Einstein challenged by "spooky" quantum breakthrough

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    Oct 22, 2015 11:49 PM GMT
    How is this news? Non-locality says the same thing, yes?

    Spooky Quantum Breakthrough

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p035x2cn

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    Oct 23, 2015 4:08 AM GMT
    Do you mean "how is this NOT news?"

    I've known about this for years. Some say it's proof that our conscious creates our world.
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    Oct 24, 2015 1:45 AM GMT
    Quantum Nonlocality

    In theoretical physics, quantum nonlocality is the phenomenon by which measurements made at a microscopic level contradict a collection of notions known as local realism that are regarded as intuitively true in classical mechanics. Rigorously, quantum nonlocality refers to quantum mechanical predictions of many-system measurement correlations that cannot be simulated by any local hidden variable theory. Many entangled quantum states produce such correlations when measured, as demonstrated by Bell's theorem.

    Other than what the bbc posted in the OP, below is a link to what the New York Times posted.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/22/science/quantum-theory-experiment-said-to-prove-spooky-interactions.html?_r=0
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    Oct 24, 2015 1:46 AM GMT
    Nonlocality vs entanglement
    See also: Quantum entanglement

    In the media and popular science, quantum nonlocality is often portrayed as being equivalent to entanglement. While it is true that a bipartite quantum state must be entangled in order for it to produce nonlocal correlations, there exist entangled states which do not produce such correlations. A well-known example of this is constituted by a subset of Werner states that are entangled but whose correlations can always be described using local hidden variables.[18] On the other hand, reasonably simple examples of Bell inequalities have been found for which the quantum state giving the largest violation is never a maximally entangled state, showing that entanglement is, in some sense, not even proportional to nonlocality.[26][27][28]

    In short, entanglement of a two-party state is necessary but not sufficient for that state to be nonlocal. It is important to recognise that entanglement is more commonly viewed as an algebraic concept, noted for being a precedent to nonlocality as well as quantum teleportation and superdense coding, whereas nonlocality is interpreted according to experimental statistics and is much more involved with the foundations and interpretations of quantum mechanics.
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    Oct 24, 2015 8:25 PM GMT
    Yes, my question about is this news given nonlocality and Heisenberg, a scientist before the mid-20th century.

    Highlights



    Nonlocality in an exactly soluble 2D Ising–Heisenberg spin system is studied.


    Nonlocality identifies the location and the order of the thermal phase transition.


    In anti-ferromagnetic phase, the nonlocality is enhanced by thermal fluctuation.


    In ferromagnetic phase, a novel type of quantum correlation is observed.

    Abstract

    In this paper, we use the Bell inequality to study the bipartite correlation in an exactly soluble two-dimensional Ising–Heisenberg spin system. The Bell inequality can detect not only the quantum phase transition, but also the thermal phase transitions, of the system. The property of bipartite correlation in the system is also analyzed. In the quantum anti-ferromagnetic phase, the Bell inequality is violated thus nonlocality is present. It is interesting that the nonlocality is enhanced by thermal fluctuation, and similar results have not been observed in anti-ferromagnetic phases. In the ferromagnetic phase, the quantum correlation turns out to be very novel, which cannot be captured by entanglement or nonlocality.
    Keywords

    A. Two-dimensional spin model; D. Phase transition; D. Nonlocality; D. Bell inequality

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0038109814000301

    AND

    On the Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Why Heisenberg Captures Nonlocality Better Than Schrödinger

    AND

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    Oct 28, 2015 12:52 AM GMT
    StephenOABC said

    Highlights



    In anti-ferromagnetic phase, the nonlocality is enhanced by thermal fluctuation.


    In ferromagnetic phase, a novel type of quantum correlation is observed.

    Abstract

    It is interesting that the nonlocality is enhanced by thermal fluctuation, and similar results have not been observed in anti-ferromagnetic phases. In the ferromagnetic phase, the quantum correlation turns out to be very novel, which cannot be captured by entanglement or nonlocality.
    Keywords



    Jason:

    They are still looking at Temperature (thermal) as a flow according to the Carnot Cycle.

    Heat is the incoherence of fermions (electrons). Brownian Motion. Quantum Turbulence. Disorder/ Chaos.

    By having intense pulses of magnetic fields, it generates what's called the Quantum Hall Effect. There is a known temperature drop correlating with electric output.
    The organization of the electrons already present results in a drop in temperature. Organizing "electrons" means moving them in a wave-like manner. But when they are really organized, they don't move on the Z axis. Only about the X and Y. (2 dimensional system)

    They think that by dropping the temperature, it makes for more organization. NO!!!
    That makes for chaos in slow motion.
    Chaos in slow motion is NOT order.
    Lack of incoherence does not = coherence.
    Having less white light does not = a laser beam.

    It's not like a see-saw where 1 side drops in proportion to how the other side rises.

    They think that by lowering existing heat, you get superconductivity. (which completely defeats the notion of room temperature superconductivity. It's an oxy-moron)

    Super conductivity has to do with the amount of quantum ORDER. Not that superconductivity has to do with the lack of disorder.

    Turn on the TV to a channel where you get the white static and snow. Now put that in slow motion. How the hell does that = order?!
    It's just slow motion chaos!!

    When you order the electrons by having specific repeating magnetic pulses, it influences them to follow an ordered wave.
    Which prevents quantum turbulence. Prevents chaos.
    Less chaos ≠ Order
    Less resistance ≠ Assistance
    Less hate ≠ Love
    Less disease ≠ Health
    Less heat ≠ Cold
    Less light ≠ Dark

    They are opposites of the same coin.
    But just because you lower 1 side doesn't automatically mean you raise the other side.

    The more chaos there is on the quantum scale, the more temperature you feel. The more radiation. And all that kinetic energy is being used up from the random absorption and emission and motion in 3 dimensions.

    Get the same electrons to flow in a wave and they will emit and absorb in sequence while all moving in the same direction as One. (Bose-Einstein Condensate)

    BECAUSE there is Order.... it is cold.
    Disorder = heat.
    Less Disorder = less heat.
    Less heat ≠ order.
    Pouring liquid nitrogen on a sample does NOT make order.
    Less heat is not the same as More cold.

    More order makes for more non-locality.
    Most of the entire universe of motion and matter is in a state of chaos. (thus why the background of space is never 0 Kelvin/ Absolute Zero. It's more around 4 Kelvin because everything is made of disordered "electrons")

    They are looking at "thermal fluctuation" as a cause of superconductivity, when it's an EFFECT of order.

    All these psyentists and nerds talking about string theory and entanglement.... and they can't even unclasp the 2 strings of a bra. haha
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    Oct 28, 2015 1:57 AM GMT
    Radd saidDo you mean "how is this NOT news?"

    I've known about this for years. Some say it's proof that our conscious creates our world.

    Since childhood I've often toyed with the idea that things in physics didn't exist until humans thought of them. Thereby creating them.

    But I think I have to reject that idea. Discovered does not equal created.

    Quantum theory not withstanding, which I've studied and perhaps understand a little, is not a Universe I much want to know.

    It's not a Universe of my tangible parts, that can ever mean very much to me. I'm Earth-bound for my limited lifetime. And while an intriguing intellectual exercise for others, I'll take the more practical approach.

    I'd rather work on how to improve our daily lives, than how to understand the stars, fascinating as they are. And where that knowledge overlaps, wonderful! But each of us have our focus, and mine is more about people, and less about physics.