Stroke

  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Nov 05, 2015 11:03 PM GMT
    So ... yeah..... a bit lost.

    34. And had a stroke. All the symptoms but thankfully CT scan revealed no clot or bleed.

    But fuck.

    There's something terrifying being told by a Paramedic when you cant speak "You've had a stroke; you're having a stroke. The damage is done all we can do now is recuperation".

    At 34. Someone who keeps active and eats well. icon_eek.gificon_eek.gificon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2015 11:05 PM GMT
    Sorry that happened to you. That must have been terrifying.

    Do they have any idea why that would happen to you of all people?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2015 11:11 PM GMT
    consult more than just with the Paramedics.
    any family history of this type of stuff
    any previous medical illness/trauma?
  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Nov 05, 2015 11:19 PM GMT
    I had a head trauma in 2003 which left me with a stammer, dyslexia, dyspraxia and a lopsided smile.

    My maternal Grandmama had a stroke. Heart disease and obesity runs in the male line paternally and maternally.

    Apparently this was stress induced... I dont think of myself a stressed or overworked....then again relationship stuff is stressy....very.....icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2015 11:23 PM GMT
    Big hugs buddy
    What a kick in the balls.

    You're a tough nut; already back on RJ.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2015 11:28 PM GMT
    When I saw RowingAnt had started a thread called Stroke I thought it was going to be about crew. Wow. Sorry that happened. Take care.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 05, 2015 11:47 PM GMT
    Rowing_Ant saidSo ... yeah..... a bit lost.

    34. And had a stroke. All the symptoms but thankfully CT scan revealed no clot or bleed.

    But fuck.

    There's something terrifying being told by a Paramedic when you cant speak "You've had a stroke; you're having a stroke. The damage is done all we can do now is recuperation".

    At 34. Someone who keeps active and eats well. icon_eek.gificon_eek.gificon_eek.gif

    Who treated you, and how quickly after the stroke incident? Were you in a hospital for a time? How are you today? Any residuals?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2015 12:15 AM GMT
    theantijock%20engage%20stalker%20reducti

    I'd imagine most people think of stress as a type of hyperactive state but stress also expresses as sadness and depression. They are interrelated. Stress can cause depression and depression can be quite stressful, though we might not feel "stressed" in the sense of being hyper at the time.

    How can I be stressed if I feel so down and calm. Because with sadness, the battle rages inside. All we've done is muffle the rage.

    At times of great loss, mourning loved ones can become so sad as to develop and die from a broken heart, from cardiomyopathy, which is stress induced. Sadness kills, and not just the mood of party, haha. So learn to regulate that in yourself, to not allow yourself to luxuriate too much in sadness, as difficult as life is. Find the humor even at your own expense. Laugh at even yourself as if your life depended on it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2015 12:38 AM GMT
    Rowing_Ant said I had a head trauma in 2003 which left me with a stammer, dyslexia, dyspraxia and a lopsided smile.

    Such is life, I regret to confirm. I had a very serious head trauma in 1968 when I was 19. That gave me a stutter (stammer), slight dyslexia I still have today (you see it in my threads here all the time, that some claim prove I'm an alcoholic), and a droopy left eyelid. The worst thing was I lost my ability to play the piano. The effects were sorta stroke-like, similar to yours.

    Sometimes, when I'm kinda feeling low, I play the digital transcription of my performance of the Schubert Wanderer Fantasy, recorded in 1968, my favorite solo piano piece. And I just cry and cry and cry.

    I was so depressed after the accident, which also disfigured my face and dropped my IQ at least 50 points, I attempted suicide twice. But being a coward I didn't go through with it.

    So I enlisted in the Army. I figured the Vietcong would kill me instead, and I'd be remembered as a hero. Well, that never happened. I've got rows of medals, but not any because I died in combat.

    Ironically I found I loved the Army. One door closes and another opens. And while on duty I went to college. and took a degree in Speech & Phonetics, among others. Which helped me to fix my remaining speech defects.

    That becoming a leader in the Army had already done a lot to correct. When you're ordered to speak to a large group of soldiers, and your career depends upon it, that's a good motivator.

    I've got a lot of empathy for you. And perhaps could privately tell you the uplifting story of my husband, who's had 2 major strokes, right in front of me. And who nobody today even suspects ever had any strokes at all. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Nov 06, 2015 12:52 AM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    Rowing_Ant saidSo ... yeah..... a bit lost.

    34. And had a stroke. All the symptoms but thankfully CT scan revealed no clot or bleed.

    But fuck.

    There's something terrifying being told by a Paramedic when you cant speak "You've had a stroke; you're having a stroke. The damage is done all we can do now is recuperation".

    At 34. Someone who keeps active and eats well. icon_eek.gificon_eek.gificon_eek.gif

    Who treated you, and how quickly after the stroke incident? Were you in a hospital for a time? How are you today? Any residuals?


