Life in Telaviv Today - "There's An Arab Living in Our Building! We Have to do Something!"

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 09, 2015 10:58 PM GMT
    Gay Palestinian lives in his apartment for years with his Jewish partner. Suddenly, a neighbor nails a note on the building door:
    "Due to the security situation, I don’t think we can allow ourselves to be indifferent and do nothing about the fact that there is an Arab residing in our building. His name is Ziyad Abul Hawa and he lives in apartment 4."

    The gay resident thinks his neighbor never would have known there was a Palestinian living in the building, except that two years ago, he put his distinctly Arab name on his mailbox, because his mail was not being delivered. He said that "people say keep saying, 'You don’t look like an Arab.' Like it’s a compliment."

    Shouldn't surprise anyone if they soon start stenciling red crescents on Palestinian doors.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-11-09/he-came-home-find-note-about-arab-him-living-his-tel-aviv-apartment-building-so Ziyad Abul Hawa
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    Nov 10, 2015 1:41 PM GMT
    On the positive side at least the the note didn't say that there was a gay guy in the building that something needed to be done about.

    #alwayslookforthesilverlining
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    Nov 10, 2015 4:52 PM GMT
    Life in Telaviv Today - "There's An Arab Living in Our Building! We Have to do Something!"

    Perhaps the correct "do something" is to get rid of the person who nailed the note.
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    Nov 10, 2015 5:04 PM GMT
    ^ What would really be cool is if everyone else in the building sent flowers, welcome notes, cakes, house warming gifts, dinner invitations, and the like to the guy since his address was so kindly provided.
  • ASHDOD

    Posts: 1057

    Nov 10, 2015 7:48 PM GMT
    this guy who posted that was moked and ridiculed at every media possible in israel.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Nov 11, 2015 12:24 AM GMT
    HikerSkier saidGay Palestinian lives in his apartment for years with his Jewish partner. Suddenly, a neighbor nails a note on the building door:
    "Due to the security situation, I don’t think we can allow ourselves to be indifferent and do nothing about the fact that there is an Arab residing in our building. His name is Ziyad Abul Hawa and he lives in apartment 4."

    The gay resident thinks his neighbor never would have known there was a Palestinian living in the building, except that two years ago, he put his distinctly Arab name on his mailbox, because his mail was not being delivered. He said that "people say keep saying, 'You don’t look like an Arab.' Like it’s a compliment."

    Shouldn't surprise anyone if they soon start stenciling red crescents on Palestinian doors.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-11-09/he-came-home-find-note-about-arab-him-living-his-tel-aviv-apartment-building-so Ziyad Abul Hawa


    When I tried to follow the link, I got the "Page Not Found (404)" message.
  • Patrocles

    Posts: 23

    Nov 12, 2015 4:24 AM GMT
    hey Hiker,
    stop falling for propaganda BS and most of all stop spreading it. If you're so critical of this, first go and live in Tel Aviv yourself and see how it is first hand. Then also taste life under constant threat of being killed by a terrorist. When you have done it then pass your judgement, but for now keep this BS to yourself and try to attract attention here by posting smarter things
  • GayvyCrockett

    Posts: 1

    Nov 12, 2015 5:59 AM GMT
    I've lived in Ramallah, Palestine and in Tel Aviv, Israel. I love Tel Aviv. I've had amazing experiences there. I've also gone into shelters when missile sirens went off, and I've heard the sonic boom of the Iron Dome deflecting rockets. I've spoken to people who've lost people they care about in terrorist attacks. I cannot fathom the pain that these people face everyday. Nor can I defend murdering innocent civilians.
    But that doesn't blind me to the deep injustice and dehumanization that Palestinians face everyday living under occupation. While Israelis are living in fear presently due to the current security situation (hence the world actually caring about what's happening for now), Palestinians live their whole lives in fear: fear of house demolitions, the usurpation of their land, separations from loved ones due to administrative detentions, losing their children when IDF forces use live fire on demonstrations, being killed in "price tag" attacks, closed borders that will separate them from their families or livelihoods, the list goes on. You can blame the recent wave of violence on Palestinian leadership incitement, and sure, that's probably partly true. But at the most fundamental level, this--and all the conflicts that have occurred and will continue to occur between Israelis and Palestinians--are about the occupation. Until the occupation ends, the violence will not. Is it a sure bet that an end to the occupation will end violence? Of course not. But without its end, there is no hope.
    Danny Seidemann, executive director of the Israeli organization Terrestrial Jerusalem, summarized this hopelessness of occupation more eloquently than I can: "We are now witnessing a stage of occupation, particularly under this new government, in which occupation is metastasizing. It is aggressive, and you're seeing 15-, 16-year-old kids going up in front of border patrol police and provocatively baring their chests, as if to say, 'Go ahead, shoot me.' There's a lot of machismo and play-acting in this, but it's basically saying, 'What do we have to lose?'... It is the sense that we are dust. We don't count, and nobody gives a shit about us. By the way, that is not limited to official Israel. Much of the same is felt toward the Palestinian leaders and the rest of the Arab world. When you take those together, you take the religion, the despair, and the lack of a political horizon, you've got a perfect storm, and that's what's been happening." (http://www.vox.com/2015/10/20/9568145/jerusalem-israel-palestine-danny-seidemann)
    Maybe these opinions I'm expressing will lead you to think I am anti-Israel. I am not. Maybe they will lead you to call me anti-Semitic. I am not. Maybe you'll simply think I'm naive and too passive. Perhaps this is true. I certainly have a lot to learn about this situation. Nevertheless, I can recognize an unsustainable, unjust situation when I see it, and recognize that it needs to end.
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    Nov 12, 2015 8:01 PM GMT
    Patrocles saidhey Hiker,
    stop falling for propaganda BS and most of all stop spreading it. If you're so critical of this, first go and live in Tel Aviv yourself and see how it is first hand. Then also taste life under constant threat of being killed by a terrorist. When you have done it then pass your judgement, but for now keep this BS to yourself and try to attract attention here by posting smarter things


