Has anyone lost weight successfully and how?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 10, 2015 5:29 AM GMT
    I'm sure there's a few threads on this topic. Yet to search more but I am curious to know if anyone out there can testify to losing weight successfully with any particular method. I am pretty new to exercising in the gym and cardio in general. I used to run and cycle a lot and never had to worry about gaining fat until the last year or two. So any tips would be useful.

    Thanks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 10, 2015 5:46 AM GMT
    lots of cardio and lots of green foods.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 10, 2015 7:57 AM GMT
    Go on a trip that you have to walk a lot. I lost weight while enjoying sightseeing.
  • badbug

    Posts: 800

    Dec 10, 2015 8:17 AM GMT
    rock cocaine.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 10, 2015 1:45 PM GMT
    In 2007 I weighed 238, much of which was fat. I wore a size 38 waist and was prediabetic and on cholesterol and blood pressure meds. I was able to get down to 200 lbs in 18 mos, and by 2009 I was down to 185. Today I weigh 170-175 year of over year and have found it to be a healthy weight for me. No meds.

    What helped me.

    1. Keeping a food journal. I use an excel spreadsheet as it makes it easy to plan out my food and auto-tabulates my entries.

    Why this works:
    Its like a calorie budget. It's less about counting calories and more about calorie awareness... which is where the battle is fought. I started thinking about what foods I can eat that will actually fill me up for longer so that I don't exceed my ideal calories. This has worked for me, my family members and is the premise for many of the nutrisystem and weight watchers programs.

    2. Get a handle on your sugar and starches intake immediately...
    And I am telling you that the weight will start to really fall off and your hunger cravings will change when you get your sugar and starch intake in check. Even sweet fruits, juices and oatmeal can wreck your weight loss. Again, I'm talking about weight loss not maintaining a healthy weight.


    3. Take 1-2 walks per day in addition to your usual work outs. I found taking a walk after lunch/dinner to be pretty effective both with not having that food coma feeling but also with digesting heavy meals and holding off cravings.

    4. Cooked Veggies go A LONG, LONG way.
    Broccoli, spinach, squash, asparagus, brussel sprouts, string beans, cauliflower hold water and keep you full and regular. Season them the right way (lemon & pepper, italian seasoning, garlic seasoning) and you'll have something delicious and nutritious.

    5. Find dessert substitutions:
    - Instead of ice cream, make a banana/unsweetened almond milk/vanilla seasoning/sea salt smoothie.

    -Instead of cake or pie or cookies, eat roasted sweet potatoes or butternut squash or a banana.

    There are other substitutions you can make or find online.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 10, 2015 5:00 PM GMT
    Don't get ahead of yourself, & don't start off thinking about the large amount. Start with smaller goals, 10lbs, 20lbs. It took time to put it on, & will take time to come off. Don't give up if you mess up, eating too much, or missing exercise. Just keep going. If you are very overweight, & have not worked out before, & are also changing your eating habits then don't think you need to start with both right away. Either start with a new eating regimen, & as you start to lose you can eventually start the exercise, or start off by going on walks, or just doing atleast 15-20 minutes a day on a stationary, or real bike. Don't go into it thinking of your eating as a diet! You will only fail as your mind will think it's temporary. You need to learn to per antsy change eating habits, however choosing an Italian program like weight watchers you will see there are no foods that you can't have. It's just about balance. I'd say the biggest mind set " aha moment " that changed things for me was when I came across a food I loved, & wanted that everyone else is eating I realized that I don't NEED to eat this right now. This is not the last chance I'll ever get to eat this food. I can eat it another time, but I don't have to right now.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 10, 2015 7:36 PM GMT
    I went from 240 to 175. I ate vegan; no meat, no fish, no chicken, no eggs, no milk, no cheese, etc. I also didn't eat any sweets; cookies, cakes, candies, etc. And i checked the label of anything canned or in a jar for added sugar and chose the one with the least sugar (e.g., spaghetti sauce). I also cut back as much as possible on fats. Anything from grains was whole grains.

