Partner...? Business partner?

  • Ookami

    Posts: 76

    Nov 02, 2015 5:21 AM GMT
    Have you ever look for one? How do you know he is legit? What makes a good business partner? Where do I find one? Do friends make good business partners?

    I recently got super focus on starting a business and a friend is hardcore into it too.
    But we have been having "some" issues... Mostly that we are friends since a while and I really don't want that he gets angry at me.

    How to keep things proffessional?

    Also I'm very workaholic and he doesn't do the research we assign to him, he sometimes just say he is tired and stuff... I understand him and I might be a bad friend... But isn't "business are business"?

    I just would like that either he was devoted to it or found someone with the compromise to work on it...
    I already went on the "linkedin" thing... And... Is... I want people with passion lol
    Maybe my friend just look at the wrong stuff while looking at linkedin thing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 02, 2015 10:21 PM GMT
    It is rarely a good idea to go into business with a friend. More often than not, both the business and the friendship go up in smoke.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 03, 2015 2:08 AM GMT
    recently we had lots of issues with friends in my business stuff. Not the way to go. If you must maybe create a statement of work, contract, agreement. Nice reference is nolo.com

    unless you put a ring on it just not worth it
  • rip12

    Posts: 63

    Nov 03, 2015 2:32 AM GMT
    dont ever mix business with friendship - recipe for disaster
  • Ookami

    Posts: 76

    Nov 03, 2015 4:27 AM GMT
    Guys... I feel you all are right...
    Is just that is so hard to find someone one can believe in to share a business...
  • SilverRRCloud

    Posts: 874

    Nov 03, 2015 5:34 AM GMT
    There is probably no universal truth about it.

    I have been working in closely-knit teams for a dozen years now. A few project team members have been my friends, ex-lovers, etc.. A significant majority of them remains to be so. Few guys stopped being friends, too.

    Working together on a business project with your friends has at least one major upside: better with the devil you know than the devil you don't know.

    You know how they tick. They know how you tick. So, we all give some and take some, too.

    At the times of emergencies, the dudes you have bonded with come to your help. No one is watching the clock, and charging for every 10 min segment. You watch their backs and they watch yours, too.icon_biggrin.gif

    Friendships do not abolish hierarchies. We are buddies outside the work environment but at work, every dude knows who is calling the shots. If anyone sees that you are missing a point, they'll take you on the side and voice their thoughts. You can still decide what course of action you want to take.

    Now, starting a business project is always tricky. The guys are who they are. And we have all been endlessly drilled to achieve the most while putting in the least. So, you have to agree beforehand on the price tag for each segment that they feel like slacking away from. Hence, the dude knows that if he wants to delegate his part of work, he'll have to pay for it in real dough.

    It takes some maturity for the guys to sit around the table and agree that we are all fine with a fellow dude who wants to spend some quality time with his GF, BF, family, etc., while the others are toiling away. But he knows that he'll have to compensate the others in real money. Next time around, you need a break, and you dig in your pocket, too. Most of us really like each other a lot. But no one likes to be exploited, hence the same rules apply to everybody.

    Another point is to understand that we are all in for the money. Telling a dude, 'you can do this for me, because you are there anyway, is a lame excuse. If it is something you are supposed to do, you can, too, haul your ass there and do the footwork.

    Soon enough, guys realize that slacking away from your duties does not pay off. Since there is no free lunch for anyone, the core dudes keep on working on it. The others get sent away.

    If you are my friend and co-worker because you think that you can exploit our friendship and work relationship, think twice...

    SC
  • Ookami

    Posts: 76

    Nov 03, 2015 6:06 AM GMT
    SilverRRCloud saidThere is probably no universal truth about it.

    I have been working in closely-knit teams for a dozen years now. A few project team members have been my friends, ex-lovers, etc.. A significant majority of them remains to be so. Few guys stopped being friends, too.

    Working together on a business project with your friends has at least one major upside: better with the devil you know than the devil you don't know.

    You know how they tick. They know how you tick. So, we all give some and take some, too.

    At the times of emergencies, the dudes you have bonded with come to your help. No one is watching the clock, and charging for every 10 min segment. You watch their backs and they watch yours, too.icon_biggrin.gif

    Friendships do not abolish hierarchies. We are buddies outside the work environment but at work, every dude knows who is calling the shots. If anyone sees that you are missing a point, they'll take you on the side and voice their thoughts. You can still decide what course of action you want to take.

