Breaking the Habit

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 02, 2015 11:40 PM GMT
    I grew up in a southern family where everything was either fried or cooked with a lot of butter. From an early age my diet was not good...now in my late 30's, I have changed quite a bit, but that craving is still there...is there a 'better' way of trying to kick the habit? I can do all the workouts I want, but I know if my diet does not change, I'll have the same problem I have now, the unwanted fat around the midsection.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 03, 2015 11:46 PM GMT
    Like any other addiction, the cravings never go away. Ever.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Nov 04, 2015 12:44 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidLike any other addiction, the cravings never go away. Ever.

    I don't think this is right. I appreciate the mindset that if you have an addiction, you need to simply overwhelm the craving with will power. But in this case, I think you can kick the desire. I had a secretary that was prone to become pudgy easily and she went on a zero fat diet when that happened. I gave it a try once but only for about a month. At the end of even that short time, the thought of eating fat was quiet nausiating. I was surprised.

    I don't recommend a zero fat diet because you need some healthy fats but I do suggest you try it for a short time and see if you have the same reaction. You will need to revise your diet to eliminate the food you grew up with permanently but you may find it easier if you try this while formulating a new, more permanent diet of healthy foods. Look at spicey foods like Indian, middle eastern, north African. They're all related because of the spice trade.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2015 5:19 AM GMT
    I'm not quite clear on what your diet is like now. I used to eat a lot of fast food, and I still have a sweet tooth that can take over if I'm not careful.

    The easiest way to make dietary changes is to take it one meal at a time adding better options into your diet without depriving yourself of anything...initially. You will need to progressively add healthy foods to your diet while cutting back on the fried foods and butter.

    I don't recommend forcing yourself to eat stuff that you really hate, even if it's good for you. Make a list of 10-15 of your favorite healthier foods and draw from that for your "replacement meal."

    Your body needs healthy fat, carbohydrates, and protein in order to function properly so don't jump on the "drop one macronutrient while overconsuming another" wagon. Educate yourself on healthier options for fats if you're unsure right now.

    Make sure you're not neglecting your micronutrients as well (vitamins and minerals). Sometimes deficiencies of those can cause weird cravings. Don't pop a pill and think you're done with it, get your micronutrients from whole food sources.

    You've really got to change your mindset to think of your food as fuel for your furnace. There's a big emotional component in people's diets, cravings, etc.

    There should be meet up groups for people who embrace healthier eating. The truth is, the standard American diet is pretty boring, adding spices (great idea on the Middle Eastern, and Indian type foods, though the way they cook can be very high calorie and fat as well), and different components from nature make very flavorful food, that may be an acquired taste initially (the standard American diet is about sugar, salt, and bad fat).

    I can say that I don't want to look at a piece of fried anything and that's about all I used to eat(well except French fries occasionally). If I do partake, I feel physically sick and bloated which I take as my body's way of telling me that it's not food fit for consumption.


  • FitBlackCuddl...

    Posts: 803

    Nov 04, 2015 5:31 AM GMT
    NashKev saidI grew up in a southern family where everything was either fried or cooked with a lot of butter. From an early age my diet was not good...now in my late 30's, I have changed quite a bit, but that craving is still there...is there a 'better' way of trying to kick the habit? I can do all the workouts I want, but I know if my diet does not change, I'll have the same problem I have now, the unwanted fat around the midsection.


    Change the butter/lard to coconut or olive oil. Still get the delicious taste but with more beneficial results for the body.
  • Buddha

    Posts: 1767

    Nov 04, 2015 11:23 AM GMT
  • oldfart

    Posts: 328

    Nov 05, 2015 1:28 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidLike any other addiction, the cravings never go away. Ever.


    I have to disagree with my esteemed colleague. I went vegetarian in my late 20s and fat lost a lot of appeal. A couple of years ago I went low card as well, and added fish back in. Now fat is like cigarettes: I don't even like the thought.

    I even found a very low fat local tortilla chip so I splurge now and then on that. Still looking for a sub for the demon rum, but not very hopeful.

    You can shift your appetitte, with patience and endurance.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 15, 2015 6:18 PM GMT
    Thanks for all the suggestions..I have actually started the process of breaking the habit...it isn't easy. I still want to gravitate towards the non healthy foods. the thing I am currently working on is realizing food is for nourishment and not for joy or comfort. Also, there are healthier options that are just as good as the higher fat/sugar/carb counterparts.

    I see the "man of the day" and many others who have worked hard and have the awesome results. My goal is to look the best that I can, pushing myself past my limitations, but within a realistic goal.

    Thanks again!
  • badbug

    Posts: 800

    Nov 17, 2015 7:22 AM GMT


    It helps if you visualize the food as what it is to you...

    Instead of seeing a can of coke as delicious, see it as more flab on your gut, or as upping your chance for diabetes.

    Instead of seeing KFC as yummy chicken, see it as a cancer risk. It bloody is.


    The more you read up on nutrition and view other success stories for motivation as you have indicated, the easier it is to re-orientate yourself with food.


    I literally can't eat potato chips now, not unless they are organic potatoes cooked in coconut oil at low temperature. I don't see them as a big bag of tasty at the store anymore, i see them as a big bag of pesticides and potential mutagens.


    Plus late 30s, is the time you have to start. Your life is literally in danger for heart disease and heart attacks and cancer.

    People like to deny how serious an issue diet and health are, because that's how we are built.


    I am not sure if you are still in your childhood environment, but i have got friends and family that are very unsupportive about my healthy eating habits.

    I am not one of those preachy types either, i tell people one time only about what is good or bad for them then i honestly don't care if they follow it or not. (unless i am dating them)


    So yeah, don't let friends or family second guess your taking your diet more seriously.

    I mean come on, what's more serious than what goes in your mouth? icon_wink.gif