    The weight loss wasn't fast but it was steady and consistent, I think maybe a pound every other week.

    It may have been due to the diet or due to the food being so bland and insipid that I didn't eat as much.

    Rather than think of substituting fruits for sweets, train yourself to think of eating as simply a way to fuel your body, not something you do for pleasure and enjoyment. In other words, train yourself to not need sweet things. After you lose the weight you can return to enjoying sweets, in moderation.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 10, 2015 9:03 PM GMT
    woodfordr saidIn 2007 I weighed 238, much of which was fat. I wore a size 38 waist and was prediabetic and on cholesterol and blood pressure meds. I was able to get down to 200 lbs in 18 mos, and by 2009 I was down to 185. Today I weigh 170-175 year of over year and have found it to be a healthy weight for me. No meds.

    What helped me.

    1. Keeping a food journal. I use an excel spreadsheet as it makes it easy to plan out my food and auto-tabulates my entries.

    Why this works:
    Its like a calorie budget. It's less about counting calories and more about calorie awareness... which is where the battle is fought. I started thinking about what foods I can eat that will actually fill me up for longer so that I don't exceed my ideal calories. This has worked for me, my family members and is the premise for many of the nutrisystem and weight watchers programs.

    2. Get a handle on your sugar and starches intake immediately...
    And I am telling you that the weight will start to really fall off and your hunger cravings will change when you get your sugar and starch intake in check. Even sweet fruits, juices and oatmeal can wreck your weight loss. Again, I'm talking about weight loss not maintaining a healthy weight.


    3. Take 1-2 walks per day in addition to your usual work outs. I found taking a walk after lunch/dinner to be pretty effective both with not having that food coma feeling but also with digesting heavy meals and holding off cravings.

    4. Cooked Veggies go A LONG, LONG way.
    Broccoli, spinach, squash, asparagus, brussel sprouts, string beans, cauliflower hold water and keep you full and regular. Season them the right way (lemon & pepper, italian seasoning, garlic seasoning) and you'll have something delicious and nutritious.

    5. Find dessert substitutions:
    - Instead of ice cream, make a banana/unsweetened almond milk/vanilla seasoning/sea salt smoothie.

    -Instead of cake or pie or cookies, eat roasted sweet potatoes or butternut squash or a banana.

    There are other substitutions you can make or find online.



    Listen to this man! Losing weight is just a nutritional numbers game. If you eat more than you burn, you will gain weight. If you burn more than you eat, you lose weight. Your body abides by the laws of thermodynamics. I recommend downloading myFitnessPal so you can record your calories and macros as well as purchasing a digital kitchen scale so you know that you are getting the correct serving size. I wish you the best on your fitness journey!
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Dec 10, 2015 9:23 PM GMT
    This^^^^ is all good stuff and basic to losing weight. Couple of things I'd add-- NO sweets. Just get them out of your diet and out of your head and certainly out of your house. No sodas. Drink unsweet tea for flavor or water with lemon. PORTION CONTROL. If you want a smaller stomach, you can't constantly stretch it out. The main thing is to establish a habit of eating that you can live with for the rest of your life. And that you enjoy. Taste is what matters, not quantity. Reset your thinking.
  • Whipmagic

    Posts: 1481

    Dec 11, 2015 4:29 AM GMT
    Here is something that worked for me for quickly dropping 15 pounds for a particular occasion: go on a serious ketogenic diet. I was already working out seriously six times a week, and wanted to go in a quick, four week cut. I reduced my carbs to next to nothing (around 30 grams a day) and also cut out all alcohol while keeping up my exercise regime. Lots of protein shakes to get the calories in in order to be able to function normally. The first week felt like hell, but then it was actually quite pleasant and the pounds came off from where I wanted to lose them. But it was not sustainable in the long run.
  • jock_n_ca

    Posts: 148

    Dec 11, 2015 5:04 AM GMT
    Eat less. Exercise more.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 11, 2015 8:05 AM GMT
    actually exercise has little to go with weight loss.
    take a few days and write down exactly what you eat
    google the calories for each day
    if you eat less than 1800 calories you loose weight

    after a few days couple of weeks you metabolism might slow down, now time for lite exercise, cardio and junk. Maybe go out for a run, bike ride. skip the above and drink more coffee.

    long term; setup to control what you put in your face.
  • Oceans_of_Flo...