    Now, starting a business project is always tricky. The guys are who they are. And we have all been endlessly drilled to achieve the most while putting in the least. So, you have to agree beforehand on the price tag for each segment that they feel like slacking away from. Hence, the dude knows that if he wants to delegate his part of work, he'll have to pay for it in real dough.

    It takes some maturity for the guys to sit around the table and agree that we are all fine with a fellow dude who wants to spend some quality time with his GF, BF, family, etc., while the others are toiling away. But he knows that he'll have to compensate the others in real money. Next time around, you need a break, and you dig in your pocket, too. Most of us really like each other a lot. But no one likes to be exploited, hence the same rules apply to everybody.

    Another point is to understand that we are all in for the money. Telling a dude, 'you can do this for me, because you are there anyway, is a lame excuse. If it is something you are supposed to do, you can, too, haul your ass there and do the footwork.

    Soon enough, guys realize that slacking away from your duties does not pay off. Since there is no free lunch for anyone, the core dudes keep on working on it. The others get sent away.

    If you are my friend and co-worker because you think that you can exploit our friendship and work relationship, think twice...

    SC


    Very nice observations...
    I believe you would be an amazing business partner.
    Your friends are lucky to have you in the team and being able to separate work from frienship.
    I hope to find someone that can work with me or that my friends can leave work for work and friendship out of work.

    As you say... Work has part of it for money and survival.
  • SilverRRCloud

    Posts: 874

    Nov 03, 2015 6:36 AM GMT
    Ookami said
    SilverRRCloud saidThere is probably no universal truth about it.

    I have been working in closely-knit teams for a dozen years now. A few project team members have been my friends, ex-lovers, etc.. A significant majority of them remains to be so. Few guys stopped being friends, too.

    Working together on a business project with your friends has at least one major upside: better with the devil you know than the devil you don't know.

    You know how they tick. They know how you tick. So, we all give some and take some, too.

    At the times of emergencies, the dudes you have bonded with come to your help. No one is watching the clock, and charging for every 10 min segment. You watch their backs and they watch yours, too.icon_biggrin.gif

    Friendships do not abolish hierarchies. We are buddies outside the work environment but at work, every dude knows who is calling the shots. If anyone sees that you are missing a point, they'll take you on the side and voice their thoughts. You can still decide what course of action you want to take.

    Now, starting a business project is always tricky. The guys are who they are. And we have all been endlessly drilled to achieve the most while putting in the least. So, you have to agree beforehand on the price tag for each segment that they feel like slacking away from. Hence, the dude knows that if he wants to delegate his part of work, he'll have to pay for it in real dough.

    It takes some maturity for the guys to sit around the table and agree that we are all fine with a fellow dude who wants to spend some quality time with his GF, BF, family, etc., while the others are toiling away. But he knows that he'll have to compensate the others in real money. Next time around, you need a break, and you dig in your pocket, too. Most of us really like each other a lot. But no one likes to be exploited, hence the same rules apply to everybody.

    Another point is to understand that we are all in for the money. Telling a dude, 'you can do this for me, because you are there anyway, is a lame excuse. If it is something you are supposed to do, you can, too, haul your ass there and do the footwork.

    Soon enough, guys realize that slacking away from your duties does not pay off. Since there is no free lunch for anyone, the core dudes keep on working on it. The others get sent away.

    If you are my friend and co-worker because you think that you can exploit our friendship and work relationship, think twice...

    SC


    Very nice observations...
    I believe you would be an amazing business partner.
    Your friends are lucky to have you in the team and being able to separate work from frienship.
    I hope to find someone that can work with me or that my friends can leave work for work and friendship out of work.

    As you say... Work has part of it for money and survival.


    Thanks for the compliments!

    Yet another part of this complex equation is that none of my co-workers believes in the prevailing ideology of how we have 'love what we are doing in order to be any good at it.'

    If we loved it, we would be doing it for freeicon_rolleyes.gif.

    And frankly, there are much better things in life than toiling your life away meeting clients, sending reports, building websites, defining processes, sending invoices, keeping your books in order, and talking to your tax folks, changing three planes a day to get to your clients. Somehow, weekends in the wine country, beach vacations, luxury travel, etc., come to mind...

    Once, everybody agrees to part with this ideological crap, guys focus on the business at hand, never expecting to like it or even love it. When the going gets tough, you get your ass moving, because you know that you are doing it for the dough. No one really gets depressed, disappointed or anything.

    SC
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 03, 2015 10:46 PM GMT
    The only way to avoid business relationship issues is to have a well-crafted, fully negotiated contract that clearly sets forth everyone's expectations.
  • Ookami

    Posts: 76

    Nov 04, 2015 4:24 AM GMT
    SilverRRCloud said
    Ookami said
    SilverRRCloud saidThere is probably no universal truth about it.

