Gym or Crossfit for alternative days to running

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 09, 2015 6:27 AM GMT
    Hey guys...

    I run three time a week and I'm looking for an alternative for the other days: Mostly to get the chest/arms toned, but also to not "just" focus on the lower body. I wondered, do you have any experiences with either Crossfit, which seems quite taxing and "all round" but social?

    Or am I better off going to a regular gym and train there?

    That said, I tend to travel lots, so finding a gym isn't always that easy. But no idea about finding Crossfit boxes?
  • toybrian

    Posts: 395

    Nov 09, 2015 4:40 PM GMT
    Steph, hope you get some good answers to this because I have been wondering the same thing.
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    Nov 09, 2015 4:46 PM GMT
    Why do you run? If it is to burn fat it is a very inefficient way to accomplish that. Cross fit is "taxing" but that is what builds muscle rather than the skinny fat result of low stress running. Try running stairs to cut your work out time and improve your fitness level. Or switch your workout to one that is core based.
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    Nov 09, 2015 5:46 PM GMT
    Try boxing.
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    Nov 09, 2015 6:02 PM GMT
    Stephx saidHey guys...

    I run three time a week and I'm looking for an alternative for the other days: Mostly to get the chest/arms toned, but also to not "just" focus on the lower body. I wondered, do you have any experiences with either Crossfit, which seems quite taxing and "all round" but social?

    Or am I better off going to a regular gym and train there?

    That said, I tend to travel lots, so finding a gym isn't always that easy. But no idea about finding Crossfit boxes?


    I wouldn't really look to Crossfit to supplement your cardio routine (running). It's an all-around program that includes HIIT cardio training (including running). And, in my experience, it's programmed for you to go regularly and consecutively to build up both strength and endurance methodically. I enjoy running so do Crossfit five days a week, all consecutively, take off day 6, and run 5-10K on day 7. I think more running than that wouldn't be beneficial. Also, it's too expensive to use as a supplement. Better to get a personal trainer to give you direction at a cheaper gym, working off your running program.

    Just my opinion, and it's very subjective.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Nov 09, 2015 8:14 PM GMT
    I'd say if you love running, keep running but balance it with gym/weightlifting. Just skip the legs day in the gym. Runners do have a tendency to look a bit anorexic and beyond that, it just feels good to lift and is nice to be in a group setting (with a dose of eye candy). I get in periods when I'm traveling a lot, too, but have found most city hotels have privileges with a nearby gym which I prefer over most in-hotel gyms although some have a decent set of dumbbells and a bench (which is enough). If not, you can always do the tried and true, sit-ups and pushups. Your gym routine doesn't need to be etched in stone, just pick up where you left off when last there. The results will come.
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    Nov 10, 2015 3:33 AM GMT
    Stephx saidHey guys...

    I run three time a week and I'm looking for an alternative for the other days: Mostly to get the chest/arms toned, but also to not "just" focus on the lower body. I wondered, do you have any experiences with either Crossfit, which seems quite taxing and "all round" but social?

    Or am I better off going to a regular gym and train there?

    That said, I tend to travel lots, so finding a gym isn't always that easy. But no idea about finding Crossfit boxes?


    Many CrossFit boxes have programs that focus on a specific weight group on a particular day and then they end with a "wod" (work out of the day) that is a bit more all encompassing/full body workout. I do CrossFit because I like the fact that I don't have to think once I get to the gym - the programming is laid out and it's intense - and probably more intense than if I were to do it on my own (and there's the plus side of generally seeing decent um scenery).

    I travel a lot as well and my partner and I like visiting CrossFit boxes when we do. I've seen several boxes that have plans that let you go two, three or unlimited times a week - so I don't think that should be an impediment.

    When I travel, I usually look for a box on google maps - but here's the official map of CrossFit boxes that are current on their dues:
    https://map.crossfit.com/

    Usually there are more than a few boxes near where the hotel I travel to so I do a quick check on Facebook (many seem to have more content on their Facebook pages than even their own webpages) for which one I might want to go to the most. The cost when we travel is about $20-25 which is about the same as the cost of drop ins at a regular gym.
  • muscle32va

    Posts: 1

    Nov 10, 2015 11:09 AM GMT
    I'd suggest trying ClassPass for a month or two vs. Crossfit. Not sure about London, but I've seen Crossfit boxes pop up as options on Classpass so you could try those along with the various other offerings they have.
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    Nov 11, 2015 2:54 AM GMT
    Stephx saidHey guys...

