apocalyptic" but the dust had settled)


    Frankly, there are so many that's all I'll type off the top of my mind. There are, literally, hundreds in each sub-genre. Happy viewing!
  • mstone18

    Posts: 84

    Oct 20, 2015 5:30 AM GMT
    The most interesting one to me was a 1957 B&W film called:

    "The 27th Day"

    I don't think you can find it anymore, but come to find a whole Wikipedia article on it recently.

    As a boy in the 70's I thought it a particularly well made commentary on what would the world do.. if aliens came to earth looking for a new home (because theirs died of natural causes).. they give us the means to destroy all our enemies.

    They picked people from each major faction on earth and gave them tiny devices that were "voice activated" that would destroy human life but leave every other life form unharmed.

    All they had to do was speak the lat and lon of their target.

    The thing was every faction had the same means.

    These chosen ones fought the urge to commit genocide, but were hunted down after the aliens told each of their governments about these people to hasten our doom along.. they had made a long journey and needed to conclude humanity quickly.. we didn't know that of course.

    The aliens were pacifists unable to kill intelligent life themselves, it was against their own laws.

    Eventually scientist from each faction banded together and after a brief battle eliminate a large portion of the population of earth.. and then invite the aliens to come live among them.

    Very deep thinking I thought until I read the Wikipedia article and found it somewhat less of an original story but based on a book, with strong overtones of some dark ideas about society.

    It almost seems 'Alien Nation' and 'District 9' made 20 and 30 years later were direct sequels to these events. And then 'Elysium' seemed to follow up those events.

    Its not a movie but Victor Vinges 'Marooned in Realtime' could even follow up the events of 'Elysium' where one-way time travel into the future is discovered with 'Baubbles' that freeze time and space in a sphere for a period of time and let people hurl themselves forwards in real time.

    That story revolved around a murder in which humanity was deliberately trying to escape an post apocalyptic world.. but a victim was 'marooned' outside as the city moved on through time without them.. like a train leaving the station.

    It also made sense in that using a time travel device humnaity might sync up with aliens separated by geological or stellar ages instead of a coencidence of birth time.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Oct 20, 2015 5:42 AM GMT
    mstone18 saidThe most interesting one to me was a 1957 B&W film called:

    "The 27th Day"

    I don't think you can find it anymore, but come to find a whole Wikipedia article on it recently.

    As a boy in the 70's I thought it a particularly well made commentary on what would the world do.. if aliens came to earth looking for a new home (because theirs died of natural causes).. they give us the means to destroy all our enemies.

    They picked people from each major faction on earth and gave them tiny devices that were "voice activated" that would destroy human life but leave every other life form unharmed.

    All they had to do was speak the lat and lon of their target.

    The thing was every faction had the same means.

    These chosen ones fought the urge to commit genocide, but were hunted down after the aliens told each of their governments about these people to hasten our doom along.. they had made a long journey and needed to conclude humanity quickly.. we didn't know that of course.

    The aliens were pacifists unable to kill intelligent life themselves, it was against their own laws.

    Eventually scientist from each faction banded together and after a brief battle eliminate a large portion of the population of earth.. and then invite the aliens to come live among them.

    Very deep thinking I thought until I read the Wikipedia article and found it somewhat less of an original story but based on a book, with strong overtones of some dark ideas about society.

    It almost seems 'Alien Nation' and 'District 9' made 20 and 40 years later were direct sequels to these events.


    This 1957 movie actually sounds compelling. Though it may be a mix of The Invasion of the Body Snatchers meets The Most Dangerous Game, and in that sense might not be the most original movie script, I certainly have given less worthy pics a flick. I'll look for this one, thanks!
  • mstone18

    Posts: 84

    Oct 20, 2015 5:52 AM GMT
    Svnw688 said

    This 1957 movie actually sounds compelling. Though it may be a mix of The Invasion of the Body Snatchers meets The Most Dangerous Game, and in that sense might not be the most original movie script, I certainly have given less worthy pics a flick. I'll look for this one, thanks!


    The memory of the movie is probably better than the execution. I must have been about ten years old at the time.

    As crazy as it sounds, for that time it was a 'hopeful' movie because we lived in a dull fear that the world would end with another World War and Nuclear arms being deployed.

    That 'aliens' could come and disturb the status quo and 'save us' was a faustian deal at best.

    Interesting you bring up Invasion of the Body Snatchers and that whole Twilight Zone, Night Gallery generation of dull fear of the unknown. A very disturbing and distracting time.

    Planet of the Apes was a thinly veiled version of Animal Farm.. many of the classics were turning up in dramas without the general public realizing it.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Oct 20, 2015 6:37 AM GMT
    ^^Agreed. And Rod Serling's The Twilight Zone remains one of the most well-executed examples of "art compromising to meet viewership" (as opposed to 'art uncompromising and perhaps being viewed by few or none). Mr. Serling embraced avant-garde (and that term is not used lightly) issues of black/minority racial equality, gender equality, opposition to heightism/weightism (e.g., "Number 23" where every person at the age of 18 picked a number (perhaps 1-30) and had plastic surgery to CONFORM to that ideal of societal beauty), opposition to a Euro-Centric standard of beauty (e.g., "The Eye of the Beholder," better known as the beautiful blonde under bandages revealed to exist in a "perfect" world of pig-people).

    The amount of works reiterated, adapted, or revamped for the so-called "mainstream" consumer is nearly too large to count. I don't mean to come across as a snob, because I know I am unfamiliar with MANY great works of literature and art. I only hope that we can all more openly discuss where a concept/idea originates without being judged or "iced" in anyway.

    (Serling for life!--despite his ostensible and alleged homophobia, which I believe was a necessary one-off remark in a live-TV interview to cover his own homosexuality or homosexual tendencies).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 20, 2015 11:20 AM GMT
    'Svnw688 - said' Gone with the wind (A romantic War drama), stay on the subject, don't ruin the thread. I just remembered another great movie 'The Seventh Sign (with Demi Moore)', also 'End of Days'. Think someone mentioned it already. Will Smith 'I am Legend'
  • djacobs

    Posts: 35

    Oct 20, 2015 1:44 PM GMT
    Independence Day
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Oct 20, 2015 10:10 PM GMT
    I`ve seen so many(and read a few books on the subject, too), but I remember 'When Worlds Collide' with affection.
    A good recent one I saw was 'The Road'.
  • Yatsufusa

    Posts: 23

    Oct 20, 2015 10:58 PM GMT
    Lincsbear saidI`ve seen so many(and read a few books on the subject, too), but I remember 'When Worlds Collide' with affection.
    A good recent one I saw was 'The Road'.


    If you liked The Road, I recommend reading the book as well.

    To be honest this is my favourite type of film, don't know if I would call it a genre, but these are my favourite movies to watch for sure.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 20, 2015 11:11 PM GMT
    Since we need to now specify, I'll put forth "War of the Worlds." Having seen it a few years ago, as opposed to when I was six or seven, it was sort of, "ennnh.." However, the sight of that blighted, destroyed tentacled hand reaching out will stay with me forever.
  • fitartistsf

    Posts: 638

    Oct 20, 2015 11:18 PM GMT
    You all seem to have forgotten, "Damnation Alley", with Jan Michael Vincent...