Now How Do We Show Solidarity With Beirut, Lebanon?

  • metta

    Posts: 39146

    Nov 16, 2015 6:49 AM GMT
    Now How Do We Show Solidarity With Beirut?


    http://reverbpress.com/news/international/beirut-lebanon-terrorist-attack/
  • metta

    Posts: 39146

    Nov 16, 2015 6:51 AM GMT
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  • metta

    Posts: 39146

    Nov 16, 2015 7:06 AM GMT
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  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1051

    Nov 16, 2015 1:53 PM GMT
    It's a little late for that - we allowed Syria to harass and interfere in Lebanon for the past two decades.
  • metta

    Posts: 39146

    Nov 16, 2015 3:24 PM GMT
    Beirut mourns its dead; weathers comparisons to Paris


    http://www.cnn.com/2015/11/16/middleeast/beirut-explosions/
  • metta

    Posts: 39146

    Nov 16, 2015 3:27 PM GMT
    Beirut bombing: Lebanese authorities arrest 11 people, mostly Syrians, over twin bombings


    http://www.cnn.com/2015/11/16/middleeast/beirut-explosions/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 16, 2015 4:50 PM GMT
    theantijock%20engage%20stalker%20reducti

    I might be wrong in my feelings but there's just something about how a person/country/religion might feel about me as to how I might feel about them. Intellectually, I can divorce myself from that. As I self-identify, I can step away from that--see myself as in the world not of the world--but then there's the reality that I do have feelings and they do get hurt, whether or not my feelings are illusionary.

    So while Lebanon has progressed more so than probably any other Arab state that I'm aware of on Human Rights for gay people, they most certainly are not France and I find that plays on my feelings in regard to what level of sympathy I might be able to offer.

    I feel bad that anyone would be suicide-bombed. If you want to kill yourself, you do that in private so that you don't harm others. I do not judge that. But I think I'm in my rights to judge if you purposely take others with you. And I don't look at it in terms of Karma. I would never think one deserved more pain than the other regardless of their past doings. I might take from that a sense of poetic justice but not of Karma, not of any debt or due.

    So while I might feel as badly for the harm done in either location, I might not feel as obligated to express it.

    Reality's a funny thing. So how do I show solidarity, given who I am and who they are and what happened? Oh I don't know. Would it be okay if I offer condolence to the families while I hope that only homophobes were harmed in the making of this film?
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Nov 16, 2015 5:08 PM GMT
    Beirut used to be called the Paris of the middle east. It was (relatively) liberal and the various ethnicities were peaceful, even intermarried much like various Christian sects here. And then the troubles started. The comment about Syria^^^ is a bit wrong-- Syria started out as a peacekeeper but then, as usual, they used their presence to make mischief, just like we do during Republican administrations.

    The citizens of Beirut do deserve our sympathy. They are trying to overcome the crazies in their own midst and rejoin the civilized world. I personally think all the syrupy We are Charlie and its various iterations serve zero purpose and less and less as these barbaric atrocities multiply. The fact that this Lebanon doesn't register much on our radar is understandable and I trust our government said the appropriate things and offered help. The rest is just media.
  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1051

    Nov 16, 2015 5:23 PM GMT
    Destinharbor saidBeirut used to be called the Paris of the middle east. It was (relatively) liberal and the various ethnicities were peaceful, even intermarried much like various Christian sects here. And then the troubles started. The comment about Syria^^^ is a bit wrong-- Syria started out as a peacekeeper but then, as usual, they used their presence to make mischief, just like we do during Republican administrations.

    The citizens of Beirut do deserve our sympathy. They are trying to overcome the crazies in their own midst and rejoin the civilized world. I personally think all the syrupy We are Charlie and its various iterations serve zero purpose and less and less as these barbaric atrocities multiply. The fact that this Lebanon doesn't register much on our radar is understandable and I trust our government said the appropriate things and offered help. The rest is just media.


    Howler of the year: "Syria started out as a peacekeeper..."
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    Nov 16, 2015 5:46 PM GMT
    Always wondered why Africa is not the heart of terrorism?

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    Nov 16, 2015 6:10 PM GMT
    Destinharbor saidBeirut used to be called the Paris of the middle east. It was (relatively) liberal and the various ethnicities were peaceful, even intermarried much like various Christian sects here. And then the troubles started. The comment about Syria^^^ is a bit wrong-- Syria started out as a peacekeeper but then, as usual, they used their presence to make mischief, just like we do during Republican administrations.

    The citizens of Beirut do deserve our sympathy. They are trying to overcome the crazies in their own midst and rejoin the civilized world. I personally think all the syrupy We are Charlie and its various iterations serve zero purpose and less and less as these barbaric atrocities multiply. The fact that this Lebanon doesn't register much on our radar is understandable and I trust our government said the appropriate things and offered help. The rest is just media.


    Well said. I've gotten to know only one Lebanese guy that I'm aware of, a colleague who I partied with for about 2 years back in the 80s. Real nice guy. So my personal experience has been only positive. The only distinction I'd make is not that I should sympathize but in understanding my own internal conflicts, how might I sympathize for a country though leaning in my direction, might now and certainly has immediate & long history of treating me as less than human.