    I run three time a week and I'm looking for an alternative for the other days: Mostly to get the chest/arms toned, but also to not "just" focus on the lower body. I wondered, do you have any experiences with either Crossfit, which seems quite taxing and "all round" but social?

    Or am I better off going to a regular gym and train there?

    That said, I tend to travel lots, so finding a gym isn't always that easy. But no idea about finding Crossfit boxes?

    I don't think crossfit is what you're looking for. There's a lot time/social commitment involved. If you travel a lot, I would suggest bodyweight exercises. Very minimal to no equipment required. When you're out traveling, just find a park or playground with pullup bars and parallel bars.
    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=bodyweight+exercises
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    Nov 11, 2015 7:55 AM GMT
    My concern would be to give yourself sufficient recovery time.

    Most or many young runners run every day and I read somewhere that when you get older that you should change to every other day. The age they gave was 55 I think, but that's just a magic number they pulled out of a hat since I doubt if it's been researched.

    I like xrichx's idea of doing bodyweight exercises. That's kind of what I do; standing shrugs, bent over shrugs, standing flys for my deltoids, with dumbbells, and I finish with some squats, usually just bodyweight. I do these before my runs. I run every other day (i.e. 7 days out of 2 weeks).

    We hear of so many runners having and recovering from overtraining injuries so you should listen to your body and make your focus on being able to run for the rest of your life.
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    Nov 11, 2015 11:23 AM GMT
    Thanks everyone for the replies! Really helped to clarify things ! icon_lol.gif
  • ardeerd

    Posts: 35

    Nov 12, 2015 4:44 AM GMT
    If you're going to try Cross Fit, just be careful. Cross Fit uses a lot of olympic lifts (or modified olympic lifts?). It's totally safe if done correctly, but, in my opinion, there's a higher risk of injury v. other types of lifting because some of the lifts need to be done with really good form (clean, jerk, snatch).

    I know a lot of people who do Cross Fit and some have seen awesome results as far as toning and weight loss. However, I will say, none of the people I know are in as good shape as people I know who are equally dedicated to traditional lifts. That's just been my experience, doesn't mean it's always the case. It's also kind of a cult, but if you're a runner, you're used to that sort of thing! jk icon_lol.gif

    My vote is regular gym, but I'm a powerlifter, so I'm biased icon_smile.gif
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    Nov 25, 2015 8:16 PM GMT
    ardeerd saidIf you're going to try Cross Fit, just be careful. Cross Fit uses a lot of olympic lifts (or modified olympic lifts?). It's totally safe if done correctly, but, in my opinion, there's a higher risk of injury v. other types of lifting because some of the lifts need to be done with really good form (clean, jerk, snatch).

    I know a lot of people who do Cross Fit and some have seen awesome results as far as toning and weight loss. However, I will say, none of the people I know are in as good shape as people I know who are equally dedicated to traditional lifts. That's just been my experience, doesn't mean it's always the case. It's also kind of a cult, but if you're a runner, you're used to that sort of thing! jk icon_lol.gif

    My vote is regular gym, but I'm a powerlifter, so I'm biased icon_smile.gif


    That can't possibly be a fact, since "in shape" is completely subjective. But I read that and pretty much discounted everything else you wrote, as I assumed it must all have the same single-sided perspective. Oh yea, you're a "powerlifter" so you're biased.
  • Triggerman

    Posts: 528

    Nov 27, 2015 3:01 AM GMT
    There are four quads to complete fitness.

    Linear loaded, Linear Unloaded, Movement Loaded, Movement Unloaded.

    Linear loaded: Running straight forward on a trail

    Linear unloaded: Running on a tread mill

    Movement loaded: Wood chops with a weighted ball

    Movement unloaded: Yoga or any bodyweight movement without external resistance.

    Everyone will work in their own quad mostly but fitness requires all four.

    Linear refers to working in one plane of motion either sagittal, frontal or transverse.

    Most guys work in one plane of motion: Runners in the sagittal plane. Forward and backwards motions. Not loaded meaning just bodyweight.

    Body builders work in one plane of motion but with an external weight. Squat, bench, curls, all in the sagittal front back plane. Or Frontal plane to the side. Side laterals.

    Yoga: Unloaded but multiplane; Sideways, front, back, left and right. But only bodyweight.

    Multiplane loaded: Twist with a medicine ball, woodchoppers with cables. Kettle bell sit ups.

    Most guys are really good in one plane.