    Salford Royal. Was taken in by Ambulance with Blues and Twos from work. Id had the stroke I think the night before - pain in my head, lopsdided body and face; paralysis; slurred speach; lolling tongue etc...... confused in the morning. Not sure if I was going to work or coming home. That kinda thing. Turned up to work. Told I looked awful. In a mess. Saw first aider. Lopsided, numb face and body rang alarm bells. Hello Ambulance. Hello A&E......ECG, CT scan, bloods taken.

    No evidence of a clot or bleed on the CT but am now an outpatient and being referred for an MRI
    heart healthy
    lungs healthy
    BP OK; cholesterol all ok.

    Stress induced.

    Just watch out for the symptoms guys in yourself and your loved ones. Its terrifying.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2015 3:27 AM GMT
    Hugs to you, Rowing and I hope you'll make a full recovery.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2015 4:10 AM GMT
    Sounds scary.

    Hang in there. We're all thinking of you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2015 4:36 AM GMT
    Rowing_Ant said
    Just watch out for the symptoms guys in yourself and your loved ones. Its terrifying.

    OK, thanks. Now here's my husband's double stroke story, with some insights on this issue.

    We had been at Homo Depot one morning, he was fine. And he went up to our condo, while I stayed fussing around with the car. A few minutes later my cell phone rang, and his voice was all distorted. I raced upstairs.

    He was on the floor with his right side non-responsive. His speech was barely understandable. He had managed to grab his cell phone to call me.

    I instantly knew what it was, and dialed 911 to tell them this was a stroke patient. The EMS arrived within 5 minutes. I swear I could hear the siren coming as I was putting my phone back in my pocket, the station is walking distance.

    At the ER the doctors asked me when the stroke had hit. It was critical to know, because they have different treatment protocols, depending on the timeline. If the patient arrives within the "golden hour" they can use more aggressive treatment.

    I was puzzled at first, and then I remembered my cell phone. I showed the doctor when I got his call in my phone history, which was 5 minutes after he went upstairs. And when I called 911 after another 5 minutes. And fortunately the EMS arrived quickly, as evidenced by his now already being in the ER.

    The doctor said great, they rarely get that kind of hard confirmation of the stroke timeline. It was only 40 minutes at that point. They could use more aggressive treatment.

    In the next hour he started to recover. He was coming out of it. And then he had another stroke, right in front of me. I called for the doctors.

    They worked on him, and brought him into the ICU. But he rallied again. Subsequent MRI scans showed he had 2 large clots in his brain. These were not TIAs, but major strokes. But they were dissolved quickly, before permanent damage happened.

    The second one cleared, too, and a week later he left the hospital under his own power. And today at 81 he has no residuals. No mobility issues, no speech issues, no droopy face, nothing. He's like he was before the strokes ever hit him.

    Of course I'm totally evil, and when we talk to others about this, I'll say: "Any speech impediment you hear today is because he's an Italian from Boston".

    ***SMACK***

    ROFL

    The important message is that strokes are not always the permanently debilitating condition commonly assumed, subject to the variables of how massive they are and where they strike. Quick detection and treatment can result in no lasting residuals at all. Even in someone as old as my husband. Yet another good reason to live with a guy, who'll be your Guardian Angel, as you will be his.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2015 7:36 AM GMT
    The MRI may be able to tell you what's going on. I imagine that they will scan your head as well as your neck and then follow up with a neurologist.

    The paramedics were wrong to tell you that you were having a stroke because:

    1. Only a doctor can diagnose a stroke, not a paramedic.
    2. A radiologist will confirm the diagnosis thru images such as CT and MRI.

    That really sucks that you were scared into thinking you had a stroke by someone who has no qualifications to do so. Hope your MRI is clean and you get to the bottom on what happened.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2015 2:06 PM GMT
    So sorry to hear that.Have you been under an unusual amount of stress lately?God bless you and grant you a full recovery.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2015 2:56 PM GMT
    Forgive the threadjack, but, um.....

    southbeach1500 saidSorry you're now having to deal with this Rowing_Ant. I must say, I didn't notice that you had a stammer when you and I spoke on the phone about foreskin restoration a few years ago.


    Did you just use this guy's brush with death to promote foreskin? lololol Wow, that's pretty low. Who would have guessed there's a basement under your rock. I presume from here we can expect you to be fracking for new opportunities of depravity? Yikes!
  • FitBlackCuddl...

    Posts: 803

    Nov 06, 2015 4:01 PM GMT
    Rowing_Ant saidSo ... yeah..... a bit lost.

    34. And had a stroke. All the symptoms but thankfully CT scan revealed no clot or bleed.

    But fuck.

    There's something terrifying being told by a Paramedic when you cant speak "You've had a stroke; you're having a stroke. The damage is done all we can do now is recuperation".

    At 34. Someone who keeps active and eats well. />


    Has it been explained to you how the stroke happened?
  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Nov 06, 2015 4:14 PM GMT
    Stress.SOmething in my brain apparently literally popped. lol.