    Posts: 393

    Dec 12, 2015 4:59 AM GMT
    Walk, A LOT.

    .............................
  • buddycat

    Posts: 1874

    Dec 12, 2015 11:55 AM GMT
    Diet mostly, plus cardio. Just identifying problems within my diet.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 12, 2015 1:08 PM GMT
    I am not a health care or fitness professional so this advice is given "as is". If this seems dangerous to anyone who is an expert, then please correct me.

    I had a very successful diet back in grad school, and lost so much weight that people thought I was ill. Sadly, I have not been able to re-produce the results under my current work schedule.

    (1) Eliminate all sugars and alcohol. (2) Drink 1 ounce of ice-water per day for every 2 pounds you weight. Using a plastic 32 ounce cup makes this easy: just fill it and drink it while you are reading or studying. (3) Do cardio the standard 3 or more times a week for at least half an hour, gradually increasing the during as time progresses.

    After about month to burn/flush all the sugar out of your system, you will start to consistently lose a pound or two a week. However any sweets or alcohol at all will reset this and you have to start again.

    Just my two cent,
    FloridaRugbyBear
  • Hypertrophile

    Posts: 1021

    Dec 13, 2015 10:14 PM GMT
    I cut out starchy carbs. No bread, pasta, or rice, unless whole grain, and then sparingly, and only sweet potatoes or yams, no Russets. Also, I used more low-intensity cardio (HR<70%max), 2-3 times per week.

    I think a good exercise program for weight loss should start with resistance work followed by cardio. You will burn more fat during cardio training if it immediately follows your weight workout.

    If you are new to weight-training, don't worry about your body weight as much as composition. It's likely in the early stages that you'll gain weight by having added muscle. This is a good thing, a very good thing IMO. As long as your ratio of muscle to fat is improving, that's the name of the game.
  • Noeton

    Posts: 208

    Dec 29, 2015 11:03 PM GMT
    When you think food think protein and some fat. When you are at a normal body fat percentage, i.e. 10% or below, which is to say your six pack is showing, then consume carbs for energy for your workouts and active lifestyle. Do a lot of cardio to cut fat. That body fat is stored energy -- use it all up. To lose one pound of fat, you have to burn 3500 calories -- that's like about 3.5 hours of running constantly or 12 hours walking per pound -- it varies by individual, look for a calorie burn counter online. Simply put, you will have to do a lot of cardio -- with your diet in check. Continue to do cardio as part of an active lifestyle after leaning out to keep your endurance and cardiovascular health up. You may be addicted to carbs and suffer withdrawal symptoms. That is temporary. If you love vegetables, eat them. But if you don't want to (like probably most people), take adequate vitamin and mineral supplements. Vegetables are good for providing the essential vitamins and minerals, but that's it. Protein is essential, fats are essential, but carbs are not nutritionally essential to human life. They are good for energy, but only once you are already lean. Milk has tons of carbs. As do beer and wine. Don't worry about artificial sweetener or non-organic foods, just consume them when you want and exercise and keep an active lifestyle -- you'll feel great and look great. Splenda, low carb protein bars, low carb protein powder are allies. Those low carb protein bars have a lot of fiber, too, e.g. Quest and Oh Yeah One bars. Cream is an ally -- no carbs. Meat, eggs, cheese, butter and cream are satiating, they fill you up -- veggies and carbs don't fill you up as well. Eat for satiety and never torture yourself with fasting or "portion control". Don't make the mistake of eating a salad as your main dish to "be healthy and lose weight" -- you'll only end up "rewarding" yourself with a cupcake. Still, have a cupcake on special occasions. I frequently walk by a restaurant called "Just Salad" and look through the window -- everyone behind the counter is "just obese" and everyone in front of the counter is "just emaciated". If you are overweight and eating a box of Oreos because you're sad or distressed, patiently find a permanent and constructive solution to the problems you face. If you want to eat out, you're probably going to have to consume some carbs. Carbs cost restaurants practically nothing, and they love nothing better than to sell them to you at a high rate of profit -- that's why they're everywhere. Don't go for the "hummus and pita" or quinoa -- those are fads for the mentally challenged. Steak and eggs at a diner. In sum: do cardio to create a calorie deficit until you are lean. Eat for satiety. Consume carbs for energy after you are lean, while maintaining an active lifestyle. And if you fall off the wagon, don't beat yourself up, just get back on. Overall, don't be evil, don't follow fads and think for yourself!

