If EDM is global, why does country music only have American fans?

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    Nov 05, 2015 4:04 AM GMT

    I find this fascinating and strange at the same time. Even some rock music has had its roots in European countries. The county music awards are on this week in the united states, from its home town Nashville Tennessee. I am only familiar with the genre because my mother, when she lived, was a fan, especially during the 70's and 80's.


    So why has this music genre only been a popular staple, for some americans for 48, short years? This music does not seem to resonate with other civilized countries, much like the pop Billboard 100 does. Do people in England, Spain, Germany or France listen to this?

    This music and its fans appear to be limited to the southern states with pockets within the liberal enclaves. Strange to view the recent bar addition to WeHo http://flamingsaddles.com/weho/ The young gays are quite impressionable when they first hear this type music. I was kind of force to listen to it back 30 years ago, when my mom and I would fight over the radio stations and channel changing while driving icon_lol.gif


    Country Music Association Awards
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_Music_Association_Awards

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    Nov 05, 2015 4:11 AM GMT
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    Nov 05, 2015 4:13 AM GMT

    The only song I could ever get into, coyote ugly meets the gay boys icon_razz.gif




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    Nov 05, 2015 4:15 AM GMT


    I blame the "cross over" Queens icon_rolleyes.gif



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    Nov 05, 2015 4:28 AM GMT

    This was "country music" in my youth, one of only two miss O ever did, and she is Australian




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    Nov 05, 2015 4:40 AM GMT

    I don't think Madge ever did one icon_question.gif





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    Nov 05, 2015 4:52 AM GMT


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_music
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    Nov 05, 2015 5:07 AM GMT
    bon_pan said

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_music




    Did I also say my country music fan mom was Polish!
    Yes, I can Polka dance too! which appears to be very similar to Irish folk music






    Ummm, one of those songs "from Ireland" is actually American, The Gatlin Brothers, young people will not know this





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    Nov 05, 2015 5:11 AM GMT

    ^This groups biggest hit



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    Nov 05, 2015 5:34 AM GMT
    My Mom was German and a big fan of Patsy Cline and Willie Nelson and Loretta Lynn, etc...icon_wink.gif


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    Nov 05, 2015 5:39 AM GMT



    It was "pop" when Helen did it




    It was "country" when Tanya did it



  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 05, 2015 5:46 AM GMT
    Mom said pop took the cunt out of country. Well, actually, she never said that but she didn't like modern country.
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    Nov 05, 2015 6:17 AM GMT
    bon_pan saidMom said pop took the cunt out of country. Well, actually, she never said that but she didn't like modern country.



    Yeah, my mom passed away Dec 2002 at age 65. She wasn't a fan of cross over queen Shania Twain and her 1997 hit Man I Feel Like a Woman. I don't think she even liked LeAnn Rimes, she still preferred Tanya Tucker

    Many people "get stuck" in a musical era because that is where special memories were created for them. I know people I grew up with in the 80's that still only listen to 80's music. We are of course a few decades past that and these people would have no idea who, say the band, Alice In Chains are because this band was from a different era that passed them by.

    Since the mid 70's, (about 10 years old) I myself have moved through each era or decade listening to whatever was popular in the time frame, through soft rock, pop country, disco, hard rock, glam rock, pop rap, dance, grunge, techno, house, EDM, remixing. My music library is a vast array of several genre and decades worth of music.
  • frogman89

    Posts: 418

    Nov 05, 2015 2:15 PM GMT
    ELNathB said
    I find this fascinating and strange at the same time. Even some rock music has had its roots in European countries. The county music awards are on this week in the united states, from its home town Nashville Tennessee. I am only familiar with the genre because my mother, when she lived, was a fan, especially during the 70's and 80's.


    So why has this music genre only been a popular staple, for some americans for 48, short years? This music does not seem to resonate with other civilized countries, much like the pop Billboard 100 does. Do people in England, Spain, Germany or France listen to this?

