10 jobs that attract the most psychopaths

  • tj85016

    Posts: 4123

    Oct 19, 2015 11:41 PM GMT
    http://www.statista.com/chart/3883/the-jobs-that-attract-the-most-psychopaths/

    http://www.alternet.org/culture/10-careers-most-psychopaths
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    Oct 19, 2015 11:52 PM GMT
    Sounds familiar.

     Superficially charming, psychopaths tend to make a good first impression on others and often strike observers as remarkably normal. Yet they are self-centered, dishonest and undependable, and at times they engage in irresponsible behavior for no apparent reason other than the sheer fun of it. Largely devoid of guilt, empathy and love, they have casual and callous interpersonal and romantic relationships. Psychopaths routinely offer excuses for their reckless and often outrageous actions, placing blame on others instead. They rarely learn from their mistakes or benefit from negative feedback, and they have difficulty inhibiting their impulses.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14310

    Oct 20, 2015 5:24 PM GMT
    I am surprised that football players especially the NFL didn't make the list.
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    Oct 20, 2015 9:07 PM GMT
    It's an amusing article, particularly as it relates to lawyers (no. 2 on the list). It's a bit of a generalization because it assumes that the majority of lawyers are litigators, which is far from reality. In fact, many lawyers are averse to litigation practice for a variety of reasons--e.g., fear of public speaking, inability to think on their feet, aversion to confrontation, etc. That being said, I would agree that "true" litigators (and by that I mean those amongst us who voluntarily choose litigation as opposed to being dragged into it) have psychopathic (not sociopathic) characteristics or tendencies. Comically, CEOs are number 1 on the list--but the article fails to note that these CEOs generally take advice from their lawyers.
  • Guido4real69

    Posts: 87

    Oct 20, 2015 9:19 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidI am surprised that football players especially the NFL didn't make the list.
    go ride your bike !
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    Oct 20, 2015 9:26 PM GMT
    11) forum moderators
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Oct 20, 2015 10:02 PM GMT
    Well thank god I'm not on that list, nurse/yoga instructor obviously doesn't cut it.
    They say, being a policeman, it takes a criminal to catch a criminal so I expect most psychopaths are in that job.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14310

    Oct 20, 2015 10:11 PM GMT
    Guido4real69 said
    roadbikeRob saidI am surprised that football players especially the NFL didn't make the list.
    go ride your bike !
    Go work on your goddamned house, the place that you were whining about like a two year old baby about bitterly regretting buying it.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Oct 20, 2015 11:13 PM GMT
    Lumpyoatmeal saidSounds familiar.

     Superficially charming, psychopaths tend to make a good first impression on others and often strike observers as remarkably normal. Yet they are self-centered, dishonest and undependable, and at times they engage in irresponsible behavior for no apparent reason other than the sheer fun of it. Largely devoid of guilt, empathy and love, they have casual and callous interpersonal and romantic relationships. Psychopaths routinely offer excuses for their reckless and often outrageous actions, placing blame on others instead. They rarely learn from their mistakes or benefit from negative feedback, and they have difficulty inhibiting their impulses.


    Yet #1 according to the article are CEOs. Their behavior could be somewhat outrageous but if "They rarely learn from their mistakes or benefit from negative feedback..." they could not become CEOs. I'm sure that many can inhibit their impulses when it is clearly in their interest to do so.
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    Oct 21, 2015 1:22 AM GMT
    DOMINUS saidIt's an amusing article, particularly as it relates to lawyers (no. 2 on the list). It's a bit of a generalization because it assumes that the majority of lawyers are litigators, which is far from reality. In fact, many lawyers are averse to litigation practice for a variety of reasons--e.g., fear of public speaking, inability to think on their feet, aversion to confrontation, etc. That being said, I would agree that "true" litigators (and by that I mean those amongst us who voluntarily choose litigation as opposed to being dragged into it) have psychopathic (not sociopathic) characteristics or tendencies. Comically, CEOs are number 1 on the list--but the article fails to note that these CEOs generally take advice from their lawyers.


    My experience with other litigators is that they are willing to lie or engage in unethical practices and have no shame when they get caught. Obviously that is not how most litigators operate, but there are enough that it makes an impact.
  • Svnw688

    Posts: 3350

    Oct 21, 2015 7:06 AM GMT
    FLgator said
    DOMINUS saidIt's an amusing article, particularly as it relates to lawyers (no. 2 on the list). It's a bit of a generalization because it assumes that the majority of lawyers are litigators, which is far from reality. In fact, many lawyers are averse to litigation practice for a variety of reasons--e.g., fear of public speaking, inability to think on their feet, aversion to confrontation, etc. That being said, I would agree that "true" litigators (and by that I mean those amongst us who voluntarily choose litigation as opposed to being dragged into it) have psychopathic (not sociopathic) characteristics or tendencies. Comically, CEOs are number 1 on the list--but the article fails to note that these CEOs generally take advice from their lawyers.


    My experience with other litigators is that they are willing to lie or engage in unethical practices and have no shame when they get caught. Obviously that is not how most litigators operate, but there are enough that it makes an impact.


    The State Bar regulating that particular lawyer--or bars plural--would be unlikely to turn a blind eye to systematic unethical behavior. I say this as a lawyer. Every lawyer will--eventually--have a bar complaint lodged against them (lodged by a member of the public) and be asked to respond to an inquiry letter (generally the step BEFORE a formal grievance, which can only be filed by the bar and not an informant), but where there is smoker there is fire. But a complaint and an inquiry letter from the bar requesting a statement is nothing. A grievance is bad and can only be filed by the bar itself.

    In short, if you get one disgruntled client to allege you're over billing, then your word that you aren't is likely enough. Maybe you'd have to submit a few billing invoices and time sheets. However, if a parade of unrelated clients allege substantially the same scheme/complaint, your ass is grass.

    The cream always rises to the top and Satan always gets smoked out. Tread carefully fellow litigators.