    I don't think calorie counting is necessary, but if it helps you reach your goal of getting lean and active, by all means do it. You probably won't need to once you get into habit of a healthy lifestyle. Here are some links I find useful, despite some minor quibbles I have with some of the information. Good luck! The results are worth it and they start right away.

    http://www.amazon.com/How-Live-Longer-Feel-Better/dp/0870710966
    http://www.amazon.com/Putting-All-Together-Orthomolecular-Nutrition/dp/0879836334/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1451452566&sr=1-4&keywords=abram+hoffer
    http://www.anabolicmen.com/vince-girondas-old-school-steak-and-eggs-diet-for-ultimate-weight-loss/
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSeSTq-N4U4
    http://www.dietdoctor.com/lchf
    http://www.westonaprice.org/abcs-of-nutrition/
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJ0WJOQzrgg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 30, 2015 12:59 AM GMT
    Everyone will bark at me, but calorie counting worked for me. I lost like 100 lbs that way and kept it off. You don't NEED to calorie count, I guess, as long as you're mindful of what you eat and keep a food journal. Ultimately you are only accountable to yourself on this, so a food journal is a powerful ally, as others have already said in this thread.
  • interestingch...

    Posts: 694

    Jan 16, 2016 7:37 PM GMT
    Obviously with the right diet, and that doesn't mean starving yourself, salads, fruit and vegetables, fish, foul and lamb rather than beef and used as a side dish, also nuts are pretty good, eating organic and GM free food helps but with this type of food if you mix 1/4 glass of organic grape juice with water 1 and 1/2 hours before each meal apparently does something to your metabolism and burns off the fat, if anyone tries this then please let me know, I would be interested if this works.
    Having a sedentary lifestyle won't help but some exercise will have an affect alongside all this.
    As with anything it takes time for results to happen, try it for a few months and see if it works
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 17, 2016 11:31 AM GMT
    Back into vigorous training for my second climb of Mount Rainier coming up in July and got the scale heading back in the right direction.

    Was down into the low 180s after my Denali climb last June but didn't skip many meals after my return and inched back above 200. Now that I'm swimming again, the extra pounds are starting to melt off. For whatever reason, I find that running is great for training purposes but has zero effect on my weight.

    I also swear by raspberry ketones. I use Raspberry Slim, which is pretty inexpensive and find that it boosts my metabolism big time. Once in the morning and once at dinner.

    YMMV.
  • Hans21773

    Posts: 1

    Feb 12, 2016 5:59 AM GMT
    January 2015, I weighted 248. Starting on January 10th, I started to basically watch how much I ate and run. On April 26th, I ran in a 1/2 marathon in Austin, TX.

    I was at a comfortable but not goal weight of 205 by mid August.

    Unfortunately, northwest gray winters and the holidays got me back up to 217. I am still running between 18 to 35 miles a week, but have platued at 210-212. But I am working on that.
  • ChicagoSteve

    Posts: 1277

    Feb 15, 2016 12:54 AM GMT
    woodfordr saidIn 2007 I weighed 238, much of which was fat. I wore a size 38 waist and was prediabetic and on cholesterol and blood pressure meds. I was able to get down to 200 lbs in 18 mos, and by 2009 I was down to 185. Today I weigh 170-175 year of over year and have found it to be a healthy weight for me. No meds.