    And I don't reserve that dilemma but apply it relative to past injustice and current progress also in my own country, hell, even to heterosexuals in general. Truth is that we live in a world that's fucked us. I can find a place of less importance for that; I don't have to carry it as a grudge; but also I can't put it aside in some frozen state of denial: eternal vigilance has demands too.

    So while I might sympathize, I might not attend the funeral; while my attendance would be unquestioned were my own human rights not violated.

    Just googled this to see what else you were talking about:

    http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/lebanon-syria-timeline-1976-2014-282583182
    Timeline of relations since 1976 between Damascus and Lebanon, which, overwhelmed by a massive influx of refugees from Syria's civil war, began imposing Monday unprecedented visa restrictions on Syrians.

    - June 6, 1976: A year after the start of the Lebanese civil war, Syrian troops enter the country at the request of Christian groups.

    - March 16, 1977: Druze leader Kamal Jumblatt is assassinated.

    - July, 1978: Shelling of Beirut's Christian neighbourhoods by the Syrian army after a change of alliance, having sided with mostly Muslim and Palestinian leftist forces.

    - June, 1982: Israeli forces invade Lebanon, sweeping into Beirut. In September, Syrian troops pull back to the east of the country while Palestinian fighters move east and north.

    - February, 1987: With the civil war still raging, some 8,000 Syrian soldiers are deployed in west Beirut.

    - October 22, 1989: Lebanese inter-party talks in Taif, Saudi Arabia, produce an agreement that will in 1990 end the civil war. The deal calls for a Syrian pullback to the east of the country, but does not set a date for a full withdrawal.

    - May 22, 1991: Lebanon and Syria sign a friendship treaty, which sets Syria's dominating role in stone.

    - October 15, 1998: Emile Lahoud, a pro-Syrian general, is elected president of Lebanon.

    - April 16, 2001: An Israeli raid against a Syrian position after an attack by Lebanese Shiite movement Hezbollah. The bulk of the Syrian army deploys to the Bekaa Valley, in the east.

    - September 2, 2004: The UN Security Council adopts Resolution 1559 calling for the withdrawal of foreign forces from Lebanon and respect for its sovereignty.

    - February 14, 2005: Anti-Syrian Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri is assassinated. His supporters accuse Syria of ordering the killing but Damascus denies any involvement.

    - April 26: The last Syrian troops leave Lebanon after 29 years of presence, under pressure from the street, the opposition and the international community.

    - May 7, 2008: The start of clashes between Hezbollah, backed by Syria and Iran, and government supporters, backed by Saudi Arabia and the US. Nearly 100 die in one week.

    - May 25: Army chief Michel Sleiman is elected Lebanon's 12th president after a deal between the government and opposition in Doha.

    - October 15: Lebanon and Syria formally establish diplomatic relations for the first time since they emerged as independent states after World War II.

    - March 15, 2011: Start of the conflict in Syria, which will develop into a devastating and complex civil war.

    Lebanon's government, where more than 1.1 million Syrians have found refuge, is split between supporters of the Syrian government, including Hezbollah, and backers of the uprising, making any decision on the refugees difficult.


    Oh so funny, just rereading for errors I noticed a name the same as a very dear friend of mine who I've known since we were probably 3 years old. He still complains that I once bit him. haha. I completely forgot--he's so American--but they also were from Lebanon.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 16, 2015 8:25 PM GMT
    metta saidNow How Do We Show Solidarity With Beirut?


    http://reverbpress.com/news/international/beirut-lebanon-terrorist-attack/


    Thank, I feel sorry for innocent victims. I see no reason not to feel disgust when innocents are killed, them being French, Americans, Lebanese, Israeli or Palestinian.

    It's morally corrupt to pretend any of those innocents deserve what they got.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14372

    Nov 18, 2015 2:01 AM GMT
    The thing that worries me is who is next to be bombed by these blood thirsty, sick minded radicalsicon_question.gif this ISIS is like a deadly cancer. They are creeping quietly all over the damn place plotting their next major target. My thoughts and prayers go out to both Paris and Beirut.
  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1051

    Nov 18, 2015 1:44 PM GMT
    Destinharbor saidBeirut used to be called the Paris of the middle east. It was (relatively) liberal and the various ethnicities were peaceful, even intermarried much like various Christian sects here. And then the troubles started. The comment about Syria^^^ is a bit wrong-- Syria started out as a peacekeeper but then, as usual, they used their presence to make mischief, just like we do during Republican administrations.

    The citizens of Beirut do deserve our sympathy. They are trying to overcome the crazies in their own midst and rejoin the civilized world. I personally think all the syrupy We are Charlie and its various iterations serve zero purpose and less and less as these barbaric atrocities multiply. The fact that this Lebanon doesn't register much on our radar is understandable and I trust our government said the appropriate things and offered help. The rest is just media.


    Detroit used to be called the Paris of the Midwest.