    I have been working in closely-knit teams for a dozen years now. A few project team members have been my friends, ex-lovers, etc.. A significant majority of them remains to be so. Few guys stopped being friends, too.

    Working together on a business project with your friends has at least one major upside: better with the devil you know than the devil you don't know.

    You know how they tick. They know how you tick. So, we all give some and take some, too.

    At the times of emergencies, the dudes you have bonded with come to your help. No one is watching the clock, and charging for every 10 min segment. You watch their backs and they watch yours, too.icon_biggrin.gif

    Friendships do not abolish hierarchies. We are buddies outside the work environment but at work, every dude knows who is calling the shots. If anyone sees that you are missing a point, they'll take you on the side and voice their thoughts. You can still decide what course of action you want to take.

    Now, starting a business project is always tricky. The guys are who they are. And we have all been endlessly drilled to achieve the most while putting in the least. So, you have to agree beforehand on the price tag for each segment that they feel like slacking away from. Hence, the dude knows that if he wants to delegate his part of work, he'll have to pay for it in real dough.

    It takes some maturity for the guys to sit around the table and agree that we are all fine with a fellow dude who wants to spend some quality time with his GF, BF, family, etc., while the others are toiling away. But he knows that he'll have to compensate the others in real money. Next time around, you need a break, and you dig in your pocket, too. Most of us really like each other a lot. But no one likes to be exploited, hence the same rules apply to everybody.

    Another point is to understand that we are all in for the money. Telling a dude, 'you can do this for me, because you are there anyway, is a lame excuse. If it is something you are supposed to do, you can, too, haul your ass there and do the footwork.

    Soon enough, guys realize that slacking away from your duties does not pay off. Since there is no free lunch for anyone, the core dudes keep on working on it. The others get sent away.

    If you are my friend and co-worker because you think that you can exploit our friendship and work relationship, think twice...

    SC


    Very nice observations...
    I believe you would be an amazing business partner.
    Your friends are lucky to have you in the team and being able to separate work from frienship.
    I hope to find someone that can work with me or that my friends can leave work for work and friendship out of work.

    As you say... Work has part of it for money and survival.


    Thanks for the compliments!

    Yet another part of this complex equation is that none of my co-workers believes in the prevailing ideology of how we have 'love what we are doing in order to be any good at it.'

    If we loved it, we would be doing it for freeicon_rolleyes.gif.

    And frankly, there are much better things in life than toiling your life away meeting clients, sending reports, building websites, defining processes, sending invoices, keeping your books in order, and talking to your tax folks, changing three planes a day to get to your clients. Somehow, weekends in the wine country, beach vacations, luxury travel, etc., come to mind...

    Once, everybody agrees to part with this ideological crap, guys focus on the business at hand, never expecting to like it or even love it. When the going gets tough, you get your ass moving, because you know that you are doing it for the dough. No one really gets depressed, disappointed or anything.

    SC


    But... Like I love what I do... Well what I want to do...
    But isn't it loving it or not, but the time and knowledge for what one get's paid for?
  • Ookami

    Posts: 76

    Nov 04, 2015 4:28 AM GMT
    DOMINUS saidThe only way to avoid business relationship issues is to have a well-crafted, fully negotiated contract that clearly sets forth everyone's expectations.


    Yes taht's it!
    Contracts and having everyone expectations writen and in a solid and simple way...
    But how do you get everyone to be clear on what they want?
    None of my friends have ever been "straight" with me...
    I sometimes wonder if they are afraid to tell me things straight or they are just joking :l
  • SilverRRCloud

    Posts: 874

    Nov 04, 2015 4:34 AM GMT
    If you happen to love/like what you are doing, too, more power to you. If you own the business, and the proceeds of it fill your pockets, go around telling everybody how much you love what you are doing, especially if the other guys are really doing it for you and you are the chief benefactor of their work.

    If you are working for someone else? Consider toning down the all-too-positive approach. It usually transpires that you are ENJOYING doing in anyway, and would be doing it for an even lower pay, cuz you are loving it anyway. You do not want to undermine your own position.

    SC
  • Ookami

    Posts: 76

    Nov 05, 2015 6:40 AM GMT
    Well I like it, but I would like it pay my bills, just to have a bit less stress... Is like right now I'm fighthing with a tooth ache... Well more like 10 of them... But I'm broke :l

    But I understand you and well is a nice advice to take in count.