    This music and its fans appear to be limited to the southern states with pockets within the liberal enclaves. Strange to view the recent bar addition to WeHo http://flamingsaddles.com/weho/ The young gays are quite impressionable when they first hear this type music. I was kind of force to listen to it back 30 years ago, when my mom and I would fight over the radio stations and channel changing while driving icon_lol.gif


    Country Music Association Awards
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Country_Music_Association_Awards

    No.
  • tnlifter

    Posts: 76

    Nov 05, 2015 8:12 PM GMT
    I used to work in Nashville at the Country Music Hall of Fame, just a block or so from the Country Music Assn (CMA). We ALWAYS had a steady stream of fans from many countries, including England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, France, Germany, Austria, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, The Phillipines, and most of Latin America. We did a live broadcast from there to the Midlands in England and got swamped with Brits calling the museum. They knew more about the music than most Americans did. We also did a video of Bobby Bear for German TV.

    When I lived in Germany I routinely heard American and German language country music on radios, blaring from shops in areas not frequented by tourists, especially in Bayern (Bavaria).

    While living in Mexico City I found they loved American music, especially country. They were knowledgeable about it, and enjoyed it.

    Conway Twitty recorded a Russian language version of 'Hello Darling" which was released in the Soviet bloc by a cooperating agreement between Columbia(CBS) Records and Melodia (Soviet state record company, at that time the largest record company in the world). It was one of his biggest hits.

    I'm not trying to pick a fight or point out anyone, but this thread points up one of my biggest gripes about gay life. Most are so pinpoint focused on the gay world that everything in their lives must be gay, only gay music, gay businesses, gayborhoods, gay friends, etc, etc, that they miss out on the other 99% of the world that they dismiss because its not gay. Its sad to be in one of the more open times in history and not open up to it.

    All of this being said, most modern country leaves me kind of cold. Its like eating dinner in a Chinese restaurant - you can't tell when one song stops and another one starts. If you want something modern & really good, listen to Brandi Carlisle, especially 'The Eye'.
  • tnlifter

    Posts: 76

    Nov 05, 2015 9:13 PM GMT
    Btw, the CMA was established to promote country music, not to start country music. Its been around for centuries, tracing roots back primarily to the immigrants from the British Isles and western Europe. Before it was called country they referred to it as hillbilly or mountain music. 'Tom Dooley', for example, was originally 'Tom Dula' and a popular song during and after the Civil War. The tune is even older. It was recorded by the first ethnomusicologists traveling in the south and west.

    One other thing, isn't Shania Twain, like Hank Snow and Anne Murray, a Canadian? Another group that likes country music, as do many Northerners. When the Today show has a country artist, the street is just as packed as ever.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 05, 2015 9:37 PM GMT
    Country music is popular in Ireland, which makes sense since that is where country music evolved from. Irish immigrants brought their fiddles and tales of woe to the Appalachians and it evolved into country. Add in the banjo from West Africa courtesy of black people and you have the roots of country. Inexplicably, country is popular in Kenya.
    I hear it also has a following in Australia.
  • ASHDOD

    Posts: 1057

    Nov 05, 2015 9:58 PM GMT
    i think every country or some countries that have the same language and culture ,have a ''lower'' kind of music, sentimentle [ ''ho mother she left me ,my heart is broken''], popular more among the simple folk, we have it in israel, i know you have it in arab countries ,latin america, italy, and it usualy stay local.
  • ASHDOD

    Posts: 1057

    Nov 05, 2015 10:33 PM GMT
    simple repetitive melodies... ect
  • JMeezy808

    Posts: 52

    Nov 06, 2015 2:53 AM GMT
    Keith Urban, NZ born Australian. Like all types of music, you'll find someone somewhere who listens to it. It may not be the mainstream genre of that particular country but it's listened to.

    And I still believe EDM was helped to popularity by the media and "Jersey Shore". Back in the 90's you were considered a "faggot" if you listened to anything techno, in my school anyway. Until Mortal Kombat: The Movie released "Technosyndrome 7" then everyone was shouting "Mortal Kombat!"



    And one for the road...

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    Nov 06, 2015 10:31 PM GMT
    House music has roots in Europe and America where country music is predominately American. There are sub-genres of EDM like "Jersey Club" and "Melbourne Bounce" are extremely popular in their respective geological origins but aren't elsewhere. I would definitely get some looks if I played a Hardstyle track where I live. It's just not a thing here.

    Also, party music has a lot more mainstream appeal than country. A lot of people can related to getting fucked up and wanting to dance, but can't relate to a romance that is somehow related to pickup trucks.