oatmeal pumpkin fruitcake

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    Dec 07, 2015 3:40 AM GMT
    Here's the basic recipe. Notes and comments follow it.

    Use 1 large can of libby's pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling) and follow the recipe on the can.

    That uses 2 cans of evaporated milk; take out 110 grams from one of the cans and freeze that; that is, use the remaining 230 grams of evap milk and freeze 110 grams of evap milk. Then use 2 additional eggs for the pumpkin pie filling (a large egg is 50 grams).

    Total weight of pie filling is about 1,980 grams; divide in half e.g., 1,980 / 2 = 990.
    In one half put one fourth as much quick oats, e.g., 990 / 4 = 245; 245 grams of oats.

    Let rest overnight covered in the fridge, stirring every so often if you remember.

    Add and mix well the drained dried fruit and nuts that were soaking in liqueur. Drain them for at least 15 minutes.

    Bake for about 1 hour and 30 minutes (at least) until the internal temperature is 190° or more, in a greased and papered loaf pan, 325° oven. You can raise the oven temperature to 350° for the last 15 minutes or so if you want the crust brown. When the internal temperature isn't isn't up to 190° just return it to the oven for another 10 or 15 minutes. Repeat until it's the correct temperature.

    Cool for 10 minutes in the pan then turn out onto a wire cooling rack and let cool completely. Wrap and refrigerate.

    -------------------------

    Special equipment: a scale and a digital cooking thermometer.

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    If you use the 2 pie can of plain pumpkin (not the pumpkin pie mix can) you'll have enough batter to make several fruitcakes, depending on the size of the pan you bake it in. Using the digital thermometer lets you bake it to the correct doneness without having to adjust for the size of the pan. So far I've only baked it in loaf pans.

    To figure out how much batter you'll need use a measuring cup and count how many cups of water fill your pan. Use about 1 or so cup less so that you have space for the dried fruits and nuts. I prefer to err on the side of too much batter and bake some muffins with the excess.

    There is no baking powder in the recipe so the cake doesn't puff up like a normal cake therefore you can fill the pan up to the rim.

    The end result is very dense and heavy, not like your usual fruitcake. But in my opinion it's much better than the usual fruitcake.

    You can cheat and use that candied citron and cherries stuff they're selling in the grocery store but it's much better when you use dried fruit that's been soaked in liqueur. That stuff in the grocery store is loaded with sugar. My local health food store has an interesting variety of dried fruits. For liqueur choices the sky's the limit. I've been soaking each fruit in a different liqueur. Cassis is one of my favorites; it's made from currants. My next batch will use walnuts that have been soaking in Frangelico, which is made with hazelnuts. Previously the walnuts weren't soaked.

    If you chop the dried fruit to be at most pea sized it takes about 3 days to plump up. But longer is better.

    Letting the batter rest overnight is important so that the oats fully soak up as much as they can. You may be able to use regular oats instead of quick oats, I've only been using quick oats. (Quick oats aren't precooked or anything, just smashed and rolled into smaller pieces.)
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    Dec 07, 2015 3:48 AM GMT
    I've also made this fruitcake with a 50/50 combination of teff and buckwheat flour instead of the oats and that came out well. It was quite dark since both of those grains are dark. Makes it look more like a traditional fruitcake.

    Still tastes great even though I've never liked buckwheat pancakes.
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    Dec 07, 2015 3:58 AM GMT
    You can likely use other pumpkin pie recipes. I increased the spices by adding 1/2 teaspoon more of cinnamon and 1/4 teaspoon more of cloves, 1/4 or 1/2 teaspoon of cardamom, and 1/2 or 1 teaspoon of vanilla. Unfortunately I didn't write down how much so that's from memory. The oats mute and dull the spices.
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    Dec 07, 2015 4:13 AM GMT
    Do you ship?
    lol sounds good...
  • badbug

    Posts: 800

    Dec 07, 2015 6:47 AM GMT

    "oatmeal pumpkin fruitcake"


    ......sounds gay. icon_cool.gif
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Dec 08, 2015 6:46 PM GMT
    Sounds like it'd keep you regular, too.

    Lumpy, are you saying that there is a fruitcake recipe on the pumpkin can?
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    Dec 08, 2015 7:45 PM GMT
    LJay saidLumpy, are you saying that there is a fruitcake recipe on the pumpkin can?

    No, you make the pumpkin pie recipe that's on the can, but don't put it in a pie shell. You mix the oats with the pie filling (and later the fruits and nuts) and then bake it in a loaf pan, bundt pan, or whatever.
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    Dec 08, 2015 10:44 PM GMT
    The idea for this came from a recipe for pumpkin bread pudding which I had made several years ago and which was outstanding, no doubt largely due to my using a brioche bread that I had made which is made with a lot of eggs.

    http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/pumpkin-bread-pudding-recipe

    I think that the next one I make I'm going to use their amounts for the spices and vanilla. Compare it to Libby's.

    http://www.verybestbaking.com/recipes/18470/libbys-famous-pumpkin-pie/

    The first of these I'd made only had nuts in it. After that one I added the soaked dried fruits. Adding fresh cranberries (unsoaked) along with the fruits and nuts also works. I cut each one in half (individually; yes, rather tedious).
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    Dec 08, 2015 10:50 PM GMT
    If you use the above single pie can of plain pumpkin you take out 50 grams from the evaporated milk and replace it with an additional egg, for a total of 3 eggs.
  • LJay

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    Dec 08, 2015 11:48 PM GMT
    So what quantity of fruits and nuts total?

    As for cutting cranberries in half, try to find two jar lids Between which you can trap the cranberries and then run a long knife between the lids to cut a handful of berries at once. Works for cherry tomatoes, too.
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    Dec 09, 2015 1:28 AM GMT
    LJay saidSo what quantity of fruits and nuts total?

    It's a matter of choice. As long as there's enough batter to glue them together you'll be fine.
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    Dec 09, 2015 2:01 AM GMT
    LJay saidSo what quantity of fruits and nuts total?

    It's also better to think about it in terms of a ratio of fruits and nuts to the batter since I measure the capacity of the loaf pan and then scoop out an appropriate quantity of batter from the bowl into another bowl where I mix in the fruits and nuts. Where "appropriate quantity" is a guestimate. But I've never measured how much fruits and nuts I've added. I'm thinking that it would be safe to use 1 cup of fruits and nuts per 1 cup of batter, and you wouldn't pack the fruits and nuts into the measuring cup so the space between them gives you some leeway.
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    Dec 09, 2015 3:19 AM GMT
    When it's done don't treat it like a traditional fruitcake where you regularly brush it with rum, brandy, or whatever. It's too dense for that. That would probably turn it into a gooey mess.
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    Dec 16, 2015 8:13 AM GMT
    I'm going to be huge by the time this winter is over.

    I made another one this time with just dried bananas that had been soaked in liqueur (Drambuie I think it was called; I didn't care for it, too much alcohol) and walnuts that had been soaked in hazelnut liqueur. No other fruit.

    I also played around with the flour and used a combination of oat flour, rice flour, and corn tortilla flour. Cranking up the spices to match the King Arthur Flour recipe amounts definitely makes it a winner.

    Anyhow, it is great. The corn tortilla flour makes it interesting and its corn tortilla flavor goes away when it's in a sweet bread. I made one with all corn tortilla flour and it was very good; it had an intriguing flavor, in a good way.