    Your repsonse is idiotic. You attack me for reporting an event, but you don't even deny the truth of the news story. I haven't "fallen for propaganda." I was reporting what was broadcast on a national NPR news show - heard by many millions of Americans throughout the USA. There is no reason to believe it was inaccurate. I have never been to Israel, and I have no intention of ever going (I doubt that there will be peace between the Israelis and the Palestinians within my lifetime), but what I have read in recent years had led me to believe that Tel Aviv residents had a much more moderate, civilized attitude toward Arab-Israelis, because there has been little disturbance there in recent years. I was surprised that this would happen in Tel Aviv (as opposed to Jerusalem). The note that said, "There is an Arab living in the building," (and we better do something about it), sounded a lot like the very common cries to action in suburban areas of the USA in the 1950's, "A house on X Street was just bought by blacks!", or "N#ggers are moving in - somebody sold out to them." Just because they were black - no thought given to the fact that the black neighbors to be might be middle class like they were. The automatic assumption that the presence of a black person was dangerous, and would lead to evil doings. I understand that the Arab guy who was the subject of the note was an Israeli citizen , and married to (or partnered with) another Israeli.
  • Buddha

    Posts: 1765

    Nov 13, 2015 7:48 AM GMT
    Aren't Israelis also considered to be Arabs?
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    Nov 14, 2015 8:42 PM GMT
    Buddha saidAren't Israelis also considered to be Arabs?


    Well, they certainly would not consider themselves Arabs - the thought would make most of them gag. But true, Israelis who have descended from those that lived in the middle east, and Arabs, are both semites. A very large percentage of Israelis (most?) descend from people who came from Europe and Russia. Wikipedia would probably provide more detailed statistic. Israel also happens to contain a large number of Arabs who are also Israeli citizens.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4862

    Nov 14, 2015 8:59 PM GMT
    GayvyCrockett saidI've lived in Ramallah, Palestine and in Tel Aviv, Israel. I love Tel Aviv. I've had amazing experiences there. I've also gone into shelters when missile sirens went off, and I've heard the sonic boom of the Iron Dome deflecting rockets. I've spoken to people who've lost people they care about in terrorist attacks. I cannot fathom the pain that these people face everyday. Nor can I defend murdering innocent civilians.
    But that doesn't blind me to the deep injustice and dehumanization that Palestinians face everyday living under occupation. While Israelis are living in fear presently due to the current security situation (hence the world actually caring about what's happening for now), Palestinians live their whole lives in fear: fear of house demolitions, the usurpation of their land, separations from loved ones due to administrative detentions, losing their children when IDF forces use live fire on demonstrations, being killed in "price tag" attacks, closed borders that will separate them from their families or livelihoods, the list goes on. You can blame the recent wave of violence on Palestinian leadership incitement, and sure, that's probably partly true. But at the most fundamental level, this--and all the conflicts that have occurred and will continue to occur between Israelis and Palestinians--are about the occupation. Until the occupation ends, the violence will not. Is it a sure bet that an end to the occupation will end violence? Of course not. But without its end, there is no hope.
    Danny Seidemann, executive director of the Israeli organization Terrestrial Jerusalem, summarized this hopelessness of occupation more eloquently than I can: "We are now witnessing a stage of occupation, particularly under this new government, in which occupation is metastasizing. It is aggressive, and you're seeing 15-, 16-year-old kids going up in front of border patrol police and provocatively baring their chests, as if to say, 'Go ahead, shoot me.' There's a lot of machismo and play-acting in this, but it's basically saying, 'What do we have to lose?'... It is the sense that we are dust. We don't count, and nobody gives a shit about us. By the way, that is not limited to official Israel. Much of the same is felt toward the Palestinian leaders and the rest of the Arab world. When you take those together, you take the religion, the despair, and the lack of a political horizon, you've got a perfect storm, and that's what's been happening." (http://www.vox.com/2015/10/20/9568145/jerusalem-israel-palestine-danny-seidemann)
    Maybe these opinions I'm expressing will lead you to think I am anti-Israel. I am not. Maybe they will lead you to call me anti-Semitic. I am not. Maybe you'll simply think I'm naive and too passive. Perhaps this is true. I certainly have a lot to learn about this situation. Nevertheless, I can recognize an unsustainable, unjust situation when I see it, and recognize that it needs to end.


