Do you sound gay? What our voices tell us and what they do not?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 27, 2015 11:19 PM GMT
    I came across this topic and maybe it has been discussed before in RJ or not.

    Nonetheless, I thought it was a very interesting topic about our speech, speech pathology and where does our "gay" voice come from in a sense what shaped it at an early age and what influenced later.

    Have you ever wonder how others perceived in your speech to others, do you come across with a high pitch, or normal pitch, also geographical locations and the South versus the North, and West coasts.

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jul/17/camp-the-voice-gay-rights

    David Thorpe also has made a film about this and thought it interesting-

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Nov 27, 2015 11:47 PM GMT
    Apparently, I come of as monotone to a lot of people lol. I had to take acting class to break out of that.
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    Nov 28, 2015 2:24 PM GMT
    I am pretty masculine but I when I hear my voice in voicemail or phone messages, I think I sound Gay. I suspect the electronics filter out the low end frequencies in my voice.

    I think that men interpret characteristically adolescent sounding voices (slightly higher pitch with nasal overtones,) in older looking men as Gay sounding. Having worked with young people for a number of years now, I’ve noted that many adolescent males sound Gay, even if they are not. Could it be that trying to sound young results in the “vocal fry” people are talking about?

    My two cents,
    FloridRugbyBear
  • JackNNJ

    Posts: 1051

    Nov 28, 2015 2:32 PM GMT
    White Liberal men often sound gay.
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    Nov 28, 2015 4:59 PM GMT
    There is definitely a gay voice and it used to be a pretty good indicator if someone was gay, however, more and more straight men are sounding gay in their speech patterns.

    The theory that gay men spend more time with their mothers and other females and thereby mimic their speech doesn't hold water in the case of a good friend of mine. He always sounded gay from the time he was a kid, but his mother had a deeper, more masculine voice than he did.
  • FitBlackCuddl...

    Posts: 803

    Nov 28, 2015 8:15 PM GMT
    "Do you sound gay? What our voices tell us and what they do not?"

    When I hear a Brit speaking, even a child, there is a precision, a kind of elegance of word and tone that I admire.

    When I hear a "stereotyped gay" voice, the effect is the opposite. Nasal, snooty and overstated.
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    Nov 28, 2015 9:24 PM GMT
    Lmao, "my straight friend sounds gay" you don't sound gay, you sound fucking feminine, there's a difference. you can't sound like a sexual orientation, you sound like a gender role that is associated with orientation; that is why straight guys can sound feminine and still be straight. "you sound gay" is slang to save time. Also the guy saying he hates himself when he feels good when people tell him they didn't know he was gay, is also stupid, obviously you feel good, they're implying they looked at you like everybody else which is a normalcy we all desire, you're not abandoning the gay community.

    Guys who sound feminine/gay IMO, are guys that identify with femininity more than masculinity. I don't think your voice is completely natural. Based on experience, I have family members whose voice changes based on the environment and social setting, and almost everyone changes their voice based on some environmental factors. We tend to want to be like the people who accept us the most, and for gays, it has always been women. You can be a man who is macho and like men, you can be a feminine guy who likes women. It just so happens that a lot gay men like acting like women.
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    Nov 28, 2015 11:42 PM GMT
    I agree with the same comments of overhearing the nasal and over stressing the words/vowels in several gatherings or social setting I have been with other gay friends that I witnessed. I also agree that I think there is another issue here of self-esteem more so of sounding gay..being proud of who you are and having respect for yourself which I think that David T is trying to reconcile.

    For me, everyone always tells me they still hear an ascent from my Spanish background which is definitely true, more like a Chilean ascent and that is true since that was the last country I lived...but I also remember in High School and Middle School being picked up by bullies - hence I learned to down low my voice to be more masculine as David Savages stated it was a protection mechanism that we also learned how to change our voices and I could relate to this action.
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Nov 29, 2015 9:40 AM GMT
    I agree there are many straight men with "gay" voices. I never really gave mine much thought and don't really care.