    Which is odd, as the CT scans shows no sign of a bleed or a clot......and other than forgetting some words. I am A OK.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2015 5:43 PM GMT
    Everyone should know about and tell their relatives abut tPA, an expensive IV treatment that Obamacare, Medicare and Insurance companies don't want to pay for when the start time of the stroke is unknown:

    tPA, the Gold Standard
    The only FDA approved treatment for ischemic strokes is tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, also known as IV rtPA, given through an IV in the arm). tPA works by dissolving the clot and improving blood flow to the part of the brain being deprived of blood flow. If administered within 3 hours(and up to 4.5 hours in certain eligible patients), tPA may improve the chances of recovering from a stroke. A significant number of stroke victims don’t get to the hospital in time for tPA treatment; this is why it’s so important to identify a stroke immediately.


    http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/AboutStroke/Treatment/Stroke-Treatments_UCM_310892_Article.jsp#.VjzjVse3uM8

    Tell your relatives and significant others to offer to pay for tPA when the Doctor resists due to an unknown start time of the stroke.

    A 2011 study found that the typical cost of treatment with tPA is $2,200.

    Obamacare, Medicare and Insurance companies are betting you die from the stroke instead of paying for tPA.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 06, 2015 6:58 PM GMT
    Hope you are on the road to recovery.
  • metta

    Posts: 39146

    Nov 06, 2015 7:10 PM GMT
    Rowing_Ant saidStress.SOmething in my brain apparently literally popped. lol.

    Which is odd, as the CT scans shows no sign of a bleed or a clot......and other than forgetting some words. I am A OK.


    Glad to hear it was not more serious. What does the doc recommend that you do?

    You might want to consider doing meditation and breathing techniques to help you deal with stress. Make sure that you get a full night of sleep at night.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 07, 2015 3:23 AM GMT
    southbeach1500 saidAny other questions Mr. Angry?


    Oh, just one. Do you always mention a person's foreskin when their immediate concern is a cerebrovascular incident?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 07, 2015 5:44 AM GMT
    Very sorry to hear. I wish you a speedy recovery. I'm curious, did they diagnose you as having a stroke based on symptoms alone? If everything appeared normal, how did they decide it was a stroke vs a seizure or some other "event"?
  • Rowing_Ant

    Posts: 1504

    Nov 07, 2015 11:56 AM GMT
    Ive been told to rest, rest rest, recouperate. Lots of sleep. Cut down on caffeine.

    Im making a list of those things I can ditch and those things in my life which are nourishing.

    I didnt think I was stressed....but I gues living with my ex and seeing someone long distance (who actually fucking broke up with me on Friday - after Id just got out of hospital!!!!), working, writing three books...spending 70 mins a day in the gym......takes it's toll.

    Right now I just want to sleep and have cuddles. Just that human contact.....to be told it's all alright. I keep forgetting words and randomly dropping things.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 07, 2015 1:24 PM GMT
    mx5guynj saidEveryone should know about and tell their relatives abut tPA, an expensive IV treatment that Obamacare, Medicare and Insurance companies don't want to pay for when the start time of the stroke is unknown:

    tPA, the Gold Standard
    The only FDA approved treatment for ischemic strokes is tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, also known as IV rtPA, given through an IV in the arm). tPA works by dissolving the clot and improving blood flow to the part of the brain being deprived of blood flow. If administered within 3 hours(and up to 4.5 hours in certain eligible patients), tPA may improve the chances of recovering from a stroke. A significant number of stroke victims don’t get to the hospital in time for tPA treatment; this is why it’s so important to identify a stroke immediately.


    http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/AboutStroke/Treatment/Stroke-Treatments_UCM_310892_Article.jsp#.VjzjVse3uM8

    Tell your relatives and significant others to offer to pay for tPA when the Doctor resists due to an unknown start time of the stroke.

    A 2011 study found that the typical cost of treatment with tPA is $2,200.

    Obamacare, Medicare and Insurance companies are betting you die from the stroke instead of paying for tPA.

    That's exactly what I authorized my husband to receive, I'd forgotten the term. (We have full "Health Care Surrogate" medical authority over each other)

    But the doctor wouldn't allow it unless he had good evidence of the stroke timeline, which many people can't provide, especially the patient themselves when admitted alone. Otherwise he said he wouldn't attempt the procedure. With this new information in the thread I wonder if it had more to do with funding authorization protocols, than with the medical danger he led me to believe. icon_question.gif

    Fortunately my cell phone had the call date/time stamps of the event, plus my own first-hand evidence, so the doctor was satisfied and approved the procedure, as I described in a post above. And thank gawd we have prompt & professional EMS response in our "gay ghetto", with major hospitals no more than 5 miles from us. My husband was getting this treatment in the hospital ER 40 minutes after the stroke hit him. And today no one can believe he ever had a stroke. icon_biggrin.gif