    What helped me.

    1. Keeping a food journal. I use an excel spreadsheet as it makes it easy to plan out my food and auto-tabulates my entries.

    Why this works:
    Its like a calorie budget. It's less about counting calories and more about calorie awareness... which is where the battle is fought. I started thinking about what foods I can eat that will actually fill me up for longer so that I don't exceed my ideal calories. This has worked for me, my family members and is the premise for many of the nutrisystem and weight watchers programs.

    2. Get a handle on your sugar and starches intake immediately...
    And I am telling you that the weight will start to really fall off and your hunger cravings will change when you get your sugar and starch intake in check. Even sweet fruits, juices and oatmeal can wreck your weight loss. Again, I'm talking about weight loss not maintaining a healthy weight.


    3. Take 1-2 walks per day in addition to your usual work outs. I found taking a walk after lunch/dinner to be pretty effective both with not having that food coma feeling but also with digesting heavy meals and holding off cravings.

    4. Cooked Veggies go A LONG, LONG way.
    Broccoli, spinach, squash, asparagus, brussel sprouts, string beans, cauliflower hold water and keep you full and regular. Season them the right way (lemon & pepper, italian seasoning, garlic seasoning) and you'll have something delicious and nutritious.

    5. Find dessert substitutions:
    - Instead of ice cream, make a banana/unsweetened almond milk/vanilla seasoning/sea salt smoothie.

    -Instead of cake or pie or cookies, eat roasted sweet potatoes or butternut squash or a banana.

    There are other substitutions you can make or find online.



    Congrats, that's great progress! I agree with you as far as sugar. I consume very little sugar, I was never a sweets eater. Some foods you don't even think of as having lots of sugar, really do. For example today on my way home after working out, I stopped at Trader Joe's and bought a beef & broccoli stir fry. This was the first time purchasing this, and they include a sauce that you add to the pan when you stir fry it. I took one bite, and it tasted sugary sweet, really ruining the whole dish for me. If I make it again, I won't use their sauce, maybe just some sesame oil.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 22, 2016 12:47 AM GMT
    I simply eat less. Avoid breads and most carbs. Also dropped dairy products. Easy since I became lactose intolerant to milk, anyway. Drink lots of plain water. I never ordered water at restaurants before (years ago they brought it routinely), but now I do and drink the whole glass.

    I keep a glass of water right here at the computer keyboard, that I drink & refill all day long. No sodas/pops of any kind. In the morning maybe some tea, no sugar.

    I try to walk & bicycle more, but not easy being disabled. Though the more weight I lose (40 pounds so far) the more spry I feel. Easier to be active when you're not dragging around an anchor with you. It's all tied together, and kinda ironic - the more overweight you get, the less you want to exercise.

    Well, now I'm within striking distance of the weight I was when I moved to Florida 9 years ago. Lose 20 more pounds and I'll be where I was in 1994 when I retired from the Army. Still trim, meeting official height/weight standards.

    I'm notorious among our friends for how little I eat when we all go out to restaurants. They get the main dish, while I get the appetizer served at the same time as theirs. Or if I do get the main dish, at least half of it will go home boxed. A bit of self-discipline with the menu helps a great deal with weight loss.
  • ANTiSociaLiNJ...

    Posts: 1160

    Mar 26, 2016 10:29 PM GMT
    i have about 20 pounds more to lose.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2016 10:54 PM GMT
    rjb30 saidI'm sure there's a few threads on this topic. Yet to search more but I am curious to know if anyone out there can testify to losing weight successfully with any particular method. I am pretty new to exercising in the gym and cardio in general. I used to run and cycle a lot and never had to worry about gaining fat until the last year or two. So any tips would be useful.

    Thanks.


    Cardio is basically useless for losing fat. Fat loss happens in the kitchen. You simply have to consume fewer calories than you use. If you don't know how many calories you consume, you should track them with a calorie tracking app like MyFitnessPal and if you don't know how many calories you should be aiming for, there are many online tools that can calculate that for you based on your height/weight/age/activity level, etc.