    That is a very good post. It is similar to what I have understood from reading various sources.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 14, 2015 9:04 PM GMT
    why all these shitty mercy queens don't cry about injustice and wrong doings of people suffering in arabic countries, yet they always cry about peoples lives in modern democracies where everyone has 100 times more freedom and human rights than arabic shitholes do? Go to arabic countries and preach your whiny novels, pretty sure you will be either arrested or put to death


    And I fully support Israels right to protect their values against violent muslim countries and ideology that is all around them, Europe should have done the same
  • Guido4real69

    Posts: 87

    Nov 14, 2015 9:09 PM GMT
    HikerSkier said
    Buddha saidAren't Israelis also considered to be Arabs?


    Well, they certainly would not consider themselves Arabs - the thought would make most of them gag. But true, Israelis who have descended from those that lived in the middle east, and Arabs, are both semites. A very large percentage of Israelis (most?) descend from people who came from Europe and Russia. Wikipedia would probably provide more detailed statistic. Israel also happens to contain a large number of Arabs who are also Israeli citizens.
    wrong , it's 50%. Half the Jews are middle eastern .
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    Nov 14, 2015 9:47 PM GMT
    It's a pity that the link does not seem to be working. The original story, which was on the PRI radio program "The World" went on to describe how the Palestinian citizen of Israel (a gay man living in a mostly Jewish neighborhood in Tel Aviv with his Jewish Israeli partner) made a selfie with the racist note that an anonymous neighbor had tacked up in their apartment building. The point of the story -- and an uplifting one at that --- was that the Facebook post went viral and there was a massive demonstration of support for him and the meeting that had been called by the anonymous racist neighbor never ended up taking place.
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    Nov 14, 2015 10:16 PM GMT
    duluthrunner saidIt's a pity that the link does not seem to be working. The original story, which was on the PRI radio program "The World" went on to describe how the Palestinian citizen of Israel (a gay man living in a mostly Jewish neighborhood in Tel Aviv with his Jewish Israeli partner) made a selfie with the racist note that an anonymous neighbor had tacked up in their apartment building. The point of the story -- and an uplifting one at that --- was that the Facebook post went viral and there was a massive demonstration of support for him and the meeting that had been called by the anonymous racist neighbor never ended up taking place.

    I guess I missed the point you speak of - I did not listen to the end of the broadcast. I'm glad people rallied to the Arab's defense.
  • Guido4real69

    Posts: 87

    Nov 14, 2015 10:57 PM GMT
    HikerSkier said
    duluthrunner saidIt's a pity that the link does not seem to be working. The original story, which was on the PRI radio program "The World" went on to describe how the Palestinian citizen of Israel (a gay man living in a mostly Jewish neighborhood in Tel Aviv with his Jewish Israeli partner) made a selfie with the racist note that an anonymous neighbor had tacked up in their apartment building. The point of the story -- and an uplifting one at that --- was that the Facebook post went viral and there was a massive demonstration of support for him and the meeting that had been called by the anonymous racist neighbor never ended up taking place.

    I guess I missed the point you speak of - I did not listen to the end of the broadcast. I'm glad people rallied to the Arab's defense.
    it's ok to be gay in Israel .
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    Nov 14, 2015 11:10 PM GMT
    Guido4real69 said
    HikerSkier said
    duluthrunner saidIt's a pity that the link does not seem to be working. The original story, which was on the PRI radio program "The World" went on to describe how the Palestinian citizen of Israel (a gay man living in a mostly Jewish neighborhood in Tel Aviv with his Jewish Israeli partner) made a selfie with the racist note that an anonymous neighbor had tacked up in their apartment building. The point of the story -- and an uplifting one at that --- was that the Facebook post went viral and there was a massive demonstration of support for him and the meeting that had been called by the anonymous racist neighbor never ended up taking place.

    I guess I missed the point you speak of - I did not listen to the end of the broadcast. I'm glad people rallied to the Arab's defense.
    it's ok to be gay in Israel .


    Gay, yes - but muslim? Not quite so certain.
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    Nov 15, 2015 4:00 AM GMT
    ^
    @ Guido4real69 -
    You don't know what a fuckin Nazi is Guido. My Jewish relatives wouldn't agree with your name calling - but what do they know? You're a little bit short on the intellectual capacity to understand the concepts written in this thread. But it's too bad for the rest of us that you weren't around in Germany in 1943, and met a real Nazi in the flesh - they